Hyper-Hyphen hypertext dictionary -- based on Webster's Unabridged 1913
via Dailey, via Ralph Sutherland's OPTED, via Gutenberg, via Noah Webster

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A () The first letter of the English and of many other alphabets. The capital A of the alphabets of Middle and Western Europe, as also the small letter (a), besides the forms in Italic, black letter, etc., are all descended from the old Latin A, which was borrowed from the Greek Alpha, of the same form; and this was made from the first letter (/) of the Phoenician alphabet, the equivalent of the Hebrew Aleph, and itself from the Egyptian origin. The Aleph was a consonant letter, with a guttural breath sound that was not an element of Greek articulation; and the Greeks took it to represent their vowel Alpha with the a sound, the Phoenician alphabet having no vowel symbols.

A () The name of the sixth tone in the model major scale (that in C), or the first tone of the minor scale, which is named after it the scale in A minor. The second string of the violin is tuned to the A in the treble staff. -- A sharp (A/) is the name of a musical tone intermediate between A and B. -- A flat (A/) is the name of a tone intermediate between A and G.

A () An adjective, commonly called the indefinite article, and signifying one or any, but less emphatically.

A (prep.) In process of; in the act of; into; to; -- used with verbal substantives in -ing which begin with a consonant. This is a shortened form of the preposition an (which was used before the vowel sound); as in a hunting, a building, a begging.

A () A barbarous corruption of have, of he, and sometimes of it and of they.

A- () A, as a prefix to English words, is derived from various sources. (1) It frequently signifies on or in (from an, a forms of AS. on), denoting a state, as in afoot, on foot, abed, amiss, asleep, aground, aloft, away (AS. onweg), and analogically, ablaze, atremble, etc. (2) AS. of off, from, as in adown (AS. ofd/ne off the dun or hill). (3) AS. a- (Goth. us-, ur-, Ger. er-), usually giving an intensive force, and sometimes the sense of away, on, back, as in arise, abide, ago. (4) Old English y- or i- (corrupted from the AS. inseparable particle ge-, cognate with OHG. ga-, gi-, Goth. ga-), which, as a prefix, made no essential addition to the meaning, as in aware. (5) French a (L. ad to), as in abase, achieve. (6) L. a, ab, abs, from, as in avert. (7) Greek insep. prefix / without, or privative, not, as in abyss, atheist; akin to E. un-.

A 1 () A registry mark given by underwriters (as at Lloyd's) to ships in first-class condition. Inferior grades are indicated by A 2 and A 3.

Aard-vark (n.) An edentate mammal, of the genus Orycteropus, somewhat resembling a pig, common in some parts of Southern Africa. It burrows in the ground, and feeds entirely on ants, which it catches with its long, slimy tongue.

Ab- () A prefix in many words of Latin origin. It signifies from, away , separating, or departure, as in abduct, abstract, abscond. See A-(6).

Ab (n.) The fifth month of the Jewish year according to the ecclesiastical reckoning, the eleventh by the civil computation, coinciding nearly with August.

Abacist (n.) One who uses an abacus in casting accounts; a calculator.

Abaculus (n.) A small tile of glass, marble, or other substance, of various colors, used in making ornamental patterns in mosaic pavements.

Abacus (n.) A calculating table or frame; an instrument for performing arithmetical calculations by balls sliding on wires, or counters in grooves, the lowest line representing units, the second line, tens, etc. It is still employed in China.

Abacus (n.) The uppermost member or division of the capital of a column, immediately under the architrave. See Column.

Abacus (n.) A tablet, panel, or compartment in ornamented or mosaic work.

Abacus (n.) A board, tray, or table, divided into perforated compartments, for holding cups, bottles, or the like; a kind of cupboard, buffet, or sideboard.

Abaiser (n.) Ivory black or animal charcoal.

Abaist (p. p.) Abashed; confounded; discomfited.

Abalone (n.) A univalve mollusk of the genus Haliotis. The shell is lined with mother-of-pearl, and used for ornamental purposes; the sea-ear. Several large species are found on the coast of California, clinging closely to the rocks.

Abandon (v. t.) To give up absolutely; to forsake entirely ; to renounce utterly; to relinquish all connection with or concern on; to desert, as a person to whom one owes allegiance or fidelity; to quit; to surrender.

Abandon (v. t.) Reflexively: To give (one's self) up without attempt at self-control; to yield (one's self) unrestrainedly; -- often in a bad sense.

Abandon (v. t.) To relinquish all claim to; -- used when an insured person gives up to underwriters all claim to the property covered by a policy, which may remain after loss or damage by a peril insured against.

Abandon (n.) A complete giving up to natural impulses; freedom from artificial constraint; careless freedom or ease.

Abandum (n.) Anything forfeited or confiscated.

Abase (a.) To cast down or reduce low or lower, as in rank, office, condition in life, or estimation of worthiness; to depress; to humble; to degrade.

Abash (v. t.) To destroy the self-possession of; to confuse or confound, as by exciting suddenly a consciousness of guilt, mistake, or inferiority; to put to shame; to disconcert; to discomfit.

Abashment (n.) The state of being abashed; confusion from shame.

Abassis (n.) A silver coin of Persia, worth about twenty cents.

Abate (v. t.) To bring down or reduce from a higher to a lower state, number, or degree; to lessen; to diminish; to contract; to moderate; to cut short; as, to abate a demand; to abate pride, zeal, hope.

Abate (v. t.) To decrease, or become less in strength or violence; as, pain abates, a storm abates.

Abate (v. t.) To be defeated, or come to naught; to fall through; to fail; as, a writ abates.

Abatement (n.) The amount abated; that which is taken away by way of reduction; deduction; decrease; a rebate or discount allowed.

Abbe (n.) The French word answering to the English abbot, the head of an abbey; but commonly a title of respect given in France to every one vested with the ecclesiastical habit or dress.

Abbess (n.) A female superior or governess of a nunnery, or convent of nuns, having the same authority over the nuns which the abbots have over the monks. See Abbey.

Abbreviate (v. t.) To make briefer; to shorten; to abridge; to reduce by contraction or omission, especially of words written or spoken.

Abbreviation (n.) The form to which a word or phrase is reduced by contraction and omission; a letter or letters, standing for a word or phrase of which they are a part; as, Gen. for Genesis; U.S.A. for United States of America.

Abbreviator (n.) One of a college of seventy-two officers of the papal court whose duty is to make a short minute of a decision on a petition, or reply of the pope to a letter, and afterwards expand the minute into official form.

Abbreviature (n.) An abridgment; a compendium or abstract.

Abdication (n.) The act of abdicating; the renunciation of a high office, dignity, or trust, by its holder; commonly the voluntary renunciation of sovereign power; as, abdication of the throne, government, power, authority.

Abdomen (n.) The belly, or that part of the body between the thorax and the pelvis. Also, the cavity of the belly, which is lined by the peritoneum, and contains the stomach, bowels, and other viscera. In man, often restricted to the part between the diaphragm and the commencement of the pelvis, the remainder being called the pelvic cavity.

Abdominoscopy (n.) Examination of the abdomen to detect abdominal disease.

Abduce (v. t.) To draw or conduct away; to withdraw; to draw to a different part.

Abelonian (n.) One of a sect in Africa (4th century), mentioned by St. Augustine, who states that they married, but lived in continence, after the manner, as they pretended, of Abel.

Abelmosk (n.) An evergreen shrub (Hibiscus -- formerly Abelmoschus -- moschatus), of the East and West Indies and Northern Africa, whose musky seeds are used in perfumery and to flavor coffee; -- sometimes called musk mallow.

Aberration (n.) A small periodical change of position in the stars and other heavenly bodies, due to the combined effect of the motion of light and the motion of the observer; called annual aberration, when the observer's motion is that of the earth in its orbit, and daily or diurnal aberration, when of the earth on its axis; amounting when greatest, in the former case, to 20.4'', and in the latter, to 0.3''. Planetary aberration is that due to the motion of light and the motion of the planet relative to the earth.

Aberration (n.) The convergence to different foci, by a lens or mirror, of rays of light emanating from one and the same point, or the deviation of such rays from a single focus; called spherical aberration, when due to the spherical form of the lens or mirror, such form giving different foci for central and marginal rays; and chromatic aberration, when due to different refrangibilities of the colored rays of the spectrum, those of each color having a distinct focus.

Abet (v. t.) To instigate or encourage by aid or countenance; -- used in a bad sense of persons and acts; as, to abet an ill-doer; to abet one in his wicked courses; to abet vice; to abet an insurrection.

Abet (v. t.) To contribute, as an assistant or instigator, to the commission of an offense.

Abeyance (n.) Expectancy; condition of being undetermined.

Abhor (v. i.) To shrink back with horror, disgust, or dislike; to be contrary or averse; -- with

Abhorrent (a.) Contrary or repugnant; discordant; inconsistent; -- followed by to.

Abib (n.) The first month of the Jewish ecclesiastical year, corresponding nearly to our April. After the Babylonish captivity this month was called Nisan.

Abidance (n.) The state of abiding; abode; continuance; compliance (with).

Abide (v. i.) To stay; to continue in a place; to have one's abode; to dwell; to sojourn; -- with with before a person, and commonly with at or in before a place.

Abide (v. i.) To remain stable or fixed in some state or condition; to continue; to remain.

Abide (v. t.) To stand the consequences of; to answer for; to suffer for.

Abider (n.) One who abides, or continues.

Abies (n.) A genus of coniferous trees, properly called Fir, as the balsam fir and the silver fir. The spruces are sometimes also referred to this genus.

Abietine (n.) A resinous obtained from Strasburg turpentine or Canada balsam. It is without taste or smell, is insoluble in water, but soluble in alcohol (especially at the boiling point), in strong acetic acid, and in ether.

Abietite (n.) A substance resembling mannite, found in the needles of the common silver fir of Europe (Abies pectinata).

Ability (n.) The quality or state of being able; power to perform, whether physical, moral, intellectual, conventional, or legal; capacity; skill or competence in doing; sufficiency of strength, skill, resources, etc.; -- in the plural, faculty, talent.

Abirritation (n.) A pathological condition opposite to that of irritation; debility; want of strength; asthenia.

Abject (a.) Sunk to a law condition; down in spirit or hope; degraded; servile; groveling; despicable; as, abject posture, fortune, thoughts.

Abject (n.) A person in the lowest and most despicable condition; a castaway.

Abjectedness (n.) A very abject or low condition; abjectness.

Abjuration (n.) The act of abjuring or forswearing; a renunciation upon oath; as, abjuration of the realm, a sworn banishment, an oath taken to leave the country and never to return.

Ablaut (n.) The substitution of one root vowel for another, thus indicating a corresponding modification of use or meaning; vowel permutation; as, get, gat, got; sing, song; hang, hung.

Able (superl.) Having sufficient power, strength, force, skill, means, or resources of any kind to accomplish the object; possessed of qualifications rendering competent for some end; competent; qualified; capable; as, an able workman, soldier, seaman, a man able to work; a mind able to reason; a person able to be generous; able to endure pain; able to play on a piano.

Able (superl.) Legally qualified; possessed of legal competence; as, able to inherit or devise property.

Able-bodied (a.) Having a sound, strong body; physically competent; robust.

Ablegate (n.) A representative of the pope charged with important commissions in foreign countries, one of his duties being to bring to a newly named cardinal his insignia of office.

Abler (a.) comp. of Able.

Ablution (n.) A small quantity of wine and water, which is used to wash the priest's thumb and index finger after the communion, and which then, as perhaps containing portions of the consecrated elements, is drunk by the priest.

-ably () A suffix composed of -able and the adverbial suffix -ly; as, favorably.

Abnormal (a.) Not conformed to rule or system; deviating from the type; anomalous; irregular.

Abode (n.) Stay or continuance in a place; sojourn.

Abode (n.) Place of continuance, or where one dwells; abiding place; residence; a dwelling; a habitation.

Abomination (n.) The feeling of extreme disgust and hatred; abhorrence; detestation; loathing; as, he holds tobacco in abomination.

Abord (n.) Manner of approaching or accosting; address.

Abord (v. t.) To approach; to accost.

Aborigines (n. pl.) The earliest known inhabitants of a country; native races.

Abort (v. i.) To become checked in normal development, so as either to remain rudimentary or shrink away wholly; to become sterile.

Abortion (n.) Any fruit or produce that does not come to maturity, or anything which in its progress, before it is matured or perfect; a complete failure; as, his attempt proved an abortion.

Abound (v. i.) To be copiously supplied; -- followed by in or with.

About (prep.) In the immediate neighborhood of; in contiguity or proximity to; near, as to place; by or on (one's person).

About (prep.) In concern with; engaged in; intent on.

About (prep.) Concerning; with regard to; on account of; touching.

About (adv.) Nearly; approximately; with close correspondence, in quality, manner, degree, etc.; as, about as cold; about as high; -- also of quantity, number, time.

Above (prep.) Figuratively, higher than; superior to in any respect; surpassing; beyond; higher in measure or degree than; as, things above comprehension; above mean actions; conduct above reproach.

Above (adv.) Higher in rank or power; as, he appealed to the court above.

Aboveboard (adv.) Above the board or table. Hence: in open sight; without trick, concealment, or deception.

Abracadabra (n.) A mystical word or collocation of letters written as in the figure. Worn on an amulet it was supposed to ward off fever. At present the word is used chiefly in jest to denote something without meaning; jargon.

Abrahamic (a.) Pertaining to Abraham, the patriarch; as, the Abrachamic covenant.

Abranchiata (n. pl.) A group of annelids, so called because the species composing it have no special organs of respiration.

Abrasion (n.) The act of abrading, wearing, or rubbing off; the wearing away by friction; as, the abrasion of coins.

Abrasion (n.) A superficial excoriation, with loss of substance under the form of small shreds.

Abreast (adv.) Side by side, with breasts in a line; as, "Two men could hardly walk abreast."

Abricock (n.) See Apricot.

Abridge (v. t.) To shorten or contract by using fewer words, yet retaining the sense; to epitomize; to condense; as, to abridge a history or dictionary.

Abridgment (n.) An epitome or compend, as of a book; a shortened or abridged form; an abbreviation.

Abroach (adv.) Broached; in a condition for letting out or yielding liquor, as a cask which is tapped.

Abroad (adv.) Without a certain confine; outside the house; away from one's abode; as, to walk abroad.

Abroad (adv.) Beyond the bounds of a country; in foreign countries; as, we have broils at home and enemies abroad.

Abrupt (a.) Having sudden transitions from one subject to another; unconnected.

Abscess (n.) A collection of pus or purulent matter in any tissue or organ of the body, the result of a morbid process.

Abscissa (n.) One of the elements of reference by which a point, as of a curve, is referred to a system of fixed rectilineal coordinate axes.

Absconded (imp. & p. p.) of Abscond

Absconding (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Abscond

Abscond (v. i.) To hide, withdraw, or be concealed.

Abscond (v. i.) To depart clandestinely; to steal off and secrete one's self; -- used especially of persons who withdraw to avoid a legal process; as, an absconding debtor.

Abscond (v. t.) To hide; to conceal.

Abscondence (n.) Fugitive concealment; secret retirement; hiding.

Absconder (n.) One who absconds.

Absence (n.) A state of being absent or withdrawn from a place or from companionship; -- opposed to presence.

Absent (v. t.) To take or withdraw (one's self) to such a distance as to prevent intercourse; -- used with the reflexive pronoun.

Absentee (n.) One who absents himself from his country, office, post, or duty; especially, a landholder who lives in another country or district than that where his estate is situated; as, an Irish absentee.

Absenteeism (n.) The state or practice of an absentee; esp. the practice of absenting one's self from the country or district where one's estate is situated.

Absinthate (n.) A combination of absinthic acid with a base or positive radical.

Absinthe (n.) The plant absinthium or common wormwood.

Absinthe (n.) A strong spirituous liqueur made from wormwood and brandy or alcohol.

Absinthic (a.) Relating to the common wormwood or to an acid obtained from it.

Absinthism (n.) The condition of being poisoned by the excessive use of absinth.

Absinthium (n.) The common wormwood (Artemisia absinthium), an intensely bitter plant, used as a tonic and for making the oil of wormwood.

Absolute (a.) Loosed from any limitation or condition; uncontrolled; unrestricted; unconditional; as, absolute authority, monarchy, sovereignty, an absolute promise or command; absolute power; an absolute monarch.

Absolute (a.) Complete in itself; perfect; consummate; faultless; as, absolute perfection; absolute beauty.

Absolute (a.) Viewed apart from modifying influences or without comparison with other objects; actual; real; -- opposed to relative and comparative; as, absolute motion; absolute time or space.

Absolute (a.) Loosed from, or unconnected by, dependence on any other being; self-existent; self-sufficing.

Absolute (a.) Capable of being thought or conceived by itself alone; unconditioned; non-relative.

Absolute (a.) Pure; unmixed; as, absolute alcohol.

Absolutely (adv.) In an absolute, independent, or unconditional manner; wholly; positively.

Absolution (n.) An absolving from ecclesiastical penalties, -- for example, excommunication.

Absolutist (n.) One who believes that it is possible to realize a cognition or concept of the absolute.

Absolve (v. t.) To set free, or release, as from some obligation, debt, or responsibility, or from the consequences of guilt or such ties as it would be sin or guilt to violate; to pronounce free; as, to absolve a subject from his allegiance; to absolve an offender, which amounts to an acquittal and remission of his punishment.

Absolve (v. t.) To finish; to accomplish.

Absonant (a.) Discordant; contrary; -- opposed to consonant.

Absonous (a.) Discordant; inharmonious; incongruous.

Absorb (v. t.) To take up by cohesive, chemical, or any molecular action, as when charcoal absorbs gases. So heat, light, and electricity are absorbed or taken up in the substances into which they pass.

Absorption (n.) In living organisms, the process by which the materials of growth and nutrition are absorbed and conveyed to the tissues and organs.

Abstinent (a.) Refraining from indulgence, especially from the indulgence of appetite; abstemious; continent; temperate.

Abstract (a.) Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; -- opposed to concrete; as, honesty is an abstract word.

Abstract (a.) To separate, as ideas, by the operation of the mind; to consider by itself; to contemplate separately, as a quality or attribute.

Abstract (a.) That which comprises or concentrates in itself the essential qualities of a larger thing or of several things. Specifically: A summary or an epitome, as of a treatise or book, or of a statement; a brief.

Abstract (a.) A state of separation from other things; as, to consider a subject in the abstract, or apart from other associated things.

Abstracted (a.) Separated or disconnected; withdrawn; removed; apart.

Abstraction (a.) The act process of leaving out of consideration one or more properties of a complex object so as to attend to others; analysis. Thus, when the mind considers the form of a tree by itself, or the color of the leaves as separate from their size or figure, the act is called abstraction. So, also, when it considers whiteness, softness, virtue, existence, as separate from any particular objects.

Abstractly (adv.) In an abstract state or manner; separately; absolutely; by itself; as, matter abstractly considered.

Abstruse (a.) Remote from apprehension; difficult to be comprehended or understood; recondite; as, abstruse learning.

Absume (v. t.) To consume gradually; to waste away.

Absumption (n.) Act of wasting away; a consuming; extinction.

Absurd (a.) Contrary to reason or propriety; obviously and fiatly opposed to manifest truth; inconsistent with the plain dictates of common sense; logically contradictory; nonsensical; ridiculous; as, an absurd person, an absurd opinion; an absurd dream.

Absurdity (n.) The quality of being absurd or inconsistent with obvious truth, reason, or sound judgment.

Absurdity (n.) That which is absurd; an absurd action; a logical contradiction.

Abundance (n.) An overflowing fullness; ample sufficiency; great plenty; profusion; copious supply; superfluity; wealth: -- strictly applicable to quantity only, but sometimes used of number.

Abundant (a.) Fully sufficient; plentiful; in copious supply; -- followed by in, rarely by with.

Aburst (adv.) In a bursting condition.

Abuse (v. t.) To revile; to reproach coarsely; to disparage.

Abuse (v. t.) A corrupt practice or custom; offense; crime; fault; as, the abuses in the civil service.

Abuse (v. t.) Vituperative words; coarse, insulting speech; abusive language; virulent condemnation; reviling.

Abusion (v. t.) Evil or corrupt usage; abuse; wrong; reproach; deception; cheat.

Abusive (a.) Practicing abuse; prone to ill treat by coarse, insulting words or by other ill usage; as, an abusive author; an abusive fellow.

Abut (v. i.) To project; to terminate or border; to be contiguous; to meet; -- with on, upon, or against; as, his land abuts on the road.

Abutilon (n.) A genus of malvaceous plants of many species, found in the torrid and temperate zones of both continents; -- called also Indian mallow.

Abutment (n.) In breech-loading firearms, the block behind the barrel which receives the pressure due to recoil.

Abutter (n.) One who, or that which, abuts. Specifically, the owner of a contiguous estate; as, the abutters on a street or a river.

Acacia (n.) A genus of leguminous trees and shrubs. Nearly 300 species are Australian or Polynesian, and have terete or vertically compressed leaf stalks, instead of the bipinnate leaves of the much fewer species of America, Africa, etc. Very few are found in temperate climates.

Academian (n.) A member of an academy, university, or college.

Academic (n.) A member of an academy, college, or university; an academician.

Academicals (n. pl.) The articles of dress prescribed and worn at some colleges and universities.

Academician (n.) A collegian.

Academy (n.) A garden or grove near Athens (so named from the hero Academus), where Plato and his followers held their philosophical conferences; hence, the school of philosophy of which Plato was head.

Academy (n.) An institution for the study of higher learning; a college or a university. Popularly, a school, or seminary of learning, holding a rank between a college and a common school.

Acadian (a.) Of or pertaining to Acadie, or Nova Scotia.

Acantha (n.) The vertebral column; the spinous process of a vertebra.

Acanthocarpous (a.) Having the fruit covered with spines.

A cappella () In church or chapel style; -- said of compositions sung in the old church style, without instrumental accompaniment; as, a mass a capella, i. e., a mass purely vocal.

Acatalectic (a.) Not defective; complete; as, an acatalectic verse.

Acatalectic (n.) A verse which has the complete number of feet and syllables.

Acatalepsy (n.) Incomprehensibility of things; the doctrine held by the ancient Skeptic philosophers, that human knowledge never amounts to certainty, but only to probability.

Acataleptic (a.) Incapable of being comprehended; incomprehensible.

Acaulescent (a.) Having no stem or caulis, or only a very short one concealed in the ground.

Accadian (a.) Pertaining to a race supposed to have lived in Babylonia before the Assyrian conquest.

Accede (v. i.) To approach; to come forward; -- opposed to recede.

Accede (v. i.) To become a party by associating one's self with others; to give one's adhesion. Hence, to agree or assent to a proposal or a view; as, he acceded to my request.

Accelerograph (n.) An apparatus for studying the combustion of powder in guns, etc.

Accendibility (n.) Capacity of being kindled, or of becoming inflamed; inflammability.

Accendible (a.) Capable of being inflamed or kindled; combustible; inflammable.

Accent (n.) A mark at the right hand of a number, indicating minutes of a degree, seconds, etc.; as, 12'27'', i. e., twelve minutes twenty seven seconds.

Accentually (adv.) In an accentual manner; in accordance with accent.

Accept (v. t.) To receive with a consenting mind (something offered); as, to accept a gift; -- often followed by of.

Accept (v. t.) In a deliberate body, to receive in acquittance of a duty imposed; as, to accept the report of a committee. [This makes it the property of the body, and the question is then on its adoption.]

Acceptable (a.) Capable, worthy, or sure of being accepted or received with pleasure; pleasing to a receiver; gratifying; agreeable; welcome; as, an acceptable present, one acceptable to us.

Acceptance (n.) An assent and engagement by the person on whom a bill of exchange is drawn, to pay it when due according to the terms of the acceptance.

Acceptance (n.) An agreeing to terms or proposals by which a bargain is concluded and the parties are bound; the reception or taking of a thing bought as that for which it was bought, or as that agreed to be delivered, or the taking possession as owner.

Acceptation (n.) The meaning in which a word or expression is understood, or generally received; as, term is to be used according to its usual acceptation.

Access (n.) A coming to, or near approach; admittance; admission; accessibility; as, to gain access to a prince.

Access (n.) Admission to sexual intercourse.

Accessary (a.) Accompanying, as a subordinate; additional; accessory; esp., uniting in, or contributing to, a crime, but not as chief actor. See Accessory.

Accessary (n.) One who, not being present, contributes as an assistant or instigator to the commission of an offense.

Accession (n.) A coming to; the act of acceding and becoming joined; as, a king's accession to a confederacy.

Accession (n.) A mode of acquiring property, by which the owner of a corporeal substance which receives an addition by growth, or by labor, has a right to the part or thing added, or the improvement (provided the thing is not changed into a different species). Thus, the owner of a cow becomes the owner of her calf.

Accession (n.) The act by which one power becomes party to engagements already in force between other powers.

Accession (n.) The act of coming to or reaching a throne, an office, or dignity; as, the accession of the house of Stuart; -- applied especially to the epoch of a new dynasty.

Accession (n.) The invasion, approach, or commencement of a disease; a fit or paroxysm.

Accessoriness (n.) The state of being accessory, or connected subordinately.

Accessory (a.) Accompanying as a subordinate; aiding in a secondary way; additional; connected as an incident or subordinate to a principal; contributing or contributory; said of persons and things, and, when of persons, usually in a bad sense; as, he was accessory to the riot; accessory sounds in music.

Accident (n.) Literally, a befalling; an event that takes place without one's foresight or expectation; an undesigned, sudden, and unexpected event; chance; contingency; often, an undesigned and unforeseen occurrence of an afflictive or unfortunate character; a casualty; a mishap; as, to die by an accident.

Accident (n.) A point or mark which may be retained or omitted in a coat of arms.

Accidental (a.) Happening by chance, or unexpectedly; taking place not according to the usual course of things; casual; fortuitous; as, an accidental visit.

Accidental (n.) A sharp, flat, or natural, occurring not at the commencement of a piece of music as the signature, but before a particular note.

Accipitral (n.) Pertaining to, or of the nature of, a falcon or hawk; hawklike.

Accipitres (n. pl.) The order that includes rapacious birds. They have a hooked bill, and sharp, strongly curved talons. There are three families, represented by the vultures, the falcons or hawks, and the owls.

Accismus (n.) Affected refusal; coyness.

Acclimation (n.) The process of becoming, or the state of being, acclimated, or habituated to a new climate; acclimatization.

Acclivity (n.) A slope or inclination of the earth, as the side of a hill, considered as ascending, in opposition to declivity, or descending; an upward slope; ascent.

Accoast (v. t. & i.) To lie or sail along the coast or side of; to accost.

Accoil (v. t.) To gather together; to collect.

Accoil (v. t.) To coil together.

Accolade (n.) A ceremony formerly used in conferring knighthood, consisting am embrace, and a slight blow on the shoulders with the flat blade of a sword.

Accolade (n.) A brace used to join two or more staves.

Accombination (n.) A combining together.

Accommodable (a.) That may be accommodated, fitted, or made to agree.

Accommodableness (n.) The quality or condition of being accommodable.

Accommodated (imp. & p. p.) of Accommodate

Accommodating (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Accommodate

Accommodate (v. t.) To render fit, suitable, or correspondent; to adapt; to conform; as, to accommodate ourselves to circumstances.

Accommodate (v. t.) To bring into agreement or harmony; to reconcile; to compose; to adjust; to settle; as, to accommodate differences, a dispute, etc.

Accommodate (v. t.) To furnish with something desired, needed, or convenient; to favor; to oblige; as, to accommodate a friend with a loan or with lodgings.

Accommodate (v. t.) To show the correspondence of; to apply or make suit by analogy; to adapt or fit, as teachings to accidental circumstances, statements to facts, etc.; as, to accommodate prophecy to events.

Accommodate (v. i.) To adapt one's self; to be conformable or adapted.

Accommodate (a.) Suitable; fit; adapted; as, means accommodate to end.

Accommodately (adv.) Suitably; fitly.

Accommodateness (n.) Fitness.

Accommodating (a.) Affording, or disposed to afford, accommodation; obliging; as an accommodating man, spirit, arrangement.

Accommodation (n.) The act of fitting or adapting, or the state of being fitted or adapted; adaptation; adjustment; -- followed by to.

Accommodation (n.) Willingness to accommodate; obligingness.

Accommodation (n.) Whatever supplies a want or affords ease, refreshment, or convenience; anything furnished which is desired or needful; -- often in the plural; as, the accommodations -- that is, lodgings and food -- at an inn.

Accommodation (n.) An adjustment of differences; state of agreement; reconciliation; settlement.

Accommodation (n.) The application of a writer's language, on the ground of analogy, to something not originally referred to or intended.

Accommodation (n.) A loan of money.

Accommodation (n.) An accommodation bill or note.

Accommodator (n.) He who, or that which, accommodates.

Accompanable (a.) Sociable.

Accompanier (n.) He who, or that which, accompanies.

Accompaniment (n.) That which accompanies; something that attends as a circumstance, or which is added to give greater completeness to the principal thing, or by way of ornament, or for the sake of symmetry.

Accompaniment (n.) A part performed by instruments, accompanying another part or parts performed by voices; the subordinate part, or parts, accompanying the voice or a principal instrument; also, the harmony of a figured bass.

Accompanist (n.) The performer in music who takes the accompanying part.

Accompanied (imp. & p. p.) of Accompany

Accompanying (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Accompany

Accompany (v. t.) To go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with; -- followed by with or by; as, he accompanied his speech with a bow.

Accompany (v. t.) To cohabit with.

Accompany (v. i.) To associate in a company; to keep company.

Accompany (v. i.) To cohabit (with).

Accompany (v. i.) To perform an accompanying part or parts in a composition.

Accompletive (a.) Tending to accomplish.

Accomplice (n.) A cooperator.

Accomplice (n.) An associate in the commission of a crime; a participator in an offense, whether a principal or an accessory.

Accompliceship (n.) The state of being an accomplice.

Accomplicity (n.) The act or state of being an accomplice.

Accomplished (imp. & p. p.) of Accomplish

Accomplishing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Accomplish

Accomplish (v. t.) To complete, as time or distance.

Accomplish (v. t.) To bring to an issue of full success; to effect; to perform; to execute fully; to fulfill; as, to accomplish a design, an object, a promise.

Accomplish (v. t.) To equip or furnish thoroughly; hence, to complete in acquirements; to render accomplished; to polish.

Accomplish (v. t.) To gain; to obtain.

Accomplishable (a.) Capable of being accomplished; practicable.

Accomplished (a.) Completed; effected; established; as, an accomplished fact.

Accomplished (a.) Complete in acquirements as the result usually of training; -- commonly in a good sense; as, an accomplished scholar, an accomplished villain.

Accomplisher (n.) One who accomplishes.

Accomplishment (n.) The act of accomplishing; entire performance; completion; fulfillment; as, the accomplishment of an enterprise, of a prophecy, etc.

Accomplishment (n.) That which completes, perfects, or equips thoroughly; acquirement; attainment; that which constitutes excellence of mind, or elegance of manners, acquired by education or training.

Accompt (n.) See Account.

Accomptable (a.) See Accountable.

Accomptant (n.) See Accountant.

Accord (v. t.) Agreement or concurrence of opinion, will, or action; harmony of mind; consent; assent.

Accord (v. t.) Harmony of sounds; agreement in pitch and tone; concord; as, the accord of tones.

Accord (v. t.) Agreement, harmony, or just correspondence of things; as, the accord of light and shade in painting.

Accord (v. t.) Voluntary or spontaneous motion or impulse to act; -- preceded by own; as, of one's own accord.

Accord (v. t.) An agreement between parties in controversy, by which satisfaction for an injury is stipulated, and which, when executed, bars a suit.

Accorded (imp. & p. p.) of Accord

According (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Accord

Accord (v. t.) To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust; -- followed by to.

Accord (v. t.) To bring to an agreement, as persons; to reconcile; to settle, adjust, harmonize, or compose, as things; as, to accord suits or controversies.

Accord (v. t.) To grant as suitable or proper; to concede; to award; as, to accord to one due praise.

Accord (v. i.) To agree; to correspond; to be in harmony; -- followed by with, formerly also by to; as, his disposition accords with his looks.

Accord (v. i.) To agree in pitch and tone.

Accordable (a.) Agreeing.

Accordable (a.) Reconcilable; in accordance.

Accordance (n.) Agreement; harmony; conformity.

Accordancy (n.) Accordance.

Accordant (a.) Agreeing; consonant; harmonious; corresponding; conformable; -- followed by with or to.

Accordantly (adv.) In accordance or agreement; agreeably; conformably; -- followed by with or to.

Accorder (n.) One who accords, assents, or concedes.

According (p. a.) Agreeing; in agreement or harmony; harmonious.

According (adv.) Accordingly; correspondingly.

Accordingly (adv.) Agreeably; correspondingly; suitably; in a manner conformable.

Accordingly (adv.) In natural sequence; consequently; so.

Accordion (n.) A small, portable, keyed wind instrument, whose tones are generated by play of the wind upon free metallic reeds.

Accordionist (n.) A player on the accordion.

Accordment (v.) Agreement; reconcilement.

Accorporate (v. t.) To unite; to attach; to incorporate.

Accosted (imp. & p. p.) of Accost

Accosting (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Accost

Accost (v. t.) To join side to side; to border; hence, to sail along the coast or side of.

Accost (v. t.) To approach; to make up to.

Accost (v. t.) To speak to first; to address; to greet.

Accost (v. i.) To adjoin; to lie alongside.

Accost (n.) Address; greeting.

Accostable (a.) Approachable; affable.

Accosted (a.) Supported on both sides by other charges; also, side by side.

Accouchement (n.) Delivery in childbed

Accoucheur (n.) A man who assists women in childbirth; a man midwife; an obstetrician.

Accoucheuse (n.) A midwife.

Account (n.) A reckoning; computation; calculation; enumeration; a record of some reckoning; as, the Julian account of time.

Account (n.) A registry of pecuniary transactions; a written or printed statement of business dealings or debts and credits, and also of other things subjected to a reckoning or review; as, to keep one's account at the bank.

Account (n.) A statement in general of reasons, causes, grounds, etc., explanatory of some event; as, no satisfactory account has been given of these phenomena. Hence, the word is often used simply for reason, ground, consideration, motive, etc.; as, on no account, on every account, on all accounts.

Account (n.) A statement of facts or occurrences; recital of transactions; a relation or narrative; a report; a description; as, an account of a battle.

Account (n.) A statement and explanation or vindication of one's conduct with reference to judgment thereon.

Account (n.) An estimate or estimation; valuation; judgment.

Account (n.) Importance; worth; value; advantage; profit.

Accounted (imp. & p. p.) of Account

Accounting (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Account

Account (v. t.) To reckon; to compute; to count.

Account (v. t.) To place to one's account; to put to the credit of; to assign; -- with to.

Account (v. t.) To value, estimate, or hold in opinion; to judge or consider; to deem.

Account (v. t.) To recount; to relate.

Account (v. i.) To render or receive an account or relation of particulars; as, an officer must account with or to the treasurer for money received.

Account (v. i.) To render an account; to answer in judgment; -- with for; as, we must account for the use of our opportunities.

Account (v. i.) To give a satisfactory reason; to tell the cause of; to explain; -- with for; as, idleness accounts for poverty.

Accountability (n.) The state of being accountable; liability to be called on to render an account; accountableness.

Accountable (a.) Liable to be called on to render an account; answerable; as, every man is accountable to God for his conduct.

Accountable (a.) Capable of being accounted for; explicable.

Accountable ness (n.) The quality or state of being accountable; accountability.

Accountably (adv.) In an accountable manner.

Accountancy (n.) The art or employment of an accountant.

Accountant (n.) One who renders account; one accountable.

Accountant (n.) A reckoner.

Accountant (n.) One who is skilled in, keeps, or adjusts, accounts; an officer in a public office, who has charge of the accounts.

Accountant (a.) Accountable.

Accountantship (n.) The office or employment of an accountant.

Account book () A book in which accounts are kept.

Accouple (v. t.) To join; to couple.

Accouplement (n.) The act of coupling, or the state of being coupled; union.

Accouplement (n.) That which couples, as a tie or brace.

Accourage (v. t.) To encourage.

Accourt (v. t.) To treat courteously; to court.

Accoutered (imp. & p. p.) of Accoutre

Accoutred () of Accoutre

Accoutering (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Accoutre

Accoutring () of Accoutre

Accouter (v. t.) Alt. of Accoutre

Accoutre (v. t.) To furnish with dress, or equipments, esp. those for military service; to equip; to attire; to array.

Accouterments (n. pl.) Alt. of Accoutrements

Accoutrements (n. pl.) Dress; trappings; equipment; specifically, the devices and equipments worn by soldiers.

Accoy (v. t.) To render quiet; to soothe.

Accoy (v. t.) To subdue; to tame; to daunt.

Accredit (v. t.) To credit; to vouch for or consider (some one) as doing something, or (something) as belonging to some one.

Accretion (n.) Concretion; coherence of separate particles; as, the accretion of particles so as to form a solid mass.

Accretion (n.) The adhering of property to something else, by which the owner of one thing becomes possessed of a right to another; generally, gain of land by the washing up of sand or sail from the sea or a river, or by a gradual recession of the water from the usual watermark.

Accretion (n.) Gain to an heir or legatee, failure of a coheir to the same succession, or a co-legatee of the same thing, to take his share.

Accrue (n.) To come to by way of increase; to arise or spring as a growth or result; to be added as increase, profit, or damage, especially as the produce of money lent.

Accubation (n.) The act or posture of reclining on a couch, as practiced by the ancients at meals.

Accumulate (v. t.) To heap up in a mass; to pile up; to collect or bring together; to amass; as, to accumulate a sum of money.

Accumulation (n.) The concurrence of several titles to the same proof.

Accumulative (a.) Characterized by accumulation; serving to collect or amass; cumulative; additional.

Accumulator (n.) One who, or that which, accumulates, collects, or amasses.

Accumulator (n.) An apparatus by means of which energy or power can be stored, such as the cylinder or tank for storing water for hydraulic elevators, the secondary or storage battery used for accumulating the energy of electrical charges, etc.

Accuracy (n.) The state of being accurate; freedom from mistakes, this exemption arising from carefulness; exact conformity to truth, or to a rule or model; precision; exactness; nicety; correctness; as, the value of testimony depends on its accuracy.

Accurate (a.) In exact or careful conformity to truth, or to some standard of requirement, the result of care or pains; free from failure, error, or defect; exact; as, an accurate calculator; an accurate measure; accurate expression, knowledge, etc.

Accusation (n.) That of which one is accused; the charge of an offense or crime, or the declaration containing the charge.

Accusative (a.) Applied to the case (as the fourth case of Latin and Greek nouns) which expresses the immediate object on which the action or influence of a transitive verb terminates, or the immediate object of motion or tendency to, expressed by a preposition. It corresponds to the objective case in English.

Accusatory (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, an accusation; as, an accusatory libel.

Accuse (v. t.) To charge with, or declare to have committed, a crime or offense

Accustom (v. i.) To cohabit.

Accustomably (adv.) According to custom; ordinarily; customarily.

Acephali (n. pl.) Bishops and certain clergymen not under regular diocesan control.

Acerate (n.) A combination of aceric acid with a salifiable base.

Acervate (a.) Heaped, or growing in heaps, or closely compacted clusters.

Acescent (a.) Turning sour; readily becoming tart or acid; slightly sour.

Acescent (n.) A substance liable to become sour.

Acetal (n.) A limpid, colorless, inflammable liquid from the slow oxidation of alcohol under the influence of platinum black.

Acetanilide (n.) A compound of aniline with acetyl, used to allay fever or pain; -- called also antifebrine.

Acetic (a.) Pertaining to, containing, or derived from, acetyl, as acetic ether, acetic acid. The latter is the acid to which the sour taste of vinegar is due.

Acetification (n.) The act of making acetous or sour; the process of converting, or of becoming converted, into vinegar.

Acetify (v. t.) To convert into acid or vinegar.

Acetimeter (n.) An instrument for estimating the amount of acetic acid in vinegar or in any liquid containing acetic acid.

Acetimetry (n.) The act or method of ascertaining the strength of vinegar, or the proportion of acetic acid contained in it.

Acetin (n.) A combination of acetic acid with glycerin.

Acetone (n.) A volatile liquid consisting of three parts of carbon, six of hydrogen, and one of oxygen; pyroacetic spirit, -- obtained by the distillation of certain acetates, or by the destructive distillation of citric acid, starch, sugar, or gum, with quicklime.

Acetous (a.) Causing, or connected with, acetification; as, acetous fermentation.

Acetyl (n.) A complex, hypothetical radical, composed of two parts of carbon to three of hydrogen and one of oxygen. Its hydroxide is acetic acid.

Acetylene (n.) A gaseous compound of carbon and hydrogen, in the proportion of two atoms of the former to two of the latter. It is a colorless gas, with a peculiar, unpleasant odor, and is produced for use as an illuminating gas in a number of ways, but chiefly by the action of water on calcium carbide. Its light is very brilliant.

Achatina (n.) A genus of land snails, often large, common in the warm parts of America and Africa.

Ache (v. i.) To suffer pain; to have, or be in, pain, or in continued pain; to be distressed.

Achenium (n.) A small, dry, indehiscent fruit, containing a single seed, as in the buttercup; -- called a naked seed by the earlier botanists.

Achieve (v. t.) To carry on to a final close; to bring out into a perfected state; to accomplish; to perform; -- as, to achieve a feat, an exploit, an enterprise.

Achievement (n.) The act of achieving or performing; an obtaining by exertion; successful performance; accomplishment; as, the achievement of his object.

Achievement (n.) A great or heroic deed; something accomplished by valor, boldness, or praiseworthy exertion; a feat.

Achievement (n.) An escutcheon or ensign armorial; now generally applied to the funeral shield commonly called hatchment.

Achilles' tendon (n.) The strong tendon formed of the united tendons of the large muscles in the calf of the leg, an inserted into the bone of the heel; -- so called from the mythological account of Achilles being held by the heel when dipped in the River Styx.

Aching (a.) That aches; continuously painful. See Ache.

Achiote (n.) Seeds of the annotto tree; also, the coloring matter, annotto.

Achlamydeous (a.) Naked; having no floral envelope, neither calyx nor corolla.

Achromatic (a.) Free from color; transmitting light without decomposing it into its primary colors.

Achromatic (a.) Uncolored; not absorbing color from a fluid; -- said of tissue.

Achromatize (v. t.) To deprive of color; to make achromatic.

Achromatopsy (n.) Color blindness; inability to distinguish colors; Daltonism.

Achroodextrin (n.) Dextrin not colorable by iodine. See Dextrin.

Acid (n.) One of a class of compounds, generally but not always distinguished by their sour taste, solubility in water, and reddening of vegetable blue or violet colors. They are also characterized by the power of destroying the distinctive properties of alkalies or bases, combining with them to form salts, at the same time losing their own peculiar properties. They all contain hydrogen, united with a more negative element or radical, either alone, or more generally with oxygen, and take their names from this negative element or radical. Those which contain no oxygen are sometimes called hydracids in distinction from the others which are called oxygen acids or oxacids.

Acidifiable (a.) Capable of being acidified, or converted into an acid.

Acidific (a.) Producing acidity; converting into an acid.

Acidifier (n.) A simple or compound principle, whose presence is necessary to produce acidity, as oxygen, chlorine, bromine, iodine, etc.

Acidify (v. t.) To make acid; to convert into an acid; as, to acidify sugar.

Acidimetry (n.) The measurement of the strength of acids, especially by a chemical process based on the law of chemical combinations, or the fact that, to produce a complete reaction, a certain definite weight of reagent is required.

Acierage (n.) The process of coating the surface of a metal plate (as a stereotype plate) with steellike iron by means of voltaic electricity; steeling.

Acinous (a.) Consisting of acini, or minute granular concretions; as, acinose or acinous glands.

Acinus (n.) One of the granular masses which constitute a racemose or compound gland, as the pancreas; also, one of the saccular recesses in the lobules of a racemose gland.

Acknow (v. t.) To recognize.

Acknow (v. t.) To acknowledge; to confess.

Acknowledge (v. t.) To of or admit the knowledge of; to recognize as a fact or truth; to declare one's belief in; as, to acknowledge the being of a God.

Acknowledge (v. t.) To own or recognize in a particular character or relationship; to admit the claims or authority of; to give recognition to.

Acknowledgment (n.) The act of acknowledging; admission; avowal; owning; confession.

Acknowledgment (n.) The act of owning or recognized in a particular character or relationship; recognition as regards the existence, authority, truth, or genuineness.

Acknowledgment (n.) The owning of a benefit received; courteous recognition; expression of thanks.

Acnode (n.) An isolated point not upon a curve, but whose coordinates satisfy the equation of the curve so that it is considered as belonging to the curve.

Acock (adv.) In a cocked or turned up fashion.

Acockbill (adv.) Hanging at the cathead, ready to let go, as an anchor.

Acockbill (adv.) Topped up; having one yardarm higher than the other.

Acold (a.) Cold.

Acologic (a.) Pertaining to acology.

Acology (n.) Materia medica; the science of remedies.

Acolothist (n.) See Acolythist.

Acolyctine (n.) An organic base, in the form of a white powder, obtained from Aconitum lycoctonum.

Acolyte (n.) One who has received the highest of the four minor orders in the Catholic church, being ordained to carry the wine and water and the lights at the Mass.

Acolyte (n.) One who attends; an assistant.

Acolyth (n.) Same as Acolyte.

Acolythist (n.) An acolyte.

Aconddylose (a.) Alt. of Acondylous

Acondylous (a.) Being without joints; jointless.

Aconital (a.) Of the nature of aconite.

Aconite (n.) The herb wolfsbane, or monkshood; -- applied to any plant of the genus Aconitum (tribe Hellebore), all the species of which are poisonous.

Aconite (n.) An extract or tincture obtained from Aconitum napellus, used as a poison and medicinally.

Aconitia (n.) Same as Aconitine.

Aconitic (a.) Of or pertaining to aconite.

Aconitine (n.) An intensely poisonous alkaloid, extracted from aconite.

Aconitum (n.) The poisonous herb aconite; also, an extract from it.

Acontia (n. pl.) Threadlike defensive organs, composed largely of nettling cells (cnidae), thrown out of the mouth or special pores of certain Actiniae when irritated.

Acontias (n.) Anciently, a snake, called dart snake; now, one of a genus of reptiles closely allied to the lizards.

Acopic (a.) Relieving weariness; restorative.

Acorn (n.) The fruit of the oak, being an oval nut growing in a woody cup or cupule.

Acorn (n.) A cone-shaped piece of wood on the point of the spindle above the vane, on the mast-head.

Acorn (n.) See Acorn-shell.

Acorn cup () The involucre or cup in which the acorn is fixed.

Acorned (a.) Furnished or loaded with acorns.

Acorned (a.) Fed or filled with acorns.

Acorn-shell (n.) One of the sessile cirripeds; a barnacle of the genus Balanus. See Barnacle.

Acosmism (n.) A denial of the existence of the universe as distinct from God.

Acosmist (n.) One who denies the existence of the universe, or of a universe as distinct from God.

Acotyledon (n.) A plant which has no cotyledons, as the dodder and all flowerless plants.

Acotyledonous (a.) Having no seed lobes, as the dodder; also applied to plants which have no true seeds, as ferns, mosses, etc.

Acouchy (n.) A small species of agouti (Dasyprocta acouchy).

Acoumeter (n.) An instrument for measuring the acuteness of the sense of hearing.

Acoumetry (n.) The measuring of the power or extent of hearing.

Acoustic (a.) Pertaining to the sense of hearing, the organs of hearing, or the science of sounds; auditory.

Acoustic (n.) A medicine or agent to assist hearing.

Acoustical (a.) Of or pertaining to acoustics.

Acoustically (adv.) In relation to sound or to hearing.

Acoustician (n.) One versed in acoustics.

Acoustics (n.) The science of sounds, teaching their nature, phenomena, and laws.

Acquaint (v. t.) To communicate notice to; to inform; to make cognizant; -- followed by with (formerly, also, by of), or by that, introducing the intelligence; as, to acquaint a friend with the particulars of an act.

Acquaintance (n.) A state of being acquainted, or of having intimate, or more than slight or superficial, knowledge; personal knowledge gained by intercourse short of that of friendship or intimacy; as, I know the man; but have no acquaintance with him.

Acquiesce (v. i.) To rest satisfied, or apparently satisfied, or to rest without opposition and discontent (usually implying previous opposition or discontent); to accept or consent by silence or by omitting to object; -- followed by in, formerly also by with and to.

Acquiesce (v. i.) To concur upon conviction; as, to acquiesce in an opinion; to assent to; usually, to concur, not heartily but so far as to forbear opposition.

Acquiescence (n.) A silent or passive assent or submission, or a submission with apparent content; -- distinguished from avowed consent on the one hand, and on the other, from opposition or open discontent; quiet satisfaction.

Acquiescence (n.) Tacit concurrence in the action of another.

Acquit (v. t.) To bear or conduct one's self; to perform one's part; as, the soldier acquitted himself well in battle; the orator acquitted himself very poorly.

Acquittal (n.) A setting free, or deliverance from the charge of an offense, by verdict of a jury or sentence of a court.

Acraspeda (n. pl.) A group of acalephs, including most of the larger jellyfishes; the Discophora.

Acre (n.) A piece of land, containing 160 square rods, or 4,840 square yards, or 43,560 square feet. This is the English statute acre. That of the United States is the same. The Scotch acre was about 1.26 of the English, and the Irish 1.62 of the English.

Acreage (n.) Acres collectively; as, the acreage of a farm or a country.

Acred (a.) Possessing acres or landed property; -- used in composition; as, large-acred men.

Acrid (a.) Causing heat and irritation; corrosive; as, acrid secretions.

Acrimonious (a.) Acrid; corrosive; as, acrimonious gall.

Acrimony (n.) A quality of bodies which corrodes or destroys others; also, a harsh or biting sharpness; as, the acrimony of the juices of certain plants.

Acrolein (n.) A limpid, colorless, highly volatile liquid, obtained by the dehydration of glycerin, or the destructive distillation of neutral fats containing glycerin. Its vapors are intensely irritating.

Acronychal (a.) Rising at sunset and setting at sunrise, as a star; -- opposed to cosmical.

Acrostic (n.) A composition, usually in verse, in which the first or the last letters of the lines, or certain other letters, taken in order, form a name, word, phrase, or motto.

Acrylic (a.) Of or containing acryl, the hypothetical radical of which acrolein is the hydride; as, acrylic acid.

Act (n.) The result of public deliberation; the decision or determination of a legislative body, council, court of justice, etc.; a decree, edit, law, judgment, resolve, award; as, an act of Parliament, or of Congress.

Act (n.) A performance of part of a play; one of the principal divisions of a play or dramatic work in which a certain definite part of the action is completed.

Act (v. t.) To feign or counterfeit; to simulate.

Act (v. i.) To behave or conduct, as in morals, private duties, or public offices; to bear or deport one's self; as, we know not why he has acted so.

Actinal (a.) Pertaining to the part of a radiate animal which contains the mouth.

Actinaria (n. pl.) A large division of Anthozoa, including those which have simple tentacles and do not form stony corals. Sometimes, in a wider sense, applied to all the Anthozoa, expert the Alcyonaria, whether forming corals or not.

Actinia (n.) An animal of the class Anthozoa, and family Actinidae. From a resemblance to flowers in form and color, they are often called animal flowers and sea anemones. [See Polyp.].

Actinium (n.) A supposed metal, said by Phipson to be contained in commercial zinc; -- so called because certain of its compounds are darkened by exposure to light.

Actinograph (n.) An instrument for measuring and recording the variations in the actinic or chemical force of rays of light.

Actinolite (n.) A bright green variety of amphibole occurring usually in fibrous or columnar masses.

Actinolitic (a.) Of the nature of, or containing, actinolite.

Actinomere (n.) One of the radial segments composing the body of one of the Coelenterata.

Actinosome (n.) The entire body of a coelenterate.

Actinostome (n.) The mouth or anterior opening of a coelenterate animal.

Actinozoa (n. pl.) A group of Coelenterata, comprising the Anthozoa and Ctenophora. The sea anemone, or actinia, is a familiar example.

Action (n.) A process or condition of acting or moving, as opposed to rest; the doing of something; exertion of power or force, as when one body acts on another; the effect of power exerted on one body by another; agency; activity; operation; as, the action of heat; a man of action.

Action (n.) An act; a thing done; a deed; an enterprise. (pl.): Habitual deeds; hence, conduct; behavior; demeanor.

Action (n.) The event or connected series of events, either real or imaginary, forming the subject of a play, poem, or other composition; the unfolding of the drama of events.

Action (n.) Gesticulation; the external deportment of the speaker, or the suiting of his attitude, voice, gestures, and countenance, to the subject, or to the feelings.

Action (n.) A suit or process, by which a demand is made of a right in a court of justice; in a broad sense, a judicial proceeding for the enforcement or protection of a right, the redress or prevention of a wrong, or the punishment of a public offense.

Action (n.) A share in the capital stock of a joint-stock company, or in the public funds; hence, in the plural, equivalent to stocks.

Action (n.) The mechanical contrivance by means of which the impulse of the player's finger is transmitted to the strings of a pianoforte or to the valve of an organ pipe.

Actionist (n.) A shareholder in joint-stock company.

Active (a.) Having the power or quality of acting; causing change; communicating action or motion; acting; -- opposed to passive, that receives; as, certain active principles; the powers of the mind.

Active (a.) Given to action; constantly engaged in action; energetic; diligent; busy; -- opposed to dull, sluggish, indolent, or inert; as, an active man of business; active mind; active zeal.

Active (a.) Given to action rather than contemplation; practical; operative; -- opposed to speculative or theoretical; as, an active rather than a speculative statesman.

Active (a.) Brisk; lively; as, an active demand for corn.

Actor (n.) An advocate or proctor in civil courts or causes.

Actor (n.) One who institutes a suit; plaintiff or complainant.

Actual (a.) Involving or comprising action; active.

Actual (a.) Existing in act or reality; really acted or acting; in fact; real; -- opposed to potential, possible, virtual, speculative, conceivable, theoretical, or nominal; as, the actual cost of goods; the actual case under discussion.

Actual (a.) In action at the time being; now exiting; present; as the actual situation of the country.

Actualist (n.) One who deals with or considers actually existing facts and conditions, rather than fancies or theories; -- opposed to idealist.

Actuary (n.) A registrar or clerk; -- used originally in courts of civil law jurisdiction, but in Europe used for a clerk or registrar generally.

Actuary (n.) The computing official of an insurance company; one whose profession it is to calculate for insurance companies the risks and premiums for life, fire, and other insurances.

Actuate (v. t.) To put into action or motion; to move or incite to action; to influence actively; to move as motives do; -- more commonly used of persons.

Aculeate (a.) Having a sting; covered with prickles; sharp like a prickle.

Acuminate (v. i.) To end in, or come to, a sharp point.

Acute (a.) Attended with symptoms of some degree of severity, and coming speedily to a crisis; -- opposed to chronic; as, an acute disease.

Ad- () As a prefix ad- assumes the forms ac-, af-, ag-, al-, an-, ap-, ar-, as-, at-, assimilating the d with the first letter of the word to which ad- is prefixed. It remains unchanged before vowels, and before d, h, j, m, v. Examples: adduce, adhere, adjacent, admit, advent, accord, affect, aggregate, allude, annex, appear, etc. It becomes ac- before qu, as in acquiesce.

Adact (v. t.) To compel; to drive.

Adapter (n.) A connecting tube; an adopter.

Adar (n.) The twelfth month of the Hebrew ecclesiastical year, and the sixth of the civil. It corresponded nearly with March.

Adarce (n.) A saltish concretion on reeds and grass in marshy grounds in Galatia. It is soft and porous, and was formerly used for cleansing the skin from freckles and tetters, and also in leprosy.

Adatis (n.) A fine cotton cloth of India.

Add (v. t.) To join or unite, as one thing to another, or as several particulars, so as to increase the number, augment the quantity, enlarge the magnitude, or so as to form into one aggregate. Hence: To sum up; to put together mentally; as, to add numbers; to add up a column.

Adder (n.) A small venomous serpent of the genus Vipera. The common European adder is the Vipera (/ Pelias) berus. The puff adders of Africa are species of Clotho.

Adder (n.) In America, the term is commonly applied to several harmless snakes, as the milk adder, puffing adder, etc.

Adderwort (n.) The common bistort or snakeweed (Polygonum bistorta).

Addison's disease () A morbid condition causing a peculiar brownish discoloration of the skin, and thought, at one time, to be due to disease of the suprarenal capsules (two flat triangular bodies covering the upper part of the kidneys), but now known not to be dependent upon this causes exclusively. It is usually fatal.

Addition (n.) Something added to a coat of arms, as a mark of honor; -- opposed to abatement.

Addle (a.) Having lost the power of development, and become rotten, as eggs; putrid. Hence: Unfruitful or confused, as brains; muddled.

Address (v.) To direct speech to; to make a communication to, whether spoken or written; to apply to by words, as by a speech, petition, etc., to speak to; to accost.

Address (v.) To make suit to as a lover; to court; to woo.

Address (v.) To consign or intrust to the care of another, as agent or factor; as, the ship was addressed to a merchant in Baltimore.

Address (v. t.) A formal communication, either written or spoken; a discourse; a speech; a formal application to any one; a petition; a formal statement on some subject or special occasion; as, an address of thanks, an address to the voters.

Addression (n.) The act of addressing or directing one's course.

Adduce (v. t.) To bring forward or offer, as an argument, passage, or consideration which bears on a statement or case; to cite; to allege.

Adduct (v. t.) To draw towards a common center or a middle line.

Adelantado (n.) A governor of a province; a commander.

Adelocodonic (a.) Applied to sexual zooids of hydroids, that have a saclike form and do not become free; -- opposed to phanerocodonic.

Adelphia (n.) A "brotherhood," or collection of stamens in a bundle; -- used in composition, as in the class names, Monadelphia, Diadelphia, etc.

Adelphous (a.) Having coalescent or clustered filaments; -- said of stamens; as, adelphous stamens. Usually in composition; as, monadelphous.

Adept (a.) Well skilled; completely versed; thoroughly proficient.

Adequate (a.) Equal to some requirement; proportionate, or correspondent; fully sufficient; as, powers adequate to a great work; an adequate definition.

Adesmy (n.) The division or defective coherence of an organ that is usually entire.

Adhere (v. i.) To stick fast or cleave, as a glutinous substance does; to become joined or united; as, wax to the finger; the lungs sometimes adhere to the pleura.

Adhere (v. i.) To hold, be attached, or devoted; to remain fixed, either by personal union or conformity of faith, principle, or opinion; as, men adhere to a party, a cause, a leader, a church.

Adhere (v. i.) To be consistent or coherent; to be in accordance; to agree.

Adhesion (n.) Agreement to adhere; concurrence; assent.

Adhesion (n.) The molecular attraction exerted between bodies in contact. See Cohesion.

Adhesiveness (n.) Propensity to form and maintain attachments to persons, and to promote social intercourse.

Adhortatory (a.) Containing counsel or warning; hortatory; advisory.

Adiaphorist (n.) One of the German Protestants who, with Melanchthon, held some opinions and ceremonies to be indifferent or nonessential, which Luther condemned as sinful or heretical.

Adieu (n.) A farewell; commendation to the care of God at parting.

Adipescent (a.) Becoming fatty.

Adipocerate (v. t.) To convert into adipocere.

Adipocere (n.) A soft, unctuous, or waxy substance, of a light brown color, into which the fat and muscle tissue of dead bodies sometimes are converted, by long immersion in water or by burial in moist places. It is a result of fatty degeneration.

Adjacency () The state of being adjacent or contiguous; contiguity; as, the adjacency of lands or buildings.

Adjacent (a.) Lying near, close, or contiguous; neighboring; bordering on; as, a field adjacent to the highway.

Adjoin (v. t.) To join or unite to; to lie contiguous to; to be in contact with; to attach; to append.

Adjoin (v. i.) To lie or be next, or in contact; to be contiguous; as, the houses adjoin.

Adjoining (a.) Joining to; contiguous; adjacent; as, an adjoining room.

Adjourn (v. t.) To put off or defer to another day, or indefinitely; to postpone; to close or suspend for the day; -- commonly said of the meeting, or the action, of convened body; as, to adjourn the meeting; to adjourn a debate.

Adjourn (v. i.) To suspend business for a time, as from one day to another, or for a longer period, or indefinitely; usually, to suspend public business, as of legislatures and courts, or other convened bodies; as, congress adjourned at four o'clock; the court adjourned without day.

Adjudge (v. t.) To award judicially in the case of a controverted question; as, the prize was adjudged to the victor.

Adjudge (v. t.) To sentence; to condemn.

Adjudicate (v. t.) To adjudge; to try and determine, as a court; to settle by judicial decree.

Adjudicate (v. i.) To come to a judicial decision; as, the court adjudicated upon the case.

Adjunct (a.) Conjoined; attending; consequent.

Adjunct (n.) A person joined to another in some duty or service; a colleague; an associate.

Adjunct (n.) A quality or property of the body or the mind, whether natural or acquired; as, color, in the body, judgment in the mind.

Adjunctly (adv.) By way of addition or adjunct; in connection with.

Adjure (v. t.) To charge, bind, or command, solemnly, as if under oath, or under the penalty of a curse; to appeal to in the most solemn or impressive manner; to entreat earnestly.

Adjust (v. t.) To make exact; to fit; to make correspondent or conformable; to bring into proper relations; as, to adjust a garment to the body, or things to a standard.

Adjust (v. t.) To settle or bring to a satisfactory state, so that parties are agreed in the result; as, to adjust accounts; the differences are adjusted.

Adjust (v. t.) To bring to a true relative position, as the parts of an instrument; to regulate for use; as, to adjust a telescope or microscope.

Adjustment (n.) The act of adjusting, or condition of being adjusted; act of bringing into proper relations; regulation.

Adjustment (n.) Settlement of claims; an equitable arrangement of conflicting claims, as in set-off, contribution, exoneration, subrogation, and marshaling.

Adjustment (n.) The operation of bringing all the parts of an instrument, as a microscope or telescope, into their proper relative position for use; the condition of being thus adjusted; as, to get a good adjustment; to be in or out of adjustment.

Adjutant (n.) A regimental staff officer, who assists the colonel, or commanding officer of a garrison or regiment, in the details of regimental and garrison duty.

Adjutant (n.) A species of very large stork (Ciconia argala), a native of India; -- called also the gigantic crane, and by the native name argala. It is noted for its serpent-destroying habits.

Adjutator (n.) A corruption of Agitator.

Adlegation (n.) A right formerly claimed by the states of the German Empire of joining their own ministers with those of the emperor in public treaties and negotiations to the common interest of the empire.

Admeasure (v. t.) To determine the proper share of, or the proper apportionment; as, to admeasure dower; to admeasure common of pasture.

Admeasure (v. t.) Formerly, the adjustment of proportion, or ascertainment of shares, as of dower or pasture held in common. This was by writ of admeasurement, directed to the sheriff.

Adminicular (a.) Supplying help; auxiliary; corroborative; explanatory; as, adminicular evidence.

Administer (v. t.) To manage or conduct, as public affairs; to direct or superintend the execution, application, or conduct of; as, to administer the government or the state.

Administer (v. i.) To contribute; to bring aid or supplies; to conduce; to minister.

Administration (n.) The act of administering; government of public affairs; the service rendered, or duties assumed, in conducting affairs; the conducting of any office or employment; direction; management.

Administration (n.) The executive part of government; the persons collectively who are intrusted with the execution of laws and the superintendence of public affairs; the chief magistrate and his cabinet or council; or the council, or ministry, alone, as in Great Britain.

Administration (n.) The management and disposal, under legal authority, of the estate of an intestate, or of a testator having no competent executor.

Administration (n.) The management of an estate of a deceased person by an executor, the strictly corresponding term execution not being in use.

Administrator (n.) A man who manages or settles the estate of an intestate, or of a testator when there is no competent executor; one to whom the right of administration has been committed by competent authority.

Admiral (n.) A naval officer of the highest rank; a naval officer of high rank, of which there are different grades. The chief gradations in rank are admiral, vice admiral, and rear admiral. The admiral is the commander in chief of a fleet or of fleets.

Admiral (n.) The ship which carries the admiral; also, the most considerable ship of a fleet.

Admiralty (n.) The court which has jurisdiction of maritime questions and offenses.

Admiralty (n.) The system of jurisprudence of admiralty courts.

Admissible (a.) Entitled to be admitted, or worthy of being admitted; that may be allowed or conceded; allowable; as, the supposition is hardly admissible.

Admission (n.) The granting of an argument or position not fully proved; the act of acknowledging something /serted; acknowledgment; concession.

Admission (n.) Acquiescence or concurrence in a statement made by another, and distinguishable from a confession in that an admission presupposes prior inquiry by another, but a confession may be made without such inquiry.

Admission (n.) A fact, point, or statement admitted; as, admission made out of court are received in evidence.

Admit (v. t.) To suffer to enter; to grant entrance, whether into a place, or into the mind, or consideration; to receive; to take; as, they were into his house; to admit a serious thought into the mind; to admit evidence in the trial of a cause.

Admit (v. t.) To allow (one) to enter on an office or to enjoy a privilege; to recognize as qualified for a franchise; as, to admit an attorney to practice law; the prisoner was admitted to bail.

Admit (v. t.) To concede as true; to acknowledge or assent to, as an allegation which it is impossible to deny; to own or confess; as, the argument or fact is admitted; he admitted his guilt.

Admit (v. t.) To be capable of; to permit; as, the words do not admit such a construction. In this sense, of may be used after the verb, or may be omitted.

Admittance (n.) The act of giving possession of a copyhold estate.

Admittatur (n.) The certificate of admission given in some American colleges.

Admixture (n.) The compound formed by mixing different substances together.

Admonish (v. t.) To counsel against wrong practices; to cation or advise; to warn against danger or an offense; -- followed by of, against, or a subordinate clause.

Admonition (n.) Gentle or friendly reproof; counseling against a fault or error; expression of authoritative advice; friendly caution or warning.

Admonitory (a.) That conveys admonition; warning or reproving; as, an admonitory glance.

Admove (v. t.) To move or conduct to or toward.

Adnate (a.) Grown to congenitally.

Adnate (a.) Growing together; -- said only of organic cohesion of unlike parts.

Adnate (a.) Growing with one side adherent to a stem; -- a term applied to the lateral zooids of corals and other compound animals.

Adnation (n.) The adhesion or cohesion of different floral verticils or sets of organs.

Adobe (n.) An unburnt brick dried in the sun; also used as an adjective, as, an adobe house, in Texas or New Mexico.

Adolescence (n.) The state of growing up from childhood to manhood or womanhood; youth, or the period of life between puberty and maturity, generally considered to be, in the male sex, from fourteen to twenty-one. Sometimes used with reference to the lower animals.

Adonis (n.) A genus of plants of the family Ranunculaceae, containing the pheasant's eye (Adonis autumnalis); -- named from Adonis, whose blood was fabled to have stained the flower.

Adopted (a.) Taken by adoption; taken up as one's own; as, an adopted son, citizen, country, word.

Adoration (n.) A method of electing a pope by the expression of homage from two thirds of the conclave.

Adorn (a.) Adorned; decorated.

Adorningly (adv.) By adorning; decoratively.

Adornment (n.) An adorning; an ornament; a decoration.

Adosculation (n.) Impregnation by external contact, without intromission.

Adrift (adv. & a.) Floating at random; in a drifting condition; at the mercy of wind and waves. Also fig.

Adry (a.) In a dry or thirsty condition.

Adularia (n.) A transparent or translucent variety of common feldspar, or orthoclase, which often shows pearly opalescent reflections; -- called by lapidaries moonstone.

Adulatory (a.) Containing excessive praise or compliment; servilely praising; flattering; as, an adulatory address.

Adulter (v. i.) To commit adultery; to pollute.

Adulterate (v. t.) To corrupt, debase, or make impure by an admixture of a foreign or a baser substance; as, to adulterate food, drink, drugs, coin, etc.

Adulterate (v. i.) To commit adultery.

Adulteration (n.) The act of adulterating; corruption, or debasement (esp. of food or drink) by foreign mixture.

Adulterator (n.) One who adulterates or corrupts.

Adulterer (n.) A man who commits adultery; a married man who has sexual intercourse with a woman not his wife.

Adulterer (n.) A man who violates his religious covenant.

Adulteress (n.) A woman who commits adultery.

Adulterine (a.) Proceeding from adulterous intercourse. Hence: Spurious; without the support of law; illegal.

Adulterize (v. i.) To commit adultery.

Adultery (n.) The unfaithfulness of a married person to the marriage bed; sexual intercourse by a married man with another than his wife, or voluntary sexual intercourse by a married woman with another than her husband.

Adultery (n.) Adulteration; corruption.

Adultery (n.) Lewdness or unchastity of thought as well as act, as forbidden by the seventh commandment.

Aduncous (a.) Curved inwards; hooked.

Adust (a.) Inflamed or scorched; fiery.

Adust (a.) Looking as if or scorched; sunburnt.

Adust (a.) Having much heat in the constitution and little serum in the blood. [Obs.] Hence: Atrabilious; sallow; gloomy.

Advance (v. t.) To furnish, as money or other value, before it becomes due, or in aid of an enterprise; to supply beforehand; as, a merchant advances money on a contract or on goods consigned to him.

Advance (v. i.) To rise in rank, office, or consequence; to be preferred or promoted.

Advance (v.) An addition to the price; rise in price or value; as, an advance on the prime cost of goods.

Advance (a.) Before in place, or beforehand in time; -- used for advanced; as, an advance guard, or that before the main guard or body of an army; advance payment, or that made before it is due; advance proofs, advance sheets, pages of a forthcoming volume, received in advance of the time of publication.

Advancer (n.) A second branch of a buck's antler.

Advantage (n.) Any condition, circumstance, opportunity, or means, particularly favorable to success, or to any desired end; benefit; as, the enemy had the advantage of a more elevated position.

Advantage (n.) Superiority of state, or that which gives it; benefit; gain; profit; as, the advantage of a good constitution.

Advantageous (a.) Being of advantage; conferring advantage; gainful; profitable; useful; beneficial; as, an advantageous position; trade is advantageous to a nation.

Advene (v. i.) To accede, or come (to); to be added to something or become a part of it, though not essential.

Advent (n.) The first or the expected second coming of Christ.

Adventist (n.) One of a religious body, embracing several branches, who look for the proximate personal coming of Christ; -- called also Second Adventists.

Adventitious (a.) Accidentally or sparingly spontaneous in a country or district; not fully naturalized; adventive; -- applied to foreign plants.

Adventive (n.) A thing or person coming from without; an immigrant.

Adventure (n.) The encountering of risks; hazardous and striking enterprise; a bold undertaking, in which hazards are to be encountered, and the issue is staked upon unforeseen events; a daring feat.

Adventure (n.) A mercantile or speculative enterprise of hazard; a venture; a shipment by a merchant on his own account.

Adventurous (n.) Full of hazard; attended with risk; exposing to danger; requiring courage; rash; -- applied to acts; as, an adventurous undertaking, deed, song.

Adversaria (n. pl.) A miscellaneous collection of notes, remarks, or selections; a commonplace book; also, commentaries or notes.

Adversative (a.) Expressing contrariety, opposition, or antithesis; as, an adversative conjunction (but, however, yet, etc. ); an adversative force.

Adverse (a.) Acting against, or in a contrary direction; opposed; contrary; opposite; conflicting; as, adverse winds; an adverse party; a spirit adverse to distinctions of caste.

Adverse (a.) In hostile opposition to; unfavorable; unpropitious; contrary to one's wishes; unfortunate; calamitous; afflictive; hurtful; as, adverse fates, adverse circumstances, things adverse.

Adversely (adv.) In an adverse manner; inimically; unfortunately; contrariwise.

Adversity (n.) Opposition; contrariety.

Advertisement (n.) A public notice, especially a paid notice in some public print; anything that advertises; as, a newspaper containing many advertisements.

Advice (n.) An opinion recommended or offered, as worthy to be followed; counsel.

Advice (n.) Deliberate consideration; knowledge.

Advice (n.) Information or notice given; intelligence; as, late advices from France; -- commonly in the plural.

Advise (v. t.) To give advice to; to offer an opinion, as worthy or expedient to be followed; to counsel; to warn.

Advise (v. t.) To give information or notice to; to inform; -- with of before the thing communicated; as, we were advised of the risk.

Advise (v. t.) To consider; to deliberate.

Advise (v. t.) To take counsel; to consult; -- followed by with; as, to advise with friends.

Advisedness (n.) Deliberate consideration; prudent procedure; caution.

Advisement (n.) Consideration; deliberation; consultation.

Adviso (n.) Advice; counsel; suggestion; also, a dispatch or advice boat.

Advisory (a.) Having power to advise; containing advice; as, an advisory council; their opinion is merely advisory.

Advocate (n.) One who pleads the cause of another. Specifically: One who pleads the cause of another before a tribunal or judicial court; a counselor.

Advocate (n.) Christ, considered as an intercessor.

Advocate (n.) To plead in favor of; to defend by argument, before a tribunal or the public; to support, vindicate, or recommend publicly.

Advocation (n.) The process of removing a cause from an inferior court to the supreme court.

Adze (n.) A carpenter's or cooper's tool, formed with a thin arching blade set at right angles to the handle. It is used for chipping or slicing away the surface of wood.

Ae () A diphthong in the Latin language; used also by the Saxon writers. It answers to the Gr. ai. The Anglo-Saxon short ae was generally replaced by a, the long / by e or ee. In derivatives from Latin words with ae, it is mostly superseded by e. For most words found with this initial combination, the reader will therefore search under the letter E.

Aecidium (n.) A form of fruit in the cycle of development of the Rusts or Brands, an order of fungi, formerly considered independent plants.

Aegilops (n.) An ulcer or fistula in the inner corner of the eye.

Aegilops (n.) The great wild-oat grass or other cornfield weed.

Aeolian (a.) Of or pertaining to Aeolia or Aeolis, in Asia Minor, colonized by the Greeks, or to its inhabitants; aeolic; as, the Aeolian dialect.

Aeolipyle (n.) An apparatus consisting chiefly of a closed vessel (as a globe or cylinder) with one or more projecting bent tubes, through which steam is made to pass from the vessel, causing it to revolve.

Aerate (v. t.) To combine or charge with gas; usually with carbonic acid gas, formerly called fixed air.

Aerate (v. t.) To supply or impregnate with common air; as, to aerate soil; to aerate water.

Aeriferous (a.) Conveying or containing air; air-bearing; as, the windpipe is an aeriferous tube.

Aerification (n.) The act of combining air with another substance, or the state of being filled with air.

Aerification (n.) The act of becoming aerified, or of changing from a solid or liquid form into an aeriform state; the state of being aeriform.

Aerify (v. t.) To infuse air into; to combine air with.

Aero- () The combining form of the Greek word meaning air.

Aerobies (n. pl.) Microorganisms which live in contact with the air and need oxygen for their growth; as the microbacteria which form on the surface of putrefactive fluids.

Aerometry (n.) The science of measuring the air, including the doctrine of its pressure, elasticity, rarefaction, and condensation; pneumatics.

Aeroscope (n.) An apparatus designed for collecting spores, germs, bacteria, etc., suspended in the air.

Aeroscopy (n.) The observation of the state and variations of the atmosphere.

Aerose (a.) Of the nature of, or like, copper; brassy.

Aeruginous (a.) Of the nature or color of verdigris, or the rust of copper.

Aerugo (n.) The rust of any metal, esp. of brass or copper; verdigris.

Aery (a.) Aerial; ethereal; incorporeal; visionary.

Esthesiometer (n.) An instrument to measure the degree of sensation, by determining at how short a distance two impressions upon the skin can be distinguished, and thus to determine whether the condition of tactile sensibility is normal or altered.

Aethogen (n.) A compound of nitrogen and boro/, which, when heated before the blowpipe, gives a brilliant phosphorescent; boric nitride.

Aethrioscope (n.) An instrument consisting in part of a differential thermometer. It is used for measuring changes of temperature produced by different conditions of the sky, as when clear or clouded.

Affability (n.) The quality of being affable; readiness to converse; courteousness in receiving others and in conversation; complaisant behavior.

Affable (a.) Easy to be spoken to or addressed; receiving others kindly and conversing with them in a free and friendly manner; courteous; sociable.

Affably (adv.) In an affable manner; courteously.

Affair (n.) That which is done or is to be done; matter; concern; as, a difficult affair to manage; business of any kind, commercial, professional, or public; -- often in the plural. "At the head of affairs." Junius.

Affect (v. t.) To aim at; to aspire; to covet.

Affection (n.) An attribute; a quality or property; a condition; a bodily state; as, figure, weight, etc. , are affections of bodies.

Affection (n.) A settled good will; kind feeling; love; zealous or tender attachment; -- often in the pl. Formerly followed by to, but now more generally by for or towards; as, filial, social, or conjugal affections; to have an affection for or towards children.

Affectionate (a.) Proceeding from affection; indicating love; tender; as, the affectionate care of a parent; affectionate countenance, message, language.

Affectioned (a.) Affected; conceited.

Affeer (v. t.) To confirm; to assure.

Afferent (a.) Bearing or conducting inwards to a part or organ; -- opposed to efferent; as, afferent vessels; afferent nerves, which convey sensations from the external organs to the brain.

Affiance (n.) Plighted faith; marriage contract or promise.

Affiance (n.) Trust; reliance; faith; confidence.

Affiancer (n.) One who makes a contract of marriage between two persons.

Affiliable (a.) Capable of being affiliated to or on, or connected with in origin.

Affiliate (v. t.) To adopt; to receive into a family as a son; hence, to bring or receive into close connection; to ally.

Affiliate (v. t.) To connect in the way of descent; to trace origin to.

Affiliate (v. i.) To connect or associate one's self; -- followed by with; as, they affiliate with no party.

Affinitive (a.) Closely connected, as by affinity.

Affinity (n.) Relationship by marriage (as between a husband and his wife's blood relations, or between a wife and her husband's blood relations); -- in contradistinction to consanguinity, or relationship by blood; -- followed by with, to, or between.

Affinity (n.) Kinship generally; close agreement; relation; conformity; resemblance; connection; as, the affinity of sounds, of colors, or of languages.

Affinity (n.) That attraction which takes place, at an insensible distance, between the heterogeneous particles of bodies, and unites them to form chemical compounds; chemism; chemical or elective affinity or attraction.

Affinity (n.) A relation between species or highe/ groups dependent on resemblance in the whole plan of structure, and indicating community of origin.

Affirm (v. t.) to assert or confirm, as a judgment, decree, or order, brought before an appellate court for review.

Affirm (v. t.) To assert positively; to tell with confidence; to aver; to maintain as true; -- opposed to deny.

Affirmance (n.) Confirmation; ratification; confirmation of a voidable act.

Affirmation (n.) A solemn declaration made under the penalties of perjury, by persons who conscientiously decline taking an oath, which declaration is in law equivalent to an oath.

Affirmative (a.) Confirmative; ratifying; as, an act affirmative of common law.

Affix (v. t.) To attach, unite, or connect with; as, names affixed to ideas, or ideas affixed to things; to affix a stigma to a person; to affix ridicule or blame to any one.

Afflict (v. t.) To inflict some great injury or hurt upon, causing continued pain or mental distress; to trouble grievously; to torment.

Affliction (n.) The cause of continued pain of body or mind, as sickness, losses, etc.; an instance of grievous distress; a pain or grief.

Afflictive (a.) Giving pain; causing continued or repeated pain or grief; distressing.

Affluence (n.) A flowing to or towards; a concourse; an influx.

Affluent (a.) Abundant; copious; plenteous; hence, wealthy; abounding in goods or riches.

Affluently (adv.) Abundantly; copiously.

Afford (v. t.) To give, grant, or confer, with a remoter reference to its being the natural result; to provide; to furnish; as, a good life affords consolation in old age.

Afford (v. t.) To incur, stand, or bear without serious detriment, as an act which might under other circumstances be injurious; -- with an auxiliary, as can, could, might, etc.; to be able or rich enough.

Afforest (v. t.) To convert into a forest; as, to afforest a tract of country.

Afforestation (n.) The act of converting into forest or woodland.

Affreighter (n.) One who hires or charters a ship to convey goods.

Affreightment (n.) The act of hiring, or the contract for the use of, a vessel, or some part of it, to convey cargo.

Affriended (p. p.) Made friends; reconciled.

Affront (v. t.) To front; to face in position; to meet or encounter face to face.

Affront (v. t.) To face in defiance; to confront; as, to affront death; hence, to meet in hostile encounter.

Affront (n.) An encounter either friendly or hostile.

Affy (v. t.) To confide (one's self to, or in); to trust.

Affy (v. i.) To trust or confide.

Afloat (adv. & a.) Unfixed; moving without guide or control; adrift; as, our affairs are all afloat.

Aforethought (a.) Premeditated; prepense; previously in mind; designed; as, malice aforethought, which is required to constitute murder.

Afoul (adv. & a.) In collision; entangled.

Africander (n.) One born in Africa, the offspring of a white father and a "colored" mother. Also, and now commonly in Southern Africa, a native born of European settlers.

After (prep.) Subsequent to and in consequence of; as, after what you have said, I shall be careful.

After (prep.) Subsequent to and notwithstanding; as, after all our advice, you took that course.

After (prep.) Denoting the aim or object; concerning; in relation to; as, to look after workmen; to inquire after a friend; to thirst after righteousness.

After (prep.) In imitation of; in conformity with; after the manner of; as, to make a thing after a model; a picture after Rubens; the boy takes after his father.

After (prep.) According to; in accordance with; in conformity with the nature of; as, he acted after his kind.

After (prep.) According to the direction and influence of; in proportion to; befitting.

Afterbirth (n.) The placenta and membranes with which the fetus is connected, and which come away after delivery.

Aftercrop (n.) A second crop or harvest in the same year.

Aftergame (n.) A second game; hence, a subsequent scheme or expedient.

Aftergrowth (n.) A second growth or crop, or (metaphorically) development.

Aftermath (n.) A second moving; the grass which grows after the first crop of hay in the same season; rowen.

After-wit (n.) Wisdom or perception that comes after it can be of use.

Agha (n.) In Turkey, a commander or chief officer. It is used also as a title of respect.

Against (prep.) From an opposite direction so as to strike or come in contact with; in contact with; upon; as, hail beats against the roof.

Against (prep.) In opposition to, whether the opposition is of sentiment or of action; on the other side; counter to; in contrariety to; hence, adverse to; as, against reason; against law; to run a race against time.

Agalmatolite (n.) A soft, compact stone, of a grayish, greenish, or yellowish color, carved into images by the Chinese, and hence called figure stone, and pagodite. It is probably a variety of pinite.

Agape (n.) The love feast of the primitive Christians, being a meal partaken of in connection with the communion.

Agaric (n.) A fungus of the genus Agaricus, of many species, of which the common mushroom is an example.

Agaric (n.) An old name for several species of Polyporus, corky fungi growing on decaying wood.

Agate (n.) A semipellucid, uncrystallized variety of quartz, presenting various tints in the same specimen. Its colors are delicately arranged in stripes or bands, or blended in clouds.

Agatize (v. t.) To convert into agate; to make resemble agate.

Agaty (a.) Of the nature of agate, or containing agate.

Agave (n.) A genus of plants (order Amaryllidaceae) of which the chief species is the maguey or century plant (A. Americana), wrongly called Aloe. It is from ten to seventy years, according to climate, in attaining maturity, when it produces a gigantic flower stem, sometimes forty feet in height, and perishes. The fermented juice is the pulque of the Mexicans; distilled, it yields mescal. A strong thread and a tough paper are made from the leaves, and the wood has many uses.

Age (n.) Mature age; especially, the time of life at which one attains full personal rights and capacities; as, to come of age; he (or she) is of age.

Age (n.) The time of life at which some particular power or capacity is understood to become vested; as, the age of consent; the age of discretion.

Age (v. i.) To grow aged; to become old; to show marks of age; as, he grew fat as he aged.

Agency (n.) The office of an agent, or factor; the relation between a principal and his agent; business of one intrusted with the concerns of another.

Agglomerate (v. t.) To wind or collect into a ball; hence, to gather into a mass or anything like a mass.

Agglomerate (v. i.) To collect in a mass.

Agglomerate (n.) A collection or mass.

Agglomerate (n.) A mass of angular volcanic fragments united by heat; -- distinguished from conglomerate.

Agglomeration (n.) The act or process of collecting in a mass; a heaping together.

Agglomeration (n.) State of being collected in a mass; a mass; cluster.

Agglomerative (a.) Having a tendency to gather together, or to make collections.

Agglutinant (n.) Any viscous substance which causes bodies or parts to adhere.

Agglutinate (v. t.) To unite, or cause to adhere, as with glue or other viscous substance; to unite by causing an adhesion of substances.

Agglutinate (a.) Consisting of root words combined but not materially altered as to form or meaning; as, agglutinate forms, languages, etc. See Agglutination, 2.

Agglutinative (a.) Formed or characterized by agglutination, as a language or a compound.

Aggrandize (v. t.) To make great; to enlarge; to increase; as, to aggrandize our conceptions, authority, distress.

Aggrandize (v. t.) To make great or greater in power, rank, honor, or wealth; -- applied to persons, countries, etc.

Aggrandize (v. i.) To increase or become great.

Aggravate (v. t.) To give coloring to in description; to exaggerate; as, to aggravate circumstances.

Aggravation (n.) The act of aggravating, or making worse; -- used of evils, natural or moral; the act of increasing in severity or heinousness; something additional to a crime or wrong and enhancing its guilt or injurious consequences.

Aggregate (v. t.) To bring together; to collect into a mass or sum. "The aggregated soil."

Aggregate (a.) Formed by a collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; collective.

Aggregate (a.) Composed of several florets within a common involucre, as in the daisy; or of several carpels formed from one flower, as in the raspberry.

Aggregate (a.) Having the several component parts adherent to each other only to such a degree as to be separable by mechanical means.

Aggregate (a.) United into a common organized mass; -- said of certain compound animals.

Aggregate (n.) A mass formed by the union of homogeneous particles; -- in distinction from a compound, formed by the union of heterogeneous particles.

Aggregation (n.) The act of aggregating, or the state of being aggregated; collection into a mass or sum; a collection of particulars; an aggregate.

Aggregative (a.) Taken together; collective.

Aggress (v. i.) To commit the first act of hostility or offense; to begin a quarrel or controversy; to make an attack; -- with on.

Aggression (n.) The first attack, or act of hostility; the first act of injury, or first act leading to a war or a controversy; unprovoked attack; assault; as, a war of aggression. "Aggressions of power."

Aggrieve (v. t.) To give pain or sorrow to; to afflict; hence, to oppress or injure in one's rights; to bear heavily upon; -- now commonly used in the passive TO be aggrieved.

Agio (n.) The premium or percentage on a better sort of money when it is given in exchange for an inferior sort. The premium or discount on foreign bills of exchange is sometimes called agio.

Agist (v. t.) To take to graze or pasture, at a certain sum; -- used originally of the feeding of cattle in the king's forests, and collecting the money for the same.

Agistor (n.) Formerly, an officer of the king's forest, who had the care of cattle agisted, and collected the money for the same; -- hence called gisttaker, which in England is corrupted into guest-taker.

Agitate (v. t.) To discuss with great earnestness; to debate; as, a controversy hotly agitated.

Agitate (v. t.) To revolve in the mind, or view in all its aspects; to contrive busily; to devise; to plot; as, politicians agitate desperate designs.

Agitation (n.) The act of agitating, or the state of being agitated; the state of being moved with violence, or with irregular action; commotion; as, the sea after a storm is in agitation.

Agitation (n.) Examination or consideration of a subject in controversy, or of a plan proposed for adoption; earnest discussion; debate.

Aiglet (n.) A tag of a lace or of the points, braids, or cords formerly used in dress. They were sometimes formed into small images. Hence, "aglet baby" (Shak.), an aglet image.

Agnail (n.) A corn on the toe or foot.

Agnation (n.) Consanguinity by a line of males only, as distinguished from cognation.

Agnize (v. t.) To recognize; to acknowledge.

Agnoiology (n.) The doctrine concerning those things of which we are necessarily ignorant.

Agnomen (n.) An additional or fourth name given by the Romans, on account of some remarkable exploit or event; as, Publius Caius Scipio Africanus.

Agnosticism (n.) The doctrine that the existence of a personal Deity, an unseen world, etc., can be neither proved nor disproved, because of the necessary limits of the human mind (as sometimes charged upon Hamilton and Mansel), or because of the insufficiency of the evidence furnished by physical and physical data, to warrant a positive conclusion (as taught by the school of Herbert Spencer); -- opposed alike dogmatic skepticism and to dogmatic theism.

Agon (n.) A contest for a prize at the public games.

Agonism (n.) Contention for a prize; a contest.

Agonist (n.) One who contends for the prize in public games.

Agonistical (a.) Pertaining to violent contests, bodily or mental; pertaining to athletic or polemic feats; athletic; combative; hence, strained; unnatural.

Agonistics (n.) The science of athletic combats, or contests in public games.

Agony (n.) Violent contest or striving.

Agony (n.) Pain so extreme as to cause writhing or contortions of the body, similar to those made in the athletic contests in Greece; and hence, extreme pain of mind or body; anguish; paroxysm of grief; specifically, the sufferings of Christ in the garden of Gethsemane.

Agouara (n.) The crab-eating raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus), found in the tropical parts of America.

Agouty (n.) A rodent of the genus Dasyprocta, about the size of a rabbit, peculiar to South America and the West Indies. The most common species is the Dasyprocta agouti.

Agrarian (a.) Pertaining to fields, or lands, or their tenure; esp., relating to an equal or equitable division of lands; as, the agrarian laws of Rome, which distributed the conquered and other public lands among citizens.

Agrarianize (v. t.) To distribute according to, or to imbue with, the principles of agrarianism.

Agree (v. i.) To harmonize in opinion, statement, or action; to be in unison or concord; to be or become united or consistent; to concur; as, all parties agree in the expediency of the law.

Agree (v. i.) To make a stipulation by way of settling differences or determining a price; to exchange promises; to come to terms or to a common resolve; to promise.

Agree (v. i.) To be conformable; to resemble; to coincide; to correspond; as, the picture does not agree with the original; the two scales agree exactly.

Agree (v. i.) To suit or be adapted in its effects; to do well; as, the same food does not agree with every constitution.

Agree (v. i.) To correspond in gender, number, case, or person.

Agree (v. t.) To make harmonious; to reconcile or make friends.

Agree (v. t.) To admit, or come to one mind concerning; to settle; to arrange; as, to agree the fact; to agree differences.

Agreeable (a.) Willing; ready to agree or consent.

Agreeable (a.) Agreeing or suitable; conformable; correspondent; concordant; adapted; -- followed by to, rarely by with.

Agreeable (a.) In pursuance, conformity, or accordance; -- in this sense used adverbially for agreeably; as, agreeable to the order of the day, the House took up the report.

Agreeableness (n.) The quality of being agreeable or suitable; suitableness or conformity; consistency.

Agreeableness (n.) Resemblance; concordance; harmony; -- with to or between.

Agreeably (adv.) In accordance; suitably; consistently; conformably; -- followed by to and rarely by with. See Agreeable, 4.

Agreeingly (adv.) In an agreeing manner (to); correspondingly; agreeably.

Agreement (n.) State of agreeing; harmony of opinion, statement, action, or character; concurrence; concord; conformity; as, a good agreement subsists among the members of the council.

Agreement (n.) Concord or correspondence of one word with another in gender, number, case, or person.

Agreement (n.) A concurrence in an engagement that something shall be done or omitted; an exchange of promises; mutual understanding, arrangement, or stipulation; a contract.

Agrestic (a.) Pertaining to fields or the country, in opposition to the city; rural; rustic; unpolished; uncouth.

Agricolation (n.) Agriculture.

Agricolist (n.) A cultivator of the soil; an agriculturist.

Agricultural (a.) Of or pertaining to agriculture; connected with, or engaged in, tillage; as, the agricultural class; agricultural implements, wages, etc.

Agriology (n.) Description or comparative study of the customs of savage or uncivilized tribes.

Agronomy (n.) The management of land; rural economy; agriculture.

Agrostis (n.) A genus of grasses, including species called in common language bent grass. Some of them, as redtop (Agrostis vulgaris), are valuable pasture grasses.

Agrypnotic (n.) Anything which prevents sleep, or produces wakefulness, as strong tea or coffee.

Aguardiente (n.) A strong alcoholic drink, especially pulque.

Ague (n.) An intermittent fever, attended by alternate cold and hot fits.

Ague (n.) The cold fit or rigor of the intermittent fever; as, fever and ague.

Ague (n.) A chill, or state of shaking, as with cold.

Ague (v. t.) To strike with an ague, or with a cold fit.

Aguish (a.) Having the qualities of an ague; somewhat cold or shivering; chilly; shaky.

Ah (interj.) An exclamation, expressive of surprise, pity, complaint, entreaty, contempt, threatening, delight, triumph, etc., according to the manner of utterance.

Aich's metal () A kind of gun metal, containing copper, zinc, and iron, but no tin.

Aid (v. t.) To support, either by furnishing strength or means in cooperation to effect a purpose, or to prevent or to remove evil; to help; to assist.

Aid (v. t.) Help; succor; assistance; relief.

Aid-de-camp (n.) An officer selected by a general to carry orders, also to assist or represent him in correspondence and in directing movements.

Aigremore (n.) Charcoal prepared for making powder.

Aigrette (n.) A plume or tuft for the head composed of feathers, or of gems, etc.

Aiguillette (n.) One of the ornamental tags, cords, or loops on some military and naval uniforms.

Aim (v. i.) To direct the indention or purpose; to attempt the accomplishment of a purpose; to try to gain; to endeavor; -- followed by at, or by an infinitive; as, to aim at distinction; to aim to do well.

Aim (v. i.) To guess or conjecture.

Aim (v. i.) The pointing of a weapon, as a gun, a dart, or an arrow, in the line of direction with the object intended to be struck; the line of fire; the direction of anything, as a spear, a blow, a discourse, a remark, towards a particular point or object, with a view to strike or affect it.

Ain't () A contraction for are not and am not; also used for is not. [Colloq. or illiterate speech]. See An't.

Air (n.) The fluid which we breathe, and which surrounds the earth; the atmosphere. It is invisible, inodorous, insipid, transparent, compressible, elastic, and ponderable.

Air (n.) A particular state of the atmosphere, as respects heat, cold, moisture, etc., or as affecting the sensations; as, a smoky air, a damp air, the morning air, etc.

Air (n.) Odoriferous or contaminated air.

Air (n.) A musical idea, or motive, rhythmically developed in consecutive single tones, so as to form a symmetrical and balanced whole, which may be sung by a single voice to the stanzas of a hymn or song, or even to plain prose, or played upon an instrument; a melody; a tune; an aria.

Air (n.) To expose to the air for the purpose of cooling, refreshing, or purifying; to ventilate; as, to air a room.

Air bladder () An air sac, sometimes double or variously lobed, in the visceral cavity of many fishes. It originates in the same way as the lungs of air-breathing vertebrates, and in the adult may retain a tubular connection with the pharynx or esophagus.

Air brake () A railway brake operated by condensed air.

Air cell () A cavity in the cellular tissue of plants, containing air only.

Air chamber () A cavity containing air to act as a spring for equalizing the flow of a liquid in a pump or other hydraulic machine.

Air cock () A faucet to allow escape of air.

Air drill () A drill driven by the elastic pressure of condensed air; a pneumatic drill.

Air engine () An engine driven by heated or by compressed air.

Air gun () A kind of gun in which the elastic force of condensed air is used to discharge the ball. The air is powerfully compressed into a reservoir attached to the gun, by a condensing pump, and is controlled by a valve actuated by the trigger.

Airiness (n.) The state or quality of being airy; openness or exposure to the air; as, the airiness of a country seat.

Airless (a.) Not open to a free current of air; wanting fresh air, or communication with the open air.

Airometer (n.) A hollow cylinder to contain air. It is closed above and open below, and has its open end plunged into water.

Air pump () A kind of pump for exhausting air from a vessel or closed space; also, a pump to condense air or force it into a closed space.

Air pump () A pump used to exhaust from a condenser the condensed steam, the water used for condensing, and any commingled air.

Air sac () One of the spaces in different parts of the bodies of birds, which are filled with air and connected with the air passages of the lungs; an air cell.

Air vessel () A vessel, cell, duct, or tube containing or conducting air; as the air vessels of insects, birds, plants, etc.; the air vessel of a pump, engine, etc. For the latter, see Air chamber. The air vessels of insects are called tracheae, of plants spiral vessels.

Aisle (n.) A lateral division of a building, separated from the middle part, called the nave, by a row of columns or piers, which support the roof or an upper wall containing windows, called the clearstory wall.

Aisle (n.) Also (perhaps from confusion with alley), a passage into which the pews of a church open.

Ajar (adv.) In a state of discord; out of harmony; as, he is ajar with the world.

Al- (A prefix.) All; wholly; completely; as, almighty, almost.

Al (conj.) Although; if.

Alabaster (n.) A compact variety or sulphate of lime, or gypsum, of fine texture, and usually white and translucent, but sometimes yellow, red, or gray. It is carved into vases, mantel ornaments, etc.

Alabaster (n.) A hard, compact variety of carbonate of lime, somewhat translucent, or of banded shades of color; stalagmite. The name is used in this sense by Pliny. It is sometimes distinguished as oriental alabaster.

Alilonghi (n.) The tunny. See Albicore.

Alamodality (n.) The quality of being a la mode; conformity to the mode or fashion; fashionableness.

Alamode (adv. & a.) According to the fashion or prevailing mode.

Alarm (n.) Sudden surprise with fear or terror excited by apprehension of danger; in the military use, commonly, sudden apprehension of being attacked by surprise.

Alarm (n.) A mechanical contrivance for awaking persons from sleep, or rousing their attention; an alarum.

Albacore (n.) See Albicore.

Alban (n.) A white crystalline resinous substance extracted from gutta-percha by the action of alcohol or ether.

Albatross (n.) A web-footed bird, of the genus Diomedea, of which there are several species. They are the largest of sea birds, capable of long-continued flight, and are often seen at great distances from the land. They are found chiefly in the southern hemisphere.

Albe (conj.) Alt. of Albee

Albee (conj.) Although; albeit.

Albeit (conj.) Even though; although; notwithstanding.

Albertite (n.) A bituminous mineral resembling asphaltum, found in the county of A. /bert, New Brunswick.

Albescence (n.) The act of becoming white; whitishness.

Albescent (a.) Becoming white or whitish; moderately white.

Albicant (a.) Growing or becoming white.

Albication (n.) The process of becoming white, or developing white patches, or streaks.

Albicore (n.) A name applied to several large fishes of the Mackerel family, esp. Orcynus alalonga. One species (Orcynus thynnus), common in the Mediterranean and Atlantic, is called in New England the horse mackerel; the tunny.

Albinism (n.) The state or condition of being an albino: abinoism; leucopathy.

Albino (n.) A person, whether negro, Indian, or white, in whom by some defect of organization the substance which gives color to the skin, hair, and eyes is deficient or in a morbid state. An albino has a skin of a milky hue, with hair of the same color, and eyes with deep red pupil and pink or blue iris. The term is also used of the lower animals, as white mice, elephants, etc.; and of plants in a whitish condition from the absence of chlorophyll.

Albinoism (n.) The state or condition of being an albino; albinism.

Albite (n.) A mineral of the feldspar family, triclinic in crystallization, and in composition a silicate of alumina and soda. It is a common constituent of granite and of various igneous rocks. See Feldspar.

Albolith (n.) A kind of plastic cement, or artificial stone, consisting chiefly of magnesia and silica; -- called also albolite.

Albugo (n.) Same as Leucoma.

Albumen (n.) Nourishing matter stored up within the integuments of the seed in many plants, but not incorporated in the embryo. It is the floury part in corn, wheat, and like grains, the oily part in poppy seeds, the fleshy part in the cocoanut, etc.

Albumenize (v. t.) To cover or saturate with albumen; to coat or treat with an albuminous solution; as, to albumenize paper.

Album Graecum () Dung of dogs or hyenas, which becomes white by exposure to air. It is used in dressing leather, and was formerly used in medicine.

Albumin (n.) A thick, viscous nitrogenous substance, which is the chief and characteristic constituent of white of eggs and of the serum of blood, and is found in other animal substances, both fluid and solid, also in many plants. It is soluble in water and is coagulated by heat and by certain chemical reagents.

Albuminate (n.) A substance produced by the action of an alkali upon albumin, and resembling casein in its properties; also, a compound formed by the union of albumin with another substance.

Albuminose (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, albumen; having the properties of, or resembling, albumen or albumin.

Albuminuria (n.) A morbid condition in which albumin is present in the urine.

Albumose (n.) A compound or class of compounds formed from albumin by dilute acids or by an acid solution of pepsin. Used also in combination, as antialbumose, hemialbumose.

Alburn (n.) The bleak, a small European fish having scales of a peculiarly silvery color which are used in making artificial pearls.

Albyn (n.) Scotland; esp. the Highlands of Scotland.

Alcaic (n.) A kind of verse, so called from Alcaeus. One variety consists of five feet, a spondee or iambic, an iambic, a long syllable, and two dactyls.

Alcayde (n.) A commander of a castle or fortress among the Spaniards, Portuguese, and Moors.

Alcarraza (n.) A vessel of porous earthenware, used for cooling liquids by evaporation from the exterior surface.

Alchemy (n.) A mixed metal composed mainly of brass, formerly used for various utensils; hence, a trumpet.

Alchemy (n.) Miraculous power of transmuting something common into something precious.

Alco (n.) A small South American dog, domesticated by the aborigines.

Alcoate (n.) Alt. of Alcohate

Alcohate (n.) Shortened forms of Alcoholate.

Alcohol (n.) An impalpable powder.

Alcohol (n.) The fluid essence or pure spirit obtained by distillation.

Alcohol (n.) Pure spirit of wine; pure or highly rectified spirit (called also ethyl alcohol); the spirituous or intoxicating element of fermented or distilled liquors, or more loosely a liquid containing it in considerable quantity. It is extracted by simple distillation from various vegetable juices and infusions of a saccharine nature, which have undergone vinous fermentation.

Alcohol (n.) A class of compounds analogous to vinic alcohol in constitution. Chemically speaking, they are hydroxides of certain organic radicals; as, the radical ethyl forms common or ethyl alcohol (C2H5.OH); methyl forms methyl alcohol (CH3.OH) or wood spirit; amyl forms amyl alcohol (C5H11.OH) or fusel oil, etc.

Alcoholate (n.) A crystallizable compound of a salt with alcohol, in which the latter plays a part analogous to that of water of crystallization.

Alcoholature (n.) An alcoholic tincture prepared with fresh plants.

Alcoholic (a.) Of or pertaining to alcohol, or partaking of its qualities; derived from, or caused by, alcohol; containing alcohol; as, alcoholic mixtures; alcoholic gastritis; alcoholic odor.

Alcoholic (n.) A person given to the use of alcoholic liquors.

Alcoholic (n.) Alcoholic liquors.

Alcoholism (n.) A diseased condition of the system, brought about by the continued use of alcoholic liquors.

Alcoholization (n.) The act of reducing a substance to a fine or impalpable powder.

Alcoholization (n.) The act rectifying spirit.

Alcoholization (n.) Saturation with alcohol; putting the animal system under the influence of alcoholic liquor.

Alcoholized (imp. & p. p.) of Alcoholize

Alcoholizing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Alcoholize

Alcoholize (v. t.) To reduce to a fine powder.

Alcoholize (v. t.) To convert into alcohol; to rectify; also, to saturate with alcohol.

Alcoholometer (n.) Alt. of Alcoholmeter

Alcoholmeter (n.) An instrument for determining the strength of spirits, with a scale graduated so as to indicate the percentage of pure alcohol, either by weight or volume. It is usually a form of hydrometer with a special scale.

Alcoholometric (a.) Alt. of Alcoholmetrical

Alcoholometrical (a.) Alt. of Alcoholmetrical

Alcoholmetrical (a.) Relating to the alcoholometer or alcoholometry.

Alcoholometry (n.) The process or method of ascertaining the proportion of pure alcohol which spirituous liquors contain.

Alcohometer (a.) Alt. of Alcohometric

Alcohometric (a.) Same as Alcoholometer, Alcoholometric.

Alcoometry (n.) See Alcoholometry.

Alcoran (n.) The Mohammedan Scriptures; the Koran (now the usual form).

Alcoranic (a.) Of or pertaining to the Koran.

Alcoranist (n.) One who adheres to the letter of the Koran, rejecting all traditions.

Alcove (n.) A recessed portion of a room, or a small room opening into a larger one; especially, a recess to contain a bed; a lateral recess in a library.

Alcove (n.) A small ornamental building with seats, or an arched seat, in a pleasure ground; a garden bower.

Alcove (n.) Any natural recess analogous to an alcove or recess in an apartment.

Aldehyde (n.) A colorless, mobile, and very volatile liquid obtained from alcohol by certain processes of oxidation.

Aller (a.) Of all; -- used in composition; as, alderbest, best of all, alderwisest, wisest of all.

Aldermanic (a.) Relating to, becoming to, or like, an alderman; characteristic of an alderman.

Aldermanity (n.) Aldermen collectively; the body of aldermen.

Aldermanship (n.) The condition, position, or office of an alderman.

Alderney (n.) One of a breed of cattle raised in Alderney, one of the Channel Islands. Alderneys are of a dun or tawny color and are often called Jersey cattle. See Jersey, 3.

Ale (n.) A festival in English country places, so called from the liquor drunk.

Aleak (adv. & a.) In a leaking condition.

Aleatory (a.) Depending on some uncertain contingency; as, an aleatory contract.

Aleconner (n.) Orig., an officer appointed to look to the goodness of ale and beer; also, one of the officers chosen by the liverymen of London to inspect the measures used in public houses. But the office is a sinecure. [Also called aletaster.]

Alecost (n.) The plant costmary, which was formerly much used for flavoring ale.

Alectorides (n. pl.) A group of birds including the common fowl and the pheasants.

Alectryomancy (n.) Divination by means of a cock and grains of corn placed on the letters of the alphabet, the letters being put together in the order in which the grains were eaten.

Ale-knight (n.) A pot companion.

Alemannic (a.) Belonging to the Alemanni, a confederacy of warlike German tribes.

Alembroth (n.) The salt of wisdom of the alchemists, a double salt composed of the chlorides of ammonium and mercury. It was formerly used as a stimulant.

Alestake (n.) A stake or pole projecting from, or set up before, an alehouse, as a sign; an alepole. At the end was commonly suspended a garland, a bunch of leaves, or a "bush."

Aletaster (n.) See Aleconner.

Alethoscope (n.) An instrument for viewing pictures by means of a lens, so as to present them in their natural proportions and relations.

Alexandrine (n.) A kind of verse consisting in English of twelve syllables.

Alexipharmical (a.) Expelling or counteracting poison; antidotal.

Alexipharmic (n.) An antidote against poison or infection; a counterpoison.

Alexiteric (n.) A preservative against contagious and infectious diseases, and the effects of poison in general.

Alfione (n.) An edible marine fish of California (Rhacochilus toxotes).

Alfresco (adv. & a.) In the open-air.

Alga (n.) A kind of seaweed; pl. the class of cellular cryptogamic plants which includes the black, red, and green seaweeds, as kelp, dulse, sea lettuce, also marine and fresh water confervae, etc.

Algaroba (n.) The Honey mesquite (Prosopis juliflora), a small tree found from California to Buenos Ayres; also, its sweet, pulpy pods. A valuable gum, resembling gum arabic, is collected from the tree in Texas and Mexico.

Algaroth (n.) A term used for the Powder of Algaroth, a white powder which is a compound of trichloride and trioxide of antimony. It was formerly used in medicine as an emetic, purgative, and diaphoretic.

Algebraical (a.) Of or pertaining to algebra; containing an operation of algebra, or deduced from such operation; as, algebraic characters; algebraical writings.

Algidity (n.) Chilliness; coldness

Algidity (n.) coldness and collapse.

Algific (a.) Producing cold.

Algol (n.) A fixed star, in Medusa's head, in the constellation Perseus, remarkable for its periodic variation in brightness.

Alguazil (n.) An inferior officer of justice in Spain; a warrant officer; a constable.

Alhambresque (a.) Made or decorated after the fanciful style of the ornamentation in the Alhambra, which affords an unusually fine exhibition of Saracenic or Arabesque architecture.

Alias (adv.) Otherwise; otherwise called; -- a term used in legal proceedings to connect the different names of any one who has gone by two or more, and whose true name is for any cause doubtful; as, Smith, alias Simpson.

Alias (n.) A second or further writ which is issued after a first writ has expired without effect.

Alibi (n.) The plea or mode of defense under which a person on trial for a crime proves or attempts to prove that he was in another place when the alleged act was committed; as, to set up an alibi; to prove an alibi.

Alidade (n.) The portion of a graduated instrument, as a quadrant or astrolabe, carrying the sights or telescope, and showing the degrees cut off on the arc of the instrument

Alien (a.) Not belonging to the same country, land, or government, or to the citizens or subjects thereof; foreign; as, alien subjects, enemies, property, shores.

Alien (a.) Wholly different in nature; foreign; adverse; inconsistent (with); incongruous; -- followed by from or sometimes by to; as, principles alien from our religion.

Alien (n.) A foreigner; one owing allegiance, or belonging, to another country; a foreign-born resident of a country in which he does not possess the privileges of a citizen. Hence, a stranger. See Alienage.

Alienable (a.) Capable of being alienated, sold, or transferred to another; as, land is alienable according to the laws of the state.

Alienage (n.) The state or legal condition of being an alien.

Alienate (v. t.) To convey or transfer to another, as title, property, or right; to part voluntarily with ownership of.

Alienation (n.) A transfer of title, or a legal conveyance of property to another.

Alienism (n.) The status or legal condition of an alien; alienage.

Alight (v. i.) To come or chance (upon).

Alike (adv.) In the same manner, form, or degree; in common; equally; as, we are all alike concerned in religion.

Alimony (n.) An allowance made to a wife out of her husband's estate or income for her support, upon her divorce or legal separation from him, or during a suit for the same.

Aliped (n.) An animal whose toes are connected by a membrane, serving for a wing, as the bat.

Alisphenoidal (a.) Pertaining to or forming the wing of the sphenoid; relating to a bone in the base of the skull, which in the adult is often consolidated with the sphenoid; as, alisphenoid bone; alisphenoid canal.

Alizarin (n.) A coloring principle, C14H6O2(OH)2, found in madder, and now produced artificially from anthracene. It produces the Turkish reds.

Alkalamide (n.) One of a series of compounds that may be regarded as ammonia in which a part of the hydrogen has been replaced by basic, and another part by acid, atoms or radicals.

Alkalescency (n.) A tendency to become alkaline; or the state of a substance in which alkaline properties begin to be developed, or to predominant.

Alkali (n.) One of a class of caustic bases, such as soda, potash, ammonia, and lithia, whose distinguishing peculiarities are solubility in alcohol and water, uniting with oils and fats to form soap, neutralizing and forming salts with acids, turning to brown several vegetable yellows, and changing reddened litmus to blue.

Alkalifiable (a.) Capable of being alkalified, or converted into an alkali.

Alkalify (v. t.) To convert into an alkali; to give alkaline properties to.

Alkalify (v. i.) To become changed into an alkali.

Alkalinity (n.) The quality which constitutes an alkali; alkaline property.

Alkalization (n.) The act rendering alkaline by impregnating with an alkali; a conferring of alkaline qualities.

Alkalize (v. t.) To render alkaline; to communicate the properties of an alkali to.

Alkaloidal (a.) Pertaining to, resembling, or containing, alkali.

Alkanet (n.) A dyeing matter extracted from the roots of Alkanna tinctoria, which gives a fine deep red color.

Alkanet (n.) The similar plant Anchusa officinalis; bugloss; also, the American puccoon.

Alkargen (n.) Same as Cacodylic acid.

Alkarsin (n.) A spontaneously inflammable liquid, having a repulsive odor, and consisting of cacodyl and its oxidation products; -- called also Cadel's fuming liquid.

Alkermes (n.) A compound cordial, in the form of a confection, deriving its name from the kermes insect, its principal ingredient.

Alkoran (n.) The Mohammedan Scriptures. Same as Alcoran and Koran.

Alkoranic (a.) Same as Alcoranic.

Alkoranist (n.) Same as Alcoranist.

All (adv.) Wholly; completely; altogether; entirely; quite; very; as, all bedewed; my friend is all for amusement.

All (n.) The whole number, quantity, or amount; the entire thing; everything included or concerned; the aggregate; the whole; totality; everything or every person; as, our all is at stake.

All (conj.) Although; albeit.

Alla breve () With one breve, or four minims, to measure, and sung faster like four crotchets; in quick common time; -- indicated in the time signature by /.

Allanite (n.) A silicate containing a large amount of cerium. It is usually black in color, opaque, and is related to epidote in form and composition.

Allantoic (a.) Pertaining to, or contained in, the allantois.

Allantoin (n.) A crystalline, transparent, colorless substance found in the allantoic liquid of the fetal calf; -- formerly called allantoic acid and amniotic acid.

Allantoid (n.) A membranous appendage of the embryos of mammals, birds, and reptiles, -- in mammals serving to connect the fetus with the parent; the urinary vesicle.

Allegorical (a.) Belonging to, or consisting of, allegory; of the nature of an allegory; describing by resemblances; figurative.

Allegory (n.) A figurative sentence or discourse, in which the principal subject is described by another subject resembling it in its properties and circumstances. The real subject is thus kept out of view, and we are left to collect the intentions of the writer or speaker by the resemblance of the secondary to the primary subject.

Allegory (n.) A figure representation which has a meaning beyond notion directly conveyed by the object painted or sculptured.

Alleluiah (n.) An exclamation signifying Praise ye Jehovah. Hence: A song of praise to God. See Hallelujah, the commoner form.

Alley (n.) The space between two rows of compositors' stands in a printing office.

All hail (interj.) All health; -- a phrase of salutation or welcome.

Alliance (n.) The state of being allied; the act of allying or uniting; a union or connection of interests between families, states, parties, etc., especially between families by marriage and states by compact, treaty, or league; as, matrimonial alliances; an alliance between church and state; an alliance between France and England.

Alliance (v. t.) To connect by alliance; to ally.

Alliant (n.) An ally; a confederate.

Alligation (n.) A rule relating to the solution of questions concerning the compounding or mixing of different ingredients, or ingredients of different qualities or values.

Alligator (n.) A large carnivorous reptile of the Crocodile family, peculiar to America. It has a shorter and broader snout than the crocodile, and the large teeth of the lower jaw shut into pits in the upper jaw, which has no marginal notches. Besides the common species of the southern United States, there are allied species in South America.

Alliterate (v. i.) To compose alliteratively; also, to constitute alliteration.

Allness (n.) Totality; completeness.

Allocation (n.) An allotment or apportionment; as, an allocation of shares in a company.

Allocation (n.) The admission of an item in an account, or an allowance made upon an account; -- a term used in the English exchequer.

Allocatur (n.) "Allowed." The word allocatur expresses the allowance of a proceeding, writ, order, etc., by a court, judge, or judicial officer.

Allochroic (a.) Changeable in color.

Allochroous (a.) Changing color.

Allomerism (n.) Variability in chemical constitution without variation in crystalline form.

Allomorph (n.) A variety of pseudomorph which has undergone partial or complete change or substitution of material; -- thus limonite is frequently an allomorph after pyrite.

Allomorphism (n.) The property which constitutes an allomorph; the change involved in becoming an allomorph.

Allopathically (adv.) In a manner conformable to allopathy; by allopathic methods.

Allopathy (n.) That system of medical practice which aims to combat disease by the use of remedies which produce effects different from those produced by the special disease treated; -- a term invented by Hahnemann to designate the ordinary practice, as opposed to homeopathy.

Allot (v. t.) To distribute, or parcel out in parts or portions; or to distribute to each individual concerned; to assign as a share or lot; to set apart as one's share; to bestow on; to grant; to appoint; as, let every man be contented with that which Providence allots him.

Allotropy (n.) The property of existing in two or more conditions which are distinct in their physical or chemical relations.

Allow (v. t.) To grant, give, admit, accord, afford, or yield; to let one have; as, to allow a servant his liberty; to allow a free passage; to allow one day for rest.

Allow (v. t.) To own or acknowledge; to accept as true; to concede; to accede to an opinion; as, to allow a right; to allow a claim; to allow the truth of a proposition.

Allow (v. t.) To grant license to; to permit; to consent to; as, to allow a son to be absent.

Allow (v. i.) To admit; to concede; to make allowance or abatement.

Allowance (n.) The act of allowing, granting, conceding, or admitting; authorization; permission; sanction; tolerance.

Allowance (n.) Abatement; deduction; the taking into account of mitigating circumstances; as, to make allowance for the inexperience of youth.

Allowance (n.) A customary deduction from the gross weight of goods, different in different countries, such as tare and tret.

Alloxan (n.) An oxidation product of uric acid. It is of a pale reddish color, readily soluble in water or alcohol.

Alloxanate (n.) A combination of alloxanic acid and a base or base or positive radical.

Alloy (v. t.) Any combination or compound of metals fused together; a mixture of metals; for example, brass, which is an alloy of copper and zinc. But when mercury is one of the metals, the compound is called an amalgam.

Alloy (v. t.) The quality, or comparative purity, of gold or silver; fineness.

Alloy (v. t.) To reduce the purity of by mixing with a less valuable substance; as, to alloy gold with silver or copper, or silver with copper.

Alloy (v. t.) To mix, as metals, so as to form a compound.

Alloy (v. t.) To form a metallic compound.

Alloyage (n.) The act or art of alloying metals; also, the combination or alloy.

All Souls' Day () The second day of November; a feast day of the Roman Catholic church, on which supplications are made for the souls of the faithful dead.

Allspice (n.) The berry of the pimento (Eugenia pimenta), a tree of the West Indies; a spice of a mildly pungent taste, and agreeably aromatic; Jamaica pepper; pimento. It has been supposed to combine the flavor of cinnamon, nutmegs, and cloves; and hence the name. The name is also given to other aromatic shrubs; as, the Carolina allspice (Calycanthus floridus); wild allspice (Lindera benzoin), called also spicebush, spicewood, and feverbush.

Allude (v. t.) To compare allusively; to refer (something) as applicable.

Allusion (n.) A reference to something supposed to be known, but not explicitly mentioned; a covert indication; indirect reference; a hint.

Allusive (a.) Having reference to something not fully expressed; containing an allusion.

Alluvial (a.) Pertaining to, contained in, or composed of, alluvium; relating to the deposits made by flowing water; washed away from one place and deposited in another; as, alluvial soil, mud, accumulations, deposits.

Ally (v. t.) To unite, or form a connection between, as between families by marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league, or confederacy; -- often followed by to or with.

Ally (v. t.) To connect or form a relation between by similitude, resemblance, friendship, or love.

Ally (v.) One united to another by treaty or league; -- usually applied to sovereigns or states; a confederate.

Almagest (n.) The celebrated work of Ptolemy of Alexandria, which contains nearly all that is known of the astronomical observations and theories of the ancients. The name was extended to other similar works.

Alma Mater () A college or seminary where one is educated.

Almanac (n.) A book or table, containing a calendar of days, and months, to which astronomical data and various statistics are often added, such as the times of the rising and setting of the sun and moon, eclipses, hours of full tide, stated festivals of churches, terms of courts, etc.

Almandine (n.) The common red variety of garnet.

Almude (n.) A measure for liquids in several countries. In Portugal the Lisbon almude is about 4.4, and the Oporto almude about 6.6, gallons U. S. measure. In Turkey the "almud" is about 1.4 gallons.

Aloe (n.) A genus of succulent plants, some classed as trees, others as shrubs, but the greater number having the habit and appearance of evergreen herbaceous plants; from some of which are prepared articles for medicine and the arts. They are natives of warm countries.

Aloetic (n.) A medicine containing chiefly aloes.

Aloneness (n.) A state of being alone, or without company; solitariness.

Along (adv.) In company; together.

Alongshore (adv.) Along the shore or coast.

Alp (n.) A very high mountain. Specifically, in the plural, the highest chain of mountains in Europe, containing the lofty mountains of Switzerland, etc.

Alpaca (n.) An animal of Peru (Lama paco), having long, fine, wooly hair, supposed by some to be a domesticated variety of the llama.

Alpaca (n.) A thin kind of cloth made of the wooly hair of the alpaca, often mixed with silk or with cotton.

Al segno () A direction for the performer to return and recommence from the sign /.

Also (adv. & conj.) In like manner; likewise.

Also (adv. & conj.) In addition; besides; as well; further; too.

Also (adv. & conj.) Even as; as; so.

Altar (n.) In the Christian church, a construction of stone, wood, or other material for the celebration of the Holy Eucharist; the communion table.

Alter (v. i.) To become, in some respects, different; to vary; to change; as, the weather alters almost daily; rocks or minerals alter by exposure.

Alteration (n.) The state of being altered; a change made in the form or nature of a thing; changed condition.

Altercate (v. i.) To contend in words; to dispute with zeal, heat, or anger; to wrangle.

Altercation (n.) Warm contention in words; dispute carried on with heat or anger; controversy; wrangle; wordy contest.

Altercative (a.) Characterized by wrangling; scolding.

Alternate (a.) Designating the members in a series, which regularly intervene between the members of another series, as the odd or even numbers of the numerals; every other; every second; as, the alternate members 1, 3, 5, 7, etc. ; read every alternate line.

Alternately (adv.) By alternation; when, in a proportion, the antecedent term is compared with antecedent, and consequent.

Alternation (n.) The reciprocal succession of things in time or place; the act of following and being followed by turns; alternate succession, performance, or occurrence; as, the alternation of day and night, cold and heat, summer and winter, hope and fear.

Alternation (n.) The response of the congregation speaking alternately with the minister.

Alternative (a.) Disjunctive; as, an alternative conjunction.

Alternative (n.) The course of action or the thing offered in place of another.

Altho (conj.) Although.

Although (conj.) Grant all this; be it that; supposing that; notwithstanding; though.

Altiscope (n.) An arrangement of lenses and mirrors which enables a person to see an object in spite of intervening objects.

Alto (n.) Formerly the part sung by the highest male, or counter-tenor, voices; now the part sung by the lowest female, or contralto, voices, between in tenor and soprano. In instrumental music it now signifies the tenor.

Altogether (adv.) All together; conjointly.

Altogether (adv.) Without exception; wholly; completely.

Altrices (n. pl.) Nursers, -- a term applied to those birds whose young are hatched in a very immature and helpless condition, so as to require the care of their parents for some time; -- opposed to praecoces.

Alumina (n.) One of the earths, consisting of two parts of aluminium and three of oxygen, Al2O3.

Aluminate (n.) A compound formed from the hydrate of aluminium by the substitution of a metal for the hydrogen.

Aluminic (a.) Of or containing aluminium; as, aluminic phosphate.

Aluminous (a.) Pertaining to or containing alum, or alumina; as, aluminous minerals, aluminous solution.

Alumna (n. fem.) A female pupil; especially, a graduate of a school or college.

Alumnus (n.) A pupil; especially, a graduate of a college or other seminary of learning.

Alum shale () A variety of shale or clay slate, containing iron pyrites, the decomposition of which leads to the formation of alum, which often effloresces on the rock.

Alutaceous (a.) Of a pale brown color; leather-yellow.

Alveolate (a.) Deeply pitted, like a honeycomb.

Alveolus (n.) A cell in a honeycomb.

Alveolus (n.) A small cavity in a coral, shell, or fossil

Alvine (a.) Of, from, in, or pertaining to, the belly or the intestines; as, alvine discharges; alvine concretions.

Always (adv.) At all times; ever; perpetually; throughout all time; continually; as, God is always the same.

Amadavat (n.) The strawberry finch, a small Indian song bird (Estrelda amandava), commonly caged and kept for fighting. The female is olive brown; the male, in summer, mostly crimson; -- called also red waxbill.

Amadou (n.) A spongy, combustible substance, prepared from fungus (Boletus and Polyporus) which grows on old trees; German tinder; punk. It has been employed as a styptic by surgeons, but its common use is as tinder, for which purpose it is prepared by soaking it in a strong solution of niter.

Amalgam (n.) A mixture or compound of different things.

Amalgam (n.) A native compound of mercury and silver.

Amalgamate (v. t.) To compound or mix, as quicksilver, with another metal; to unite, combine, or alloy with mercury.

Amalgamate (v. t.) To mix, so as to make a uniform compound; to unite or combine; as, to amalgamate two races; to amalgamate one race with another.

Amalgamate (v. i.) To coalesce, as a result of growth; to combine into a uniform whole; to blend; as, two organs or parts amalgamate.

Amalgamated (a.) Coalesced; united; combined.

Amalgamation (n.) The act or operation of compounding mercury with another metal; -- applied particularly to the process of separating gold and silver from their ores by mixing them with mercury.

Amalgamation (n.) The mixing or blending of different elements, races, societies, etc.; also, the result of such combination or blending; a homogeneous union.

Amalgamator (n.) One who, or that which, amalgamates. Specifically: A machine for separating precious metals from earthy particles by bringing them in contact with a body of mercury with which they form an amalgam.

Amandine (n.) A kind of cold cream prepared from almonds, for chapped hands, etc.

Amanuensis (n.) A person whose employment is to write what another dictates, or to copy what another has written.

Amaranth (n.) A color inclining to purple.

Amaranthine (a.) Of a purplish color.

Amass (v. t.) To collect into a mass or heap; to gather a great quantity of; to accumulate; as, to amass a treasure or a fortune; to amass words or phrases.

Amassette (n.) An instrument of horn used for collecting painters' colors on the stone in the process of grinding.

Amassment (n.) An amassing; a heap collected; a large quantity or number brought together; an accumulation.

Amaze (v. t.) To confound, as by fear, wonder, extreme surprise; to overwhelm with wonder; to astound; to astonish greatly.

Amazedly (adv.) In amazement; with confusion or astonishment.

Amazedness (n.) The state of being amazed, or confounded with fear, surprise, or wonder.

Amazement (n.) The condition of being amazed; bewilderment [Obs.]; overwhelming wonder, as from surprise, sudden fear, horror, or admiration.

Amazon stone (n.) A variety of feldspar, having a verdigris-green color.

Embassador (n.) A minister of the highest rank sent to a foreign court to represent there his sovereign or country.

Amber (n.) A yellowish translucent resin resembling copal, found as a fossil in alluvial soils, with beds of lignite, or on the seashore in many places. It takes a fine polish, and is used for pipe mouthpieces, beads, etc., and as a basis for a fine varnish. By friction, it becomes strongly electric.

Amber (n.) Amber color, or anything amber-colored; a clear light yellow; as, the amber of the sky.

Amber (a.) Resembling amber, especially in color; amber-colored.

Amber fish () A fish of the southern Atlantic coast (Seriola Carolinensis.)

Ambergris (n.) A substance of the consistence of wax, found floating in the Indian Ocean and other parts of the tropics, and also as a morbid secretion in the intestines of the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), which is believed to be in all cases its true origin. In color it is white, ash-gray, yellow, or black, and often variegated like marble. The floating masses are sometimes from sixty to two hundred and twenty-five pounds in weight. It is wholly volatilized as a white vapor at 212¡ Fahrenheit, and is highly valued in perfumery.

Amber room () A room formerly in the Czar's Summer Palace in Russia, which was richly decorated with walls and fixtures made from amber. The amber was removed by occupying German troops during the Second World War and has, as of 1997, never been recovered. The room is being recreated from old photographs by Russian artisans.

Ambient (a.) Encompassing on all sides; circumfused; investing.

Ambiguous (a.) Doubtful or uncertain, particularly in respect to signification; capable of being understood in either of two or more possible senses; equivocal; as, an ambiguous course; an ambiguous expression.

Ambiparous (a.) Characterized by containing the rudiments of both flowers and leaves; -- applied to a bud.

Ambit (n.) Circuit or compass.

Ambition (v. t.) To seek after ambitiously or eagerly; to covet.

Ambitious (a.) Possessing, or controlled by, ambition; greatly or inordinately desirous of power, honor, office, superiority, or distinction.

Amblyopy (n.) Weakness of sight, without and opacity of the cornea, or of the interior of the eye; the first degree of amaurosis.

Amblypoda (n. pl.) A group of large, extinct, herbivorous mammals, common in the Tertiary formation of the United States.

Ambreate (n.) A salt formed by the combination of ambreic acid with a base or positive radical.

Ambrein (n.) A fragrant substance which is the chief constituent of ambergris.

Ambrosia (n.) The fabled food of the gods (as nectar was their drink), which conferred immortality upon those who partook of it.

Ambrosia (n.) Formerly, a kind of fragrant plant; now (Bot.), a genus of plants, including some coarse and worthless weeds, called ragweed, hogweed, etc.

Ambrosin (n.) An early coin struck by the dukes of Milan, and bearing the figure of St. Ambrose on horseback.

Ambs-ace (n.) Double aces, the lowest throw of all at dice. Hence: Bad luck; anything of no account or value.

Ambulacrum (n.) One of the radical zones of echinoderms, along which run the principal nerves, blood vessels, and water tubes. These zones usually bear rows of locomotive suckers or tentacles, which protrude from regular pores. In star fishes they occupy the grooves along the under side of the rays.

Ambulance (n.) A field hospital, so organized as to follow an army in its movements, and intended to succor the wounded as soon as possible. Often used adjectively; as, an ambulance wagon; ambulance stretcher; ambulance corps.

Ambulance (n.) An ambulance wagon or cart for conveying the wounded from the field, or to a hospital.

Ambulatory (a.) Accustomed to move from place to place; not stationary; movable; as, an ambulatory court, which exercises its jurisdiction in different places.

Ambuscade (v. t.) A lying in a wood, concealed, for the purpose of attacking an enemy by surprise. Hence: A lying in wait, and concealed in any situation, for a like purpose; a snare laid for an enemy; an ambush.

Ambuscade (v. t.) To post or conceal in ambush; to ambush.

Ambuscade (v. t.) To lie in wait for, or to attack from a covert or lurking place; to waylay.

Ambush (v. t.) A disposition or arrangement of troops for attacking an enemy unexpectedly from a concealed station. Hence: Unseen peril; a device to entrap; a snare.

Ambush (v. t.) A concealed station, where troops or enemies lie in wait to attack by surprise.

Ambush (v. t.) The troops posted in a concealed place, for attacking by surprise; liers in wait.

Amelcorn (n.) A variety of wheat from which starch is produced; -- called also French rice.

Amelioration (n.) The act of ameliorating, or the state of being ameliorated; making or becoming better; improvement; melioration.

Amenable (a.) Liable to be brought to account or punishment; answerable; responsible; accountable; as, amenable to law.

Amend (v. t.) by simply removing what is erroneous, corrupt, superfluous, faulty, and the like;

Amendatory (a.) Supplying amendment; corrective; emendatory.

Amendment (n.) An alteration or change for the better; correction of a fault or of faults; reformation of life by quitting vices.

Amends (n. sing. & pl.) Compensation for a loss or injury; recompense; reparation.

Amentaceous (a.) Resembling, or consisting of, an ament or aments; as, the chestnut has an amentaceous inflorescence.

Amerce (v. t.) To punish by a pecuniary penalty, the amount of which is not fixed by law, but left to the discretion of the court; as, the amerced the criminal in the sum on the hundred dollars.

Amercement (n.) The infliction of a penalty at the discretion of the court; also, a mulct or penalty thus imposed. It differs from a fine,in that the latter is, or was originally, a fixed and certain sum prescribed by statue for an offense; but an amercement is arbitrary. Hence, the act or practice of affeering. [See Affeer.]

American (a.) Of or pertaining to America; as, the American continent: American Indians.

Amethyst () A variety of crystallized quartz, of a purple or bluish violet color, of different shades. It is much used as a jeweler's stone.

Amethyst () A purple color in a nobleman's escutcheon, or coat of arms.

Amethystine (a.) Resembling amethyst, especially in color; bluish violet.

Amethystine (a.) Composed of, or containing, amethyst.

Ametropia (n.) Any abnormal condition of the refracting powers of the eye.

Amia (n.) A genus of fresh-water ganoid fishes, exclusively confined to North America; called bowfin in Lake Champlain, dogfish in Lake Erie, and mudfish in South Carolina, etc. See Bowfin.

Amide (n.) A compound formed by the union of amidogen with an acid element or radical. It may also be regarded as ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms have been replaced by an acid atom or radical.

Amidin (n.) Start modified by heat so as to become a transparent mass, like horn. It is soluble in cold water.

Amidogen (n.) A compound radical, NH2, not yet obtained in a separate state, which may be regarded as ammonia from the molecule of which one of its hydrogen atoms has been removed; -- called also the amido group, and in composition represented by the form amido.

Amid (prep.) In the midst or middle of; surrounded or encompassed by; among.

Amity (n.) Friendship, in a general sense, between individuals, societies, or nations; friendly relations; good understanding; as, a treaty of amity and commerce; the amity of the Whigs and Tories.

Ammeter (n.) A contraction of amperometer or amperemeter.

Ammonia (n.) A gaseous compound of hydrogen and nitrogen, NH3, with a pungent smell and taste: -- often called volatile alkali, and spirits of hartshorn.

Gum ammoniac (n.) The concrete juice (gum resin) of an umbelliferous plant, the Dorema ammoniacum. It is brought chiefly from Persia in the form of yellowish tears, which occur singly, or are aggregated into masses. It has a peculiar smell, and a nauseous, sweet taste, followed by a bitter one. It is inflammable, partially soluble in water and in spirit of wine, and is used in medicine as an expectorant and resolvent, and for the formation of certain plasters.

Ammonite (n.) A fossil cephalopod shell related to the nautilus. There are many genera and species, and all are extinct, the typical forms having existed only in the Mesozoic age, when they were exceedingly numerous. They differ from the nautili in having the margins of the septa very much lobed or plaited, and the siphuncle dorsal. Also called serpent stone, snake stone, and cornu Ammonis.

Ammonium (n.) A compound radical, NH4, having the chemical relations of a strongly basic element like the alkali metals.

Amnesty (v.) An act of the sovereign power granting oblivion, or a general pardon, for a past offense, as to subjects concerned in an insurrection.

Amnicolist (n.) One who lives near a river.

Amniota (n. pl.) That group of vertebrates which develops in its embryonic life the envelope called the amnion. It comprises the reptiles, the birds, and the mammals.

Amoeba (n.) A rhizopod. common in fresh water, capable of undergoing many changes of form at will. See Rhizopoda.

Amontillado (n.) A dry kind of cherry, of a light color.

Amorosa (n.) A wanton woman; a courtesan.

Amortization (n.) The act or right of alienating lands to a corporation, which was considered formerly as transferring them to dead hands, or in mortmain.

Amortize (v. t.) To alienate in mortmain, that is, to convey to a corporation. See Mortmain.

Amotion (n.) Removal; ousting; especially, the removal of a corporate officer from his office.

Amount (n.) To rise or reach by an accumulation of particular sums or quantities; to come (to) in the aggregate or whole; -- with to or unto.

Amount (n.) To rise, reach, or extend in effect, substance, or influence; to be equivalent; to come practically (to); as, the testimony amounts to very little.

Amour (n.) Love making; a love affair; usually, an unlawful connection in love; a love intrigue; an illicit love affair.

Ampere (n.) The unit of electric current; -- defined by the International Electrical Congress in 1893 and by U. S. Statute as, one tenth of the unit of current of the C. G. S. system of electro-magnetic units, or the practical equivalent of the unvarying current which, when passed through a standard solution of nitrate of silver in water, deposits silver at the rate of 0.001118 grams per second. Called also the international ampere.

Amphiarthrosis (n.) A form of articulation in which the bones are connected by intervening substance admitting slight motion; symphysis.

Amphiaster (n.) The achromatic figure, formed in mitotic cell-division, consisting of two asters connected by a spindle-shaped bundle of rodlike fibers diverging from each aster, and called the spindle.

Amphibious (a.) Having the ability to live both on land and in water, as frogs, crocodiles, beavers, and some plants.

Amphibious (a.) Pertaining to, adapted for, or connected with, both land and water.

Amphiblastic (a.) Segmenting unequally; -- said of telolecithal ova with complete segmentation.

Amphibole (n.) A common mineral embracing many varieties varying in color and in composition. It occurs in monoclinic crystals; also massive, generally with fibrous or columnar structure. The color varies from white to gray, green, brown, and black. It is a silicate of magnesium and calcium, with usually aluminium and iron. Some common varieties are tremolite, actinolite, asbestus, edenite, hornblende (the last name being also used as a general term for the whole species). Amphibole is a constituent of many crystalline rocks, as syenite, diorite, most varieties of trachyte, etc. See Hornblende.

Amphibology (n.) A phrase, discourse, or proposition, susceptible of two interpretations; and hence, of uncertain meaning. It differs from equivocation, which arises from the twofold sense of a single term.

Amphiboly (n.) Ambiguous discourse; amphibology.

Amphichroic (a.) Exhibiting or producing two colors, as substances which in the color test may change red litmus to blue and blue litmus to red.

Amphicoelian (a.) Alt. of Amphicoelous

Amphicoelous (a.) Having both ends concave; biconcave; -- said of vertebrae.

Amphicome (n.) A kind of figured stone, rugged and beset with eminences, anciently used in divination.

Amphictyons (n. pl.) Deputies from the confederated states of ancient Greece to a congress or council. They considered both political and religious matters.

Amphictyony (n.) A league of states of ancient Greece; esp. the celebrated confederation known as the Amphictyonic Council. Its object was to maintain the common interests of Greece.

Amphid (n.) A salt of the class formed by the combination of an acid and a base, or by the union of two oxides, two sulphides, selenides, or tellurides, as distinguished from a haloid compound.

Amphigen (n.) An element that in combination produces amphid salt; -- applied by Berzelius to oxygen, sulphur, selenium, and tellurium.

Amphipoda (n. pl.) A numerous group of fourteen -- footed Crustacea, inhabiting both fresh and salt water. The body is usually compressed laterally, and the anterior pairs or legs are directed downward and forward, but the posterior legs are usually turned upward and backward. The beach flea is an example. See Tetradecapoda and Arthrostraca.

Amphiprostyle (a.) Doubly prostyle; having columns at each end, but not at the sides.

Amphiscians (n. pl.) The inhabitants of the tropic, whose shadows in one part of the year are cast to the north, and in the other to the south, according as the sun is south or north of their zenith.

Ample (a.) Fully sufficient; abundant; liberal; copious; as, an ample fortune; ample justice.

Ample (a.) Not contracted of brief; not concise; extended; diffusive; as, an ample narrative.

Ampleness (n.) The state or quality of being ample; largeness; fullness; completeness.

Ampliation (n.) A postponement of the decision of a cause, for further consideration or re-argument.

Ampliative (a.) Enlarging a conception by adding to that which is already known or received.

Amplify (v. t.) To render larger, more extended, or more intense, and the like; -- used especially of telescopes, microscopes, etc.

Amplify (v. t.) To enlarge by addition or discussion; to treat copiously by adding particulars, illustrations, etc.; to expand; to make much of.

Amplify (v. i.) To become larger.

Amplify (v. i.) To speak largely or copiously; to be diffuse in argument or description; to dilate; to expatiate; -- often with on or upon.

Amplitude (n.) An angle upon which the value of some function depends; -- a term used more especially in connection with elliptic functions.

Ampulla (n.) The vase in which the holy oil for chrism, unction, or coronation is kept.

Amrita (n.) Immortality; also, the nectar conferring immortality.

Amulet (n.) An ornament, gem, or scroll, or a package containing a relic, etc., worn as a charm or preservative against evils or mischief, such as diseases and witchcraft, and generally inscribed with mystic forms or characters. [Also used figuratively.]

Amurcous (a.) Full off dregs; foul.

Amyelous (a.) Wanting the spinal cord.

Amygdalin (n.) A glucoside extracted from bitter almonds as a white, crystalline substance.

Amygdaloid (n.) A variety of trap or basaltic rock, containing small cavities, occupied, wholly or in part, by nodules or geodes of different minerals, esp. agates, quartz, calcite, and the zeolites. When the imbedded minerals are detached or removed by decomposition, it is porous, like lava.

Amyl (n.) A hydrocarbon radical, C5H11, of the paraffine series found in amyl alcohol or fusel oil, etc.

Amylate (n.) A compound of the radical amyl with oxygen and a positive atom or radical.

Amylene (n.) One of a group of metameric hydrocarbons, C5H10, of the ethylene series. The colorless, volatile, mobile liquid commonly called amylene is a mixture of different members of the group.

Amyloidal (a.) Resembling or containing amyl; starchlike.

Amylolytic (a.) Effecting the conversion of starch into soluble dextrin and sugar; as, an amylolytic ferment.

An () This word is properly an adjective, but is commonly called the indefinite article. It is used before nouns of the singular number only, and signifies one, or any, but somewhat less emphatically. In such expressions as "twice an hour," "once an age," a shilling an ounce (see 2d A, 2), it has a distributive force, and is equivalent to each, every.

An (conj.) If; -- a word used by old English authors.

Ana (adv.) Of each; an equal quantity; as, wine and honey, ana (or, contracted, aa), / ij., that is, of wine and honey, each, two ounces.

-ana () A suffix to names of persons or places, used to denote a collection of notable sayings, literary gossip, anecdotes, etc. Thus, Scaligerana is a book containing the sayings of Scaliger, Johnsoniana of Johnson, etc.

Anabas (n.) A genus of fishes, remarkable for their power of living long out of water, and of making their way on land for considerable distances, and for climbing trees; the climbing fishes.

Anabasis (n.) A journey or expedition up from the coast, like that of the younger Cyrus into Central Asia, described by Xenophon in his work called "The Anabasis."

Anabolic (a.) Pertaining to anabolism; an anabolic changes, or processes, more or less constructive in their nature.

Anabolism (n.) The constructive metabolism of the body, as distinguished from katabolism.

Anacanths (n. pl.) A group of teleostean fishes destitute of spiny fin-rays, as the cod.

Anachronistic (a.) Erroneous in date; containing an anachronism.

Anaclastics (n.) That part of optics which treats of the refraction of light; -- commonly called dioptrics.

Anacoenosis (n.) A figure by which a speaker appeals to his hearers or opponents for their opinion on the point in debate.

Anacoluthic (a.) Lacking grammatical sequence.

Anacoluthon (n.) A want of grammatical sequence or coherence in a sentence; an instance of a change of construction in a sentence so that the latter part does not syntactically correspond with the first part.

Anaconda (n.) A large South American snake of the Boa family (Eunectes murinus), which lives near rivers, and preys on birds and small mammals. The name is also applied to a similar large serpent (Python tigris) of Ceylon.

Anacreontic (a.) Pertaining to, after the manner of, or in the meter of, the Greek poet Anacreon; amatory and convivial.

Anacrotism (n.) A secondary notch in the pulse curve, obtained in a sphygmographic tracing.

Anadiplosis (n.) A repetition of the last word or any prominent word in a sentence or clause, at the beginning of the next, with an adjunct idea; as, "He retained his virtues amidst all his misfortunes -- misfortunes which no prudence could foresee or prevent."

Anadromous (a.) Tending upwards; -- said of terns in which the lowest secondary segments are on the upper side of the branch of the central stem.

Anaemia (a.) A morbid condition in which the blood is deficient in quality or in quantity.

Anaesthetic (a.) Characterized by, or connected with, insensibility; as, an anaesthetic effect or operation.

Anaesthetization (n.) The process of anaesthetizing; also, the condition of the nervous system induced by anaesthetics.

Anaglyptograph (n.) An instrument by which a correct engraving of any embossed object, such as a medal or cameo, can be executed.

Anaglyptography (n.) The art of copying works in relief, or of engraving as to give the subject an embossed or raised appearance; -- used in representing coins, bas-reliefs, etc.

Anagogical (a.) Mystical; having a secondary spiritual meaning; as, the rest of the Sabbath, in an anagogical sense, signifies the repose of the saints in heaven; an anagogical explication.

Anagram (n.) Literally, the letters of a word read backwards, but in its usual wider sense, the change or one word or phrase into another by the transposition of its letters. Thus Galenus becomes angelus; William Noy (attorney-general to Charles I., and a laborious man) may be turned into I moyl in law.

Anagrammatical (a.) Pertaining to, containing, or making, an anagram.

Anagraph (n.) An inventory; a record.

Analecta (n. pl.) A collection of literary fragments.

Analemma (n.) An instrument of wood or brass, on which this projection of the sphere is made, having a movable horizon or cursor; -- formerly much used in solving some common astronomical problems.

Analepsy () Recovery of strength after sickness.

Analogically (adv.) In an analogical sense; in accordance with analogy; by way of similitude.

Analogous (a.) Having analogy; corresponding to something else; bearing some resemblance or proportion; -- often followed by to.

Analogue (n.) That which is analogous to, or corresponds with, some other thing.

Analogue (n.) A word in one language corresponding with one in another; an analogous term; as, the Latin "pater" is the analogue of the English "father."

Analogue (n.) A species or genus in one country closely related to a species of the same genus, or a genus of the same group, in another: such species are often called representative species, and such genera, representative genera.

Analogy (n.) A resemblance of relations; an agreement or likeness between things in some circumstances or effects, when the things are otherwise entirely different. Thus, learning enlightens the mind, because it is to the mind what light is to the eye, enabling it to discover things before hidden.

Analogy (n.) A relation or correspondence in function, between organs or parts which are decidedly different.

Analysis (n.) A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent or original elements; an examination of the component parts of a subject, each separately, as the words which compose a sentence, the tones of a tune, or the simple propositions which enter into an argument. It is opposed to synthesis.

Analysis (n.) The separation of a compound substance, by chemical processes, into its constituents, with a view to ascertain either (a) what elements it contains, or (b) how much of each element is present. The former is called qualitative, and the latter quantitative analysis.

Analysis (n.) The resolving of problems by reducing the conditions that are in them to equations.

Analysis (n.) A syllabus, or table of the principal heads of a discourse, disposed in their natural order.

Analyst (n.) One who analyzes; formerly, one skilled in algebraical geometry; now commonly, one skilled in chemical analysis.

Analytical (a.) Of or pertaining to analysis; resolving into elements or constituent parts; as, an analytical experiment; analytic reasoning; -- opposed to synthetic.

Analyzation (n.) The act of analyzing, or separating into constituent parts; analysis.

Analyze (v. t.) To subject to analysis; to resolve (anything complex) into its elements; to separate into the constituent parts, for the purpose of an examination of each separately; to examine in such a manner as to ascertain the elements or nature of the thing examined; as, to analyze a fossil substance; to analyze a sentence or a word; to analyze an action to ascertain its morality.

Analyzer (n.) The part of a polariscope which receives the light after polarization, and exhibits its properties.

Anamnesis (n.) A recalling to mind; recollection.

Anapest (n.) A metrical foot consisting of three syllables, the first two short, or unaccented, the last long, or accented (/ / -); the reverse of the dactyl. In Latin d/-/-tas, and in English in-ter-vene#, are examples of anapests.

Anapest (n.) A verse composed of such feet.

Anapestic (a.) Pertaining to an anapest; consisting of an anapests; as, an anapestic meter, foot, verse.

Anaphroditic (a.) Produced without concourse of sexes.

Anarchical (a.) Pertaining to anarchy; without rule or government; in political confusion; tending to produce anarchy; as, anarchic despotism; anarchical opinions.

Anarchy (n.) Absence of government; the state of society where there is no law or supreme power; a state of lawlessness; political confusion.

Anarchy (n.) Hence, confusion or disorder, in general.

Anasarcous (a.) Belonging, or affected by, anasarca, or dropsy; dropsical.

Anastate (n.) One of a series of substances formed, in secreting cells, by constructive or anabolic processes, in the production of protoplasm; -- opposed to katastate.

Anastomose (v. i.) To inosculate; to intercommunicate by anastomosis, as the arteries and veins.

Anastomosis (n.) The inosculation of vessels, or intercommunication between two or more vessels or nerves, as the cross communication between arteries or veins.

Anathema (n.) A ban or curse pronounced with religious solemnity by ecclesiastical authority, and accompanied by excommunication. Hence: Denunciation of anything as accursed.

Anathematize (v. t.) To pronounce an anathema against; to curse. Hence: To condemn publicly as something accursed.

Anatomy (n.) The art of dissecting, or artificially separating the different parts of any organized body, to discover their situation, structure, and economy; dissection.

Anatomy (n.) The act of dividing anything, corporeal or intellectual, for the purpose of examining its parts; analysis; as, the anatomy of a discourse.

Ancestor (n.) One from whom an estate has descended; -- the correlative of heir.

Ancestry (n.) A series of ancestors or progenitors; lineage, or those who compose the line of natural descent.

Anchor (n.) Any instrument or contrivance serving a purpose like that of a ship's anchor, as an arrangement of timber to hold a dam fast; a contrivance to hold the end of a bridge cable, or other similar part; a contrivance used by founders to hold the core of a mold in place.

Anchor (v. t.) To fix or fasten; to fix in a stable condition; as, to anchor the cables of a suspension bridge.

Anchor (v. i.) To cast anchor; to come to anchor; as, our ship (or the captain) anchored in the stream.

Anchorage (n.) The act of anchoring, or the condition of lying at anchor.

Anchusin (n.) A resinoid coloring matter obtained from alkanet root.

Anchylose (v. t. & i.) To affect or be affected with anchylosis; to unite or consolidate so as to make a stiff joint; to grow together into one.

Ancient (a.) Known for a long time, or from early times; -- opposed to recent or new; as, the ancient continent.

Ancome (n.) A small ulcerous swelling, coming suddenly; also, a whitlow.

Ancones (pl. ) of Ancon

Ancon (n.) The olecranon, or the elbow.

Ancon (n.) Alt. of Ancone

Ancone (n.) The corner or quoin of a wall, cross-beam, or rafter.

Ancone (n.) A bracket supporting a cornice; a console.

Anconal (a.) Alt. of Anconeal

Anconeal (a.) Of or pertaining to the ancon or elbow.

Anconeus (n.) A muscle of the elbow and forearm.

Anconoid (a.) Elbowlike; anconal.

Ancony (n.) A piece of malleable iron, wrought into the shape of a bar in the middle, but unwrought at the ends.

-ancy () A suffix expressing more strongly than -ance the idea of quality or state; as, constancy, buoyancy, infancy.

And (conj.) A particle which expresses the relation of connection or addition. It is used to conjoin a word with a word, a clause with a clause, or a sentence with a sentence.

And (conj.) In order to; -- used instead of the infinitival to, especially after try, come, go.

And (conj.) It is sometimes, in old songs, a mere expletive.

And (conj.) If; though. See An, conj.

Andalusite (n.) A silicate of aluminium, occurring usually in thick rhombic prisms, nearly square, of a grayish or pale reddish tint. It was first discovered in Andalusia, Spain.

Andesite (n.) An eruptive rock allied to trachyte, consisting essentially of a triclinic feldspar, with pyroxene, hornblende, or hypersthene.

Androecium (n.) The stamens of a flower taken collectively.

Andromeda (n.) A northern constellation, supposed to represent the mythical Andromeda.

Andropetalous (a.) Produced by the conversion of the stamens into petals, as double flowers, like the garden ranunculus.

Androphore (n.) A support or column on which stamens are raised.

androus () A terminal combining form: Having a stamen or stamens; staminate; as, monandrous, with one stamen; polyandrous, with many stamens.

Anecdotage (n.) Anecdotes collectively; a collection of anecdotes.

Anecdotal (a.) Pertaining to, or abounding with, anecdotes; as, anecdotal conversation.

Anecdotical (a.) Pertaining to, consisting of, or addicted to, anecdotes.

Anecdotist (n.) One who relates or collects anecdotes.

Anelectric (a.) Not becoming electrified by friction; -- opposed to idioelectric.

Anelectrotonus (n.) The condition of decreased irritability of a nerve in the region of the positive electrode or anode on the passage of a current of electricity through it.

Anemogram (n.) A record made by an anemograph.

Anemograph (n.) An instrument for measuring and recording the direction and force of the wind.

Anemography (n.) The art of recording the direction and force of the wind, as by means of an anemograph.

Anemoscope (n.) An instrument which shows the direction of the wind; a wind vane; a weathercock; -- usually applied to a contrivance consisting of a vane above, connected in the building with a dial or index with pointers to show the changes of the wind.

Anent (a.) About; concerning; in respect; as, he said nothing anent this particular.

Aneurism (n.) A soft, pulsating, hollow tumor, containing blood, arising from the preternatural dilation or rupture of the coats of an artery.

Anfractuosity (n.) A sinuous depression or sulcus like those separating the convolutions of the brain.

Angariation (n.) Exaction of forced service; compulsion.

Angel (n.) An ancient gold coin of England, bearing the figure of the archangel Michael. It varied in value from 6s. 8d. to 10s.

Angelet (n.) A small gold coin formerly current in England; a half angel.

Angelica (n.) An aromatic umbelliferous plant (Archangelica officinalis or Angelica archangelica) the leaf stalks of which are sometimes candied and used in confectionery, and the roots and seeds as an aromatic tonic.

Angelology (n.) A discourse on angels, or a body of doctrines in regard to angels.

Angelot (n.) A French gold coin of the reign of Louis XI., bearing the image of St. Michael; also, a piece coined at Paris by the English under Henry VI.

Angienchyma (n.) Vascular tissue of plants, consisting of spiral vessels, dotted, barred, and pitted ducts, and laticiferous vessels.

Angio- () A prefix, or combining form, in numerous compounds, usually relating to seed or blood vessels, or to something contained in, or covered by, a vessel.

Angiocarpous (a.) Having fruit inclosed within a covering that does not form a part of itself; as, the filbert covered by its husk, or the acorn seated in its cupule.

Angiocarpous (a.) Having the seeds or spores covered, as in certain lichens.

Angioma (n.) A tumor composed chiefly of dilated blood vessels.

Angioscope (n.) An instrument for examining the capillary vessels of animals and plants.

Angiosporous (a.) Having spores contained in cells or thecae, as in the case of some fungi.

Angle (n.) The inclosed space near the point where two lines meet; a corner; a nook.

Angle (n.) A projecting or sharp corner; an angular fragment.

Angle (n.) A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod.

Angled (a.) Having an angle or angles; -- used in compounds; as, right-angled, many-angled, etc.

Angles (n. pl.) An ancient Low German tribe, that settled in Britain, which came to be called Engla-land (Angleland or England). The Angles probably came from the district of Angeln (now within the limits of Schleswig), and the country now Lower Hanover, etc.

Anglican (a.) English; of or pertaining to England or the English nation; especially, pertaining to, or connected with, the established church of England; as, the Anglican church, doctrine, orders, ritual, etc.

Anglicize (v. t.) To make English; to English; to anglify; render conformable to the English idiom, or to English analogies.

Anglify (v. t.) To convert into English; to anglicize.

Anglo- () A combining form meaning the same as English; or English and, or English conjoined with; as, Anglo-Turkish treaty, Anglo-German, Anglo-Irish.

Anglo-Catholic (n.) A member of the Church of England who contends for its catholic character; more specifically, a High Churchman.

Anglo-Saxon (n.) A Saxon of Britain, that is, an English Saxon, or one the Saxons who settled in England, as distinguished from a continental (or "Old") Saxon.

Anglo-Saxon (n.) The Teutonic people (Angles, Saxons, Jutes) of England, or the English people, collectively, before the Norman Conquest.

Angor (n.) Great anxiety accompanied by painful constriction at the upper part of the belly, often with palpitation and oppression.

Angular (a.) Relating to an angle or to angles; having an angle or angles; forming an angle or corner; sharp-cornered; pointed; as, an angular figure.

Angularly (adv.) In an angular manner; with of at angles or corners.

Angulated (a.) Having angles or corners; angled; as, angulate leaves.

Angulous (a.) Angular; having corners; hooked.

Angustation (n.) The act of making narrow; a straitening or contacting.

Anhima (n.) A South American aquatic bird; the horned screamer or kamichi (Palamedea cornuta). See Kamichi.

Anhydrite (n.) A mineral of a white or a slightly bluish color, usually massive. It is anhydrous sulphate of lime, and differs from gypsum in not containing water (whence the name).

Ano (n.) A black bird of tropical America, the West Indies and Florida (Crotophaga ani), allied to the cuckoos, and remarkable for communistic nesting.

Annicut (n.) A dam or mole made in the course of a stream for the purpose of regulating the flow of a system of irrigation.

Anilide (n.) One of a class of compounds which may be regarded as amides in which more or less of the hydrogen has been replaced by phenyl.

Aniline (n.) An organic base belonging to the phenylamines. It may be regarded as ammonia in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced by the radical phenyl. It is a colorless, oily liquid, originally obtained from indigo by distillation, but now largely manufactured from coal tar or nitrobenzene as a base from which many brilliant dyes are made.

Animadversion (n.) Judicial cognizance of an offense; chastisement; punishment.

Animadvert (v. i.) To take notice; to observe; -- commonly followed by that.

Animadvert (v. i.) To consider or remark by way of criticism or censure; to express censure; -- with on or upon.

Animadvert (v. i.) To take cognizance judicially; to inflict punishment.

Animalize (v. t.) To convert into animal matter by the processes of assimilation.

Anime (n.) A resin exuding from a tropical American tree (Hymenaea courbaril), and much used by varnish makers.

Animosity (v. t.) Mere spiritedness or courage.

Anion (n.) An electro-negative element, or the element which, in electro-chemical decompositions, is evolved at the anode; -- opposed to cation.

Aniseed (n.) The seed of the anise; also, a cordial prepared from it.

Anisette (n.) A French cordial or liqueur flavored with anise seeds.

Anisic (a.) Of or derived from anise; as, anisic acid; anisic alcohol.

Anisomeric (a.) Not isomeric; not made of the same components in the same proportions.

Anker (n.) A liquid measure in various countries of Europe. The Dutch anker, formerly also used in England, contained about 10 of the old wine gallons, or 8/ imperial gallons.

Ankerite (n.) A mineral closely related to dolomite, but containing iron.

Ankle (n.) The joint which connects the foot with the leg; the tarsus.

Ankled (a.) Having ankles; -- used in composition; as, well-ankled.

Anna (n.) An East Indian money of account, the sixteenth of a rupee, or about 2/ cents.

Annalize (v. t.) To record in annals.

Annals (n. pl.) A relation of events in chronological order, each event being recorded under the year in which it happened.

Annals (n. pl.) Historical records; chronicles; history.

Annals (n. pl.) The record of a single event or item.

Annals (n. pl.) A periodic publication, containing records of discoveries, transactions of societies, etc.; as "Annals of Science."

Anneal (v. t.) To subject to great heat, and then cool slowly, as glass, cast iron, steel, or other metal, for the purpose of rendering it less brittle; to temper; to toughen.

Anneal (v. t.) To heat, as glass, tiles, or earthenware, in order to fix the colors laid on them.

Annealing (n.) The process used to render glass, iron, etc., less brittle, performed by allowing them to cool very gradually from a high heat.

Annealing (n.) The burning of metallic colors into glass, earthenware, etc.

Annex (v. t.) To attach or connect, as a consequence, condition, etc.; as, to annex a penalty to a prohibition, or punishment to guilt.

Annexation (v. t.) The act of annexing; process of attaching, adding, or appending; the act of connecting; union; as, the annexation of Texas to the United States, or of chattels to the freehold.

Annexation (v. t.) The union of property with a freehold so as to become a fixture. Bouvier. (b) (Scots Law) The appropriation of lands or rents to the crown.

Annihilation (n.) The act of reducing to nothing, or nonexistence; or the act of destroying the form or combination of parts under which a thing exists, so that the name can no longer be applied to it; as, the annihilation of a corporation.

Annihilationist (n.) One who believes that eternal punishment consists in annihilation or extinction of being; a destructionist.

Anniversary (n.) The day on which Mass is said yearly for the soul of a deceased person; the commemoration of some sacred event, as the dedication of a church or the consecration of a pope.

Annotate (n.) To explain or criticize by notes; as, to annotate the works of Bacon.

Annotate (v. i.) To make notes or comments; -- with on or upon.

Annotation (n.) A note, added by way of comment, or explanation; -- usually in the plural; as, annotations on ancient authors, or on a word or a passage.

Annotator (n.) A writer of annotations; a commentator.

Annotatory (a.) Pertaining to an annotator; containing annotations.

Arnotto (n.) A red or yellowish-red dyeing material, prepared from the pulp surrounding the seeds of a tree (Bixa orellana) belonging to the tropical regions of America. It is used for coloring cheese, butter, etc.

Annoy (n.) To disturb or irritate, especially by continued or repeated acts; to tease; to ruffle in mind; to vex; as, I was annoyed by his remarks.

Annoy (n.) To molest, incommode, or harm; as, to annoy an army by impeding its march, or by a cannonade.

Annoy (n.) A feeling of discomfort or vexation caused by what one dislikes; also, whatever causes such a feeling; as, to work annoy.

Annual (a.) Of or pertaining to a year; returning every year; coming or happening once in the year; yearly.

Annual (a.) Performed or accomplished in a year; reckoned by the year; as, the annual motion of the earth.

Annual (a.) Lasting or continuing only one year or one growing season; requiring to be renewed every year; as, an annual plant; annual tickets.

Annuity (n.) A sum of money, payable yearly, to continue for a given number of years, for life, or forever; an annual allowance.

Annul (a.) To make void or of no effect; to nullify; to abolish; to do away with; -- used appropriately of laws, decrees, edicts, decisions of courts, or other established rules, permanent usages, and the like, which are made void by component authority.

Annularity (n.) Annular condition or form; as, the annularity of a nebula.

Annulated (a.) Furnished with, or composed of, rings; ringed; surrounded by rings of color.

Annulet (n.) A small, flat fillet, encircling a column, etc., used by itself, or with other moldings. It is used, several times repeated, under the Doric capital.

Annulet (n.) A narrow circle of some distinct color on a surface or round an organ.

Annulose (a.) Furnished with, or composed of, rings or ringlike segments; ringed.

Annulus (n.) A space contained between the circumferences of two circles, one within the other.

Annumerate (v. t.) To add on; to count in.

Annunciatory (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, announcement; making known.

Anoa (n.) A small wild ox of Celebes (Anoa depressicornis), allied to the buffalo, but having long nearly straight horns.

Anodyne (a.) Any medicine which allays pain, as an opiate or narcotic; anything that soothes disturbed feelings.

Anoint (v. t.) To apply oil to or to pour oil upon, etc., as a sacred rite, especially for consecration.

Anomalistical (a.) Irregular; departing from common or established rules.

Anomaly (n.) Deviation from the common rule; an irregularity; anything anomalous.

Anomaly (n.) The angular distance of a planet from its perihelion, as seen from the sun. This is the true anomaly. The eccentric anomaly is a corresponding angle at the center of the elliptic orbit of the planet. The mean anomaly is what the anomaly would be if the planet's angular motion were uniform.

Anormal (a.) Not according to rule; abnormal.

Anorthite (n.) A mineral of the feldspar family, commonly occurring in small glassy crystals, also a constituent of some igneous rocks. It is a lime feldspar. See Feldspar.

Anorthoscope (n.) An optical toy for producing amusing figures or pictures by means of two revolving disks, on one of which distorted figures are painted.

Another (pron. & a.) One more, in addition to a former number; a second or additional one, similar in likeness or in effect.

Answer (n.) To be or act in compliance with, in fulfillment or satisfaction of, as an order, obligation, demand; as, he answered my claim upon him; the servant answered the bell.

Answer (n.) To render account to or for.

Answer (n.) To be or act in accommodation, conformity, relation, or proportion to; to correspond to; to suit.

Answer (v. i.) To render account, or to be responsible; to be accountable; to make amends; as, the man must answer to his employer for the money intrusted to his care.

Answer (v. i.) To be or act by way of compliance, fulfillment, reciprocation, or satisfaction; to serve the purpose; as, gypsum answers as a manure on some soils.

Answer (v. i.) To be or act in conformity, or by way of accommodation, correspondence, relation, or proportion; to conform; to correspond; to suit; -- usually with to.

Answer (n.) Something done in return for, or in consequence of, something else; a responsive action.

Answer (n.) A counter-statement of facts in a course of pleadings; a confutation of what the other party has alleged; a responsive declaration by a witness in reply to a question. In Equity, it is the usual form of defense to the complainant's charges in his bill.

Answerable (a.) Obliged to answer; liable to be called to account; liable to pay, indemnify, or make good; accountable; amenable; responsible; as, an agent is answerable to his principal; to be answerable for a debt, or for damages.

Answerable (a.) Correspondent; conformable; hence, comparable.

Answerable (a.) Proportionate; commensurate; suitable; as, an achievement answerable to the preparation for it.

Answerableness (n.) The quality of being answerable, liable, responsible, or correspondent.

Answerably (adv.) In an answerable manner; in due proportion or correspondence; suitably.

An 't () An it, that is, and it or if it. See An, conj.

An't () A contraction for are and am not; also used for is not; -- now usually written ain't.

-ant () A suffix sometimes marking the agent for action; as, merchant, covenant, servant, pleasant, etc. Cf. -ent.

Antagonism (n.) Opposition of action; counteraction or contrariety of things or principles.

Antagonist (n.) One who contends with another, especially in combat; an adversary; an opponent.

Antagonist (a.) Antagonistic; opposing; counteracting; as, antagonist schools of philosophy.

Antagonistical (a.) Opposing in combat, combating; contending or acting against; as, antagonistic forces.

Antagonize (v. t.) To contend with; to oppose actively; to counteract.

Antalkaline (n.) Anything that neutralizes, or that counteracts an alkaline tendency in the system.

Antalkaline (a.) Of power to counteract alkalies.

Antanaclasis (n.) A figure which consists in repeating the same word in a different sense; as, Learn some craft when young, that when old you may live without craft.

Antanagoge (n.) A figure which consists in answering the charge of an adversary, by a counter charge.

Antares (n.) The principal star in Scorpio: -- called also the Scorpion's Heart.

Ant-bear (n.) An edentate animal of tropical America (the Tamanoir), living on ants. It belongs to the genus Myrmecophaga.

Ante- () A Latin preposition and prefix; akin to Gr. 'anti`, Skr. anti, Goth. and-, anda- (only in comp.), AS. and-, ond-, (only in comp.: cf. Answer, Along), G. ant-, ent- (in comp.). The Latin ante is generally used in the sense of before, in regard to position, order, or time, and the Gr. 'anti` in that of opposite, or in the place of.

Antecedency (n.) The state or condition of being antecedent; priority.

Antecedent (n.) The earlier events of one's life; previous principles, conduct, course, history.

Antecedent (n.) The first or conditional part of a hypothetical proposition; as, If the earth is fixed, the sun must move.

Antecedent (n.) The first of the two propositions which constitute an enthymeme or contracted syllogism; as, Every man is mortal; therefore the king must die.

Antecedent (n.) The first of the two terms of a ratio; the first or third of the four terms of a proportion. In the ratio a:b, a is the antecedent, and b the consequent.

Antecedently (adv.) Previously; before in time; at a time preceding; as, antecedently to conversion.

Antechapel (n.) The outer part of the west end of a collegiate or other chapel.

Antecommunion (n.) A name given to that part of the Anglican liturgy for the communion, which precedes the consecration of the elements.

Antefix (n.) An ornament at the eaves, concealing the ends of the joint tiles of the roof.

Antefix (n.) An ornament of the cymatium of a classic cornice, sometimes pierced for the escape of water.

Ant egg () One of the small white egg-shaped pupae or cocoons of the ant, often seen in or about ant-hills, and popularly supposed to be eggs.

Antenicene (a.) Of or in the Christian church or era, anterior to the first council of Nice, held a. d. 325; as, antenicene faith.

Anteportico (n.) An outer porch or vestibule.

Antepredicament (n.) A prerequisite to a clear understanding of the predicaments and categories, such as definitions of common terms.

Antero- () A combining form meaning anterior, front; as, antero-posterior, front and back; antero-lateral, front side, anterior and at the side.

Antetemple (n.) The portico, or narthex in an ancient temple or church.

Anthelion (n.) A halo opposite the sun, consisting of a colored ring or rings around the shadow of the spectator's own head, as projected on a cloud or on an opposite fog bank.

Anthemis (n.) Chamomile; a genus of composite, herbaceous plants.

Anther (n.) That part of the stamen containing the pollen, or fertilizing dust, which, when mature, is emitted for the impregnation of the ovary.

Antheridium (n.) The male reproductive apparatus in the lower, consisting of a cell or other cavity in which spermatozoids are produced; -- called also spermary.

Anthodium (n.) The inflorescence of a compound flower in which many florets are gathered into a involucrate head.

Anthokyan (n.) The blue coloring matter of certain flowers. Same as Cyanin.

Anthological (a.) Pertaining to anthology; consisting of beautiful extracts from different authors, especially the poets.

Anthologist (n.) One who compiles an anthology.

Anthology (n.) A discourse on flowers.

Anthology (n.) A collection of flowers; a garland.

Anthology (n.) A collection of flowers of literature, that is, beautiful passages from authors; a collection of poems or epigrams; -- particularly applied to a collection of ancient Greek epigrams.

Anthology (n.) A service book containing a selection of pieces for the festival services.

Anthophore (n.) The stipe when developed into an internode between calyx and corolla, as in the Pink family.

Anthophyllite (n.) A mineral of the hornblende group, of a yellowish gray or clove brown color.

Anthorism (n.) A description or definition contrary to that which is given by the adverse party.

Anthozoa (n. pl.) The class of the Coelenterata which includes the corals and sea anemones. The three principal groups or orders are Acyonaria, Actinaria, and Madreporaria.

Anthracene (n.) A solid hydrocarbon, C6H4.C2H2.C6H4, which accompanies naphthalene in the last stages of the distillation of coal tar. Its chief use is in the artificial production of alizarin.

Anthracite (n.) A hard, compact variety of mineral coal, of high luster, differing from bituminous coal in containing little or no bitumen, in consequence of which it burns with a nearly non luminous flame. The purer specimens consist almost wholly of carbon. Also called glance coal and blind coal.

Anthracoid (a.) Resembling anthrax in action; of the nature of anthrax; as, an anthracoid microbe.

Anthracomancy (n.) Divination by inspecting a burning coal.

Anthracometer (n.) An instrument for measuring the amount of carbonic acid in a mixture.

Anthracometric (a.) Of or pertaining to an anthracometer.

Anthraconite (n.) A coal-black marble, usually emitting a fetid smell when rubbed; -- called also stinkstone and swinestone.

Anthrax (n.) A microscopic, bacterial organism (Bacillus anthracis), resembling transparent rods. [See Illust. under Bacillus.]

Anthrax (n.) An infectious disease of cattle and sheep. It is ascribed to the presence of a rod-shaped bacterium (Bacillus anthracis), the spores of which constitute the contagious matter. It may be transmitted to man by inoculation. The spleen becomes greatly enlarged and filled with bacteria. Called also splenic fever.

Anthrenus (n.) A genus of small beetles, several of which, in the larval state, are very destructive to woolen goods, fur, etc. The common "museum pest" is A. varius; the carpet beetle is A. scrophulariae. The larvae are commonly confounded with moths.

Anthropography (n.) That branch of anthropology which treats of the actual distribution of the human race in its different divisions, as distinguished by physical character, language, institutions, and customs, in contradistinction to ethnography, which treats historically of the origin and filiation of races and nations.

Anthroposcopy (n.) The art of discovering or judging of a man's character, passions. and inclinations from a study of his visible features.

Anti () A prefix meaning against, opposite or opposed to, contrary, or in place of; -- used in composition in many English words. It is often shortened to ant-; as, antacid, antarctic.

Antialbumid (n.) A body formed from albumin by pancreatic and gastric digestion. It is convertible into antipeptone.

Antiattrition (n.) Anything to prevent the effects of friction, esp. a compound lubricant for machinery, etc., often consisting of plumbago, with some greasy material; antifriction grease.

Antibillous (a.) Counteractive of bilious complaints; tending to relieve biliousness.

Antichrist (n.) A denier or opponent of Christ. Specif.: A great antagonist, person or power, expected to precede Christ's second coming.

Antichristianity (n.) Opposition or contrariety to the Christian religion.

Antichthon (n.) A hypothetical earth counter to ours, or on the opposite side of the sun.

Anticipate (v. t.) To foresee (a wish, command, etc.) and do beforehand that which will be desired.

Anticipation (n.) The act of anticipating, taking up, placing, or considering something beforehand, or before the proper time in natural order.

Anticipation (n.) Hasty notion; intuitive preconception.

Anticipation (n.) The commencing of one or more tones of a chord with or during the chord preceding, forming a momentary discord.

Anticipative (a.) Anticipating, or containing anticipation.

Anticlimax (n.) A sentence in which the ideas fall, or become less important and striking, at the close; -- the opposite of climax. It produces a ridiculous effect.

Anticonstitutional (a.) Opposed to the constitution; unconstitutional.

Anticontagious (a.) Opposing or destroying contagion.

Anticonvulsive (a.) Good against convulsions.

Anticor (n.) A dangerous inflammatory swelling of a horse's breast, just opposite the heart.

Anticous (a.) Facing toward the axis of the flower, as in the introrse anthers of the water lily.

Antidotal (a.) Having the quality an antidote; fitted to counteract the effects of poison.

Antidote (n.) A remedy to counteract the effects of poison, or of anything noxious taken into the stomach; -- used with against, for, or to; as, an antidote against, for, or to, poison.

Antidote (n.) Whatever tends to prevent mischievous effects, or to counteract evil which something else might produce.

Antidote (v. t.) To counteract or prevent the effects of, by giving or taking an antidote.

Anti-federalist (n.) One of party opposed to a federative government; -- applied particularly to the party which opposed the adoption of the constitution of the United States.

Antigraph (n.) A copy or transcript.

Antilegomena (n. pl.) Certain books of the New Testament which were for a time not universally received, but which are now considered canonical. These are the Epistle to the Hebrews, the Epistles of James and Jude, the second Epistle of Peter, the second and third Epistles of John, and the Revelation. The undisputed books are called the Homologoumena.

Antilogarithm (n.) The number corresponding to a logarithm. The word has been sometimes, though rarely, used to denote the complement of a given logarithm; also the logarithmic cosine corresponding to a given logarithmic sine.

Antilogous (a.) Of the contrary name or character; -- opposed to analogous.

Antilogy (n.) A contradiction between any words or passages in an author.

Antiloquist (n.) A contradicter.

Antimacassar (n.) A cover for the back or arms of a chair or sofa, etc., to prevent them from being soiled by macassar or other oil from the hair.

Antimask (n.) A secondary mask, or grotesque interlude, between the parts of a serious mask.

Antimonate (n.) A compound of antimonic acid with a base or basic radical.

Antimonial (n.) A preparation or medicine containing antimony.

Antimonic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, antimony; -- said of those compounds of antimony in which this element has its highest equivalence; as, antimonic acid.

Antimonious (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, antimony; -- said of those compounds of antimony in which this element has an equivalence next lower than the highest; as, antimonious acid.

Antimonite (n.) A compound of antimonious acid and a base or basic radical.

Antimoniureted (a.) Combined with or containing antimony; as, antimoniureted hydrogen.

Antinational (a.) Antagonistic to one's country or nation, or to a national government.

Antinomian (n.) One who maintains that, under the gospel dispensation, the moral law is of no use or obligation, but that faith alone is necessary to salvation. The sect of Antinomians originated with John Agricola, in Germany, about the year 1535.

Antinomy (n.) A contradiction or incompatibility of thought or language; -- in the Kantian philosophy, such a contradiction as arises from the attempt to apply to the ideas of the reason, relations or attributes which are appropriate only to the facts or the concepts of experience.

Antiochian (a.) Pertaining to Antiochus, a contemporary with Cicero, and the founder of a sect of philosophers.

Antiparallel (a.) Running in a contrary direction.

Antipathetical (a.) Having a natural contrariety, or constitutional aversion, to a thing; characterized by antipathy; -- often followed by to.

Antipathic (a.) Belonging to antipathy; opposite; contrary; allopathic.

Antipathous (a.) Having a natural contrariety; adverse; antipathetic.

Antipathy (n.) Natural contrariety; incompatibility; repugnancy of qualities; as, oil and water have antipathy.

Antipeptone (n.) A product of gastric and pancreatic digestion, differing from hemipeptone in not being decomposed by the continued action of pancreatic juice.

Antiphonary (n.) A book containing a collection of antiphons; the book in which the antiphons of the breviary, with their musical notes, are contained.

Antiphony (n.) An anthem or psalm sung alternately by a choir or congregation divided into two parts. Also figuratively.

Antiphrasis (n.) The use of words in a sense opposite to their proper meaning; as when a court of justice is called a court of vengeance.

Antiphthisic (a.) Relieving or curing phthisis, or consumption.

Antipodes (n.) The country of those who live on the opposite side of the globe.

Antipodes (n.) Anything exactly opposite or contrary.

Antipyresis (n.) The condition or state of being free from fever.

Antiquary (n.) One devoted to the study of ancient times through their relics, as inscriptions, monuments, remains of ancient habitations, statues, coins, manuscripts, etc.; one who searches for and studies the relics of antiquity.

Antique (a.) In general, anything very old; but in a more limited sense, a relic or object of ancient art; collectively, the antique, the remains of ancient art, as busts, statues, paintings, and vases.

Antiquist (n.) An antiquary; a collector of antiques.

Antiquity (n.) A relic or monument of ancient times; as, a coin, a statue, etc.; an ancient institution. [In this sense, usually in the plural.]

Antirenter (n.) One opposed to the payment of rent; esp. one of those who in 1840-47 resisted the collection of rents claimed by the patroons from the settlers on certain manorial lands in the State of New York.

Antiscoletic (a.) Alt. of Antiscolic

Antiscolic (a.) Anthelmintic.

Antiscorbutic (a.) Counteracting scurvy.

Antiscorbutic (n.) A remedy for scurvy.

Antiscorbutical (a.) Antiscorbutic.

Antiscriptural (a.) Opposed to, or not in accordance with, the Holy Scriptures.

Antiseptic (n.) A substance which prevents or retards putrefaction, or destroys, or protects from, putrefactive organisms; as, salt, carbolic acid, alcohol, cinchona.

Antisocial (a.) Tending to interrupt or destroy social intercourse; averse to society, or hostile to its existence; as, antisocial principles.

Antispasmodic (n.) A medicine which prevents or allays spasms or convulsions.

Antispast (n.) A foot of four syllables, the first and fourth short, and the second and third long (#).

Antithesis (n.) An opposition or contrast of words or sentiments occurring in the same sentence; as, "The prodigal robs his heir; the miser robs himself." "He had covertly shot at Cromwell; he how openly aimed at the Queen."

Antithesis (n.) The second of two clauses forming an antithesis.

Antithesis (n.) Opposition; contrast.

Antithet (n.) An antithetic or contrasted statement.

Antithetical (a.) Pertaining to antithesis, or opposition of words and sentiments; containing, or of the nature of, antithesis; contrasted.

Antitoxine (n.) A substance (sometimes the product of a specific micro-organism and sometimes naturally present in the blood or tissues of an animal), capable of producing immunity from certain diseases, or of counteracting the poisonous effects of pathogenic bacteria.

Antitragus (n.) A prominence on the lower posterior portion of the concha of the external ear, opposite the tragus. See Ear.

Antivariolous (a.) Preventing the contagion of smallpox.

Antizymotic (a.) Preventing fermentation or decomposition.

Ant-lion (n.) A neuropterous insect, the larva of which makes in the sand a pitfall to capture ants, etc. The common American species is Myrmeleon obsoletus, the European is M. formicarius.

Antonomasia (n.) The use of some epithet or the name of some office, dignity, or the like, instead of the proper name of the person; as when his majesty is used for a king, or when, instead of Aristotle, we say, the philosopher; or, conversely, the use of a proper name instead of an appellative, as when a wise man is called a Solomon, or an eminent orator a Cicero.

Antonym (n.) A word of opposite meaning; a counterterm; -- used as a correlative of synonym.

Antozone (n.) A compound formerly supposed to be modification of oxygen, but now known to be hydrogen dioxide; -- so called because apparently antagonistic to ozone, converting it into ordinary oxygen.

Anubis (n.) An Egyptian deity, the conductor of departed spirits, represented by a human figure with the head of a dog or fox.

Anxious (a.) Full of anxiety or disquietude; greatly concerned or solicitous, esp. respecting something future or unknown; being in painful suspense; -- applied to persons; as, anxious for the issue of a battle.

Anxious (a.) Accompanied with, or causing, anxiety; worrying; -- applied to things; as, anxious labor.

Anybody (n.) A person of consideration or standing.

Anything (n.) Expressing an indefinite comparison; -- with as or like.

Aorist (n.) A tense in the Greek language, which expresses an action as completed in past time, but leaves it, in other respects, wholly indeterminate.

Apaches (n. pl.) A group of nomadic North American Indians including several tribes native of Arizona, New Mexico, etc.

Apagoge (n.) An indirect argument which proves a thing by showing the impossibility or absurdity of the contrary.

Apagogical (a.) Proving indirectly, by showing the absurdity, or impossibility of the contrary.

Apair (v. t. & i.) To impair or become impaired; to injure.

Apanthropy (n.) An aversion to the company of men; a love of solitude.

Apara (n.) See Mataco.

Apart (adv.) Separately, in regard to space or company; in a state of separation as to place; aside.

Apart (adv.) In a state of separation, of exclusion, or of distinction, as to purpose, use, or character, or as a matter of thought; separately; independently; as, consider the two propositions apart.

Apartment (n.) A compartment.

Apatite (n.) Native phosphate of lime, occurring usually in six-sided prisms, color often pale green, transparent or translucent.

Aperture (n.) The diameter of the exposed part of the object glass of a telescope or other optical instrument; as, a telescope of four-inch aperture.

Apex (n.) The tip, top, point, or angular summit of anything; as, the apex of a mountain, spire, or cone; the apex, or tip, of a leaf.

Aphakia (n.) An anomalous state of refraction caused by the absence of the crystalline lens, as after operations for cataract. The remedy is the use of powerful convex lenses.

Aphanite (n.) A very compact, dark-colored /ock, consisting of hornblende, or pyroxene, and feldspar, but neither of them in perceptible grains.

Aphelion (n.) That point of a planet's or comet's orbit which is most distant from the sun, the opposite point being the perihelion.

Aphlogistic (a.) Flameless; as, an aphlogistic lamp, in which a coil of wire is kept in a state of continued ignition by alcohol, without flame.

Aphorism (n.) A comprehensive maxim or principle expressed in a few words; a sharply defined sentence relating to abstract truth rather than to practical matters.

Aphoristical (a.) In the form of, or of the nature of, an aphorism; in the form of short, unconnected sentences; as, an aphoristic style.

Aphrodisian (a.) Pertaining to Aphrodite or Venus. "Aphrodisian dames" [that is, courtesans].

Aphrodite (n.) The Greek goddess of love, corresponding to the Venus of the Romans.

Aphrodite (n.) A large marine annelid, covered with long, lustrous, golden, hairlike setae; the sea mouse.

Aphthae (n. pl.) Roundish pearl-colored specks or flakes in the mouth, on the lips, etc., terminating in white sloughs. They are commonly characteristic of thrush.

Aphthong (n.) A letter, or a combination of letters, employed in spelling a word, but in the pronunciation having no sound.

Apician (a.) Belonging to Apicius, a notorious Roman epicure; hence applied to whatever is peculiarly refined or dainty and expensive in cookery.

Apiece (adv.) Each by itself; by the single one; to each; as the share of each; as, these melons cost a shilling apiece.

Apis (n.) A genus of insects of the order Hymenoptera, including the common honeybee (Apis mellifica) and other related species. See Honeybee.

Aplacophora (n. pl.) A division of Amphineura in which the body is naked or covered with slender spines or setae, but is without shelly plates.

Aplanatic (a.) Having two or more parts of different curvatures, so combined as to remove spherical aberration; -- said of a lens.

Aplysia (n.) A genus of marine mollusks of the order Tectibranchiata; the sea hare. Some of the species when disturbed throw out a deep purple liquor, which colors the water to some distance. See Illust. in Appendix.

Apo () A prefix from a Greek preposition. It usually signifies from, away from, off, or asunder, separate; as, in apocope (a cutting off), apostate, apostle (one sent away), apocarpous.

Apocalyptical (a.) Of or pertaining to a revelation, or, specifically, to the Revelation of St. John; containing, or of the nature of, a prophetic revelation.

Apocarpous (a.) Either entirely or partially separate, as the carpels of a compound pistil; -- opposed to syncarpous.

Apocopate (v. t.) To cut off or drop; as, to apocopate a word, or the last letter, syllable, or part of a word.

Apocopate (a.) Alt. of Apocopated

Apocopated (a.) Shortened by apocope; as, an apocopate form.

Apocopation (n.) Shortening by apocope; the state of being apocopated.

Apocope (n.) The cutting off, or omission, of the last letter, syllable, or part of a word.

Apocope (n.) A cutting off; abscission.

Apodictical (a.) Self-evident; intuitively true; evident beyond contradiction.

Apodictically (adv.) So as to be evident beyond contradiction.

Apodosis (n.) The consequent clause or conclusion in a conditional sentence, expressing the result, and thus distinguished from the protasis or clause which expresses a condition. Thus, in the sentence, "Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him," the former clause is the protasis, and the latter the apodosis.

Apograph (n.) A copy or transcript.

Apologize (v. i.) To make an apology or excuse; to make acknowledgment of some fault or offense, with expression of regret for it, by way of amends; -- with for; as, my correspondent apologized for not answering my letter.

Apologue (n.) A story or relation of fictitious events, intended to convey some moral truth; a moral fable.

Apology (n.) An acknowledgment intended as an atonement for some improper or injurious remark or act; an admission to another of a wrong or discourtesy done him, accompanied by an expression of regret.

Apomecometer (n.) An instrument for measuring the height of objects.

Apomecometry (n.) The art of measuring the distance of objects afar off.

Aponeurosis (n.) Any one of the thicker and denser of the deep fasciae which cover, invest, and the terminations and attachments of, many muscles. They often differ from tendons only in being flat and thin. See Fascia.

Apophyge (n.) The small hollow curvature given to the top or bottom of the shaft of a column where it expands to meet the edge of the fillet; -- called also the scape.

Apoplexy (n.) Sudden diminution or loss of consciousness, sensation, and voluntary motion, usually caused by pressure on the brain.

Aporia (n.) A figure in which the speaker professes to be at a loss what course to pursue, where to begin to end, what to say, etc.

Aporosa (n. pl.) A group of corals in which the coral is not porous; -- opposed to Perforata.

Aposiopesis (n.) A figure of speech in which the speaker breaks off suddenly, as if unwilling or unable to state what was in his mind; as, "I declare to you that his conduct -- but I can not speak of that, here."

Apostle (n.) Literally: One sent forth; a messenger. Specifically: One of the twelve disciples of Christ, specially chosen as his companions and witnesses, and sent forth to preach the gospel.

Apostle (n.) A brief letter dimissory sent by a court appealed from to the superior court, stating the case, etc.; a paper sent up on appeals in the admiralty courts.

Apostolical (a.) According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice.

Apostrophe (n.) A figure of speech by which the orator or writer suddenly breaks off from the previous method of his discourse, and addresses, in the second person, some person or thing, absent or present; as, Milton's apostrophe to Light at the beginning of the third book of "Paradise Lost."

Apostrophe (n.) The contraction of a word by the omission of a letter or letters, which omission is marked by the character ['] placed where the letter or letters would have been; as, call'd for called.

Apostrophe (n.) The mark ['] used to denote that a word is contracted (as in ne'er for never, can't for can not), and as a sign of the possessive, singular and plural; as, a boy's hat, boys' hats. In the latter use it originally marked the omission of the letter e.

Apostrophize (p. pr. & vb. n.) To contract by omitting a letter or letters; also, to mark with an apostrophe (') or apostrophes.

Apotelesmatic (a.) Relating to the casting of horoscopes.

Apothecary (n.) One who prepares and sells drugs or compounds for medicinal purposes.

Apophthegm (n.) A short, pithy, and instructive saying; a terse remark, conveying some important truth; a sententious precept or maxim.

Apothegmatist (n.) A collector or maker of apothegms.

Apothesis (n.) A dressing room connected with a public bath.

Apotome (n.) The difference between two quantities commensurable only in power, as between Ă2 and 1, or between the diagonal and side of a square.

Apozem (n.) A decoction or infusion.

Apozemical (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a decoction.

Appalachian (a.) Of or pertaining to a chain of mountains in the United States, commonly called the Allegheny mountains.

Appall (a.) To depress or discourage with fear; to impress with fear in such a manner that the mind shrinks, or loses its firmness; to overcome with sudden terror or horror; to dismay; as, the sight appalled the stoutest heart.

Appall (v. i.) To grow faint; to become weak; to become dismayed or discouraged.

Appall (v. i.) To lose flavor or become stale.

Appanage (n.) That which belongs to one by custom or right; a natural adjunct or accompaniment.

Apparatus (n.) Hence: A full collection or set of implements, or utensils, for a given duty, experimental or operative; any complex instrument or appliance, mechanical or chemical, for a specific action or operation; machinery; mechanism.

Apparatus (n.) A collection of organs all of which unite in a common function; as, the respiratory apparatus.

Apparel (v. t.) To dress with external ornaments; to cover with something ornamental; to deck; to embellish; as, trees appareled with flowers, or a garden with verdure.

Apparition (n.) The act of becoming visible; appearance; visibility.

Apparitor (n.) A messenger or officer who serves the process of an ecclesiastical court.

Appeal (v. t.) To make application for the removal of (a cause) from an inferior to a superior judge or court for a rehearing or review on account of alleged injustice or illegality in the trial below. We say, the cause was appealed from an inferior court.

Appeal (v. t.) To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of reexamination of for decision.

Appeal (v. t.) To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request.

Appeal (v. t.) An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for reexamination or review.

Appeal (v. t.) An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver. See Approvement.

Appeal (v. t.) Resort to physical means; recourse.

Appear (v. i.) To come or be in sight; to be in view; to become visible.

Appear (v. i.) To come before the public; as, a great writer appeared at that time.

Appear (v. i.) To stand in presence of some authority, tribunal, or superior person, to answer a charge, plead a cause, or the like; to present one's self as a party or advocate before a court, or as a person to be tried.

Appear (v. i.) To become visible to the apprehension of the mind; to be known as a subject of observation or comprehension, or as a thing proved; to be obvious or manifest.

Appearance (n.) The act of appearing or coming into sight; the act of becoming visible to the eye; as, his sudden appearance surprised me.

Appearance (n.) The act of appearing in a particular place, or in society, a company, or any proceedings; a coming before the public in a particular character; as, a person makes his appearance as an historian, an artist, or an orator.

Appearance (n.) The coming into court of either of the parties; the being present in court; the coming into court of a party summoned in an action, either by himself or by his attorney, expressed by a formal entry by the proper officer to that effect; the act or proceeding by which a party proceeded against places himself before the court, and submits to its jurisdiction.

Appellant (n.) One who appealed to a general council against the bull Unigenitus.

Appellate (a.) Pertaining to, or taking cognizance of, appeals.

Appellative (a.) Pertaining to a common name; serving as a distinctive denomination; denominative; naming.

Appellative (n.) A common name, in distinction from a proper name. A common name, or appellative, stands for a whole class, genus, or species of beings, or for universal ideas. Thus, tree is the name of all plants of a particular class; plant and vegetable are names of things that grow out of the earth. A proper name, on the other hand, stands for a single thing; as, Rome, Washington, Lake Erie.

Appellatively (adv.) After the manner of nouns appellative; in a manner to express whole classes or species; as, Hercules is sometimes used appellatively, that is, as a common name, to signify a strong man.

Appellor (n.) One who confesses a felony committed and accuses his accomplices.

Append (v. t.) To hang or attach to, as by a string, so that the thing is suspended; as, a seal appended to a record; the inscription was appended to the column.

Appendage (n.) Something appended to, or accompanying, a principal or greater thing, though not necessary to it, as a portico to a house.

Appendant (v. t.) Hanging; annexed; adjunct; concomitant; as, a seal appendant to a paper.

Appendant (v. t.) Appended by prescription, that is, a personal usage for a considerable time; -- said of a thing of inheritance belonging to another inheritance which is superior or more worthy; as, an advowson, common, etc. , which may be appendant to a manor, common of fishing to a freehold, a seat in church to a house.

Appendix (n.) Something appended or added; an appendage, adjunct, or concomitant.

Appendix (n.) Any literary matter added to a book, but not necessarily essential to its completeness, and thus distinguished from supplement, which is intended to supply deficiencies and correct inaccuracies.

Apperceive (v. t.) To perceive; to comprehend.

Applaud (v. t.) To praise by words; to express approbation of; to commend; to approve.

Applause (n.) The act of applauding; approbation and praise publicly expressed by clapping the hands, stamping or tapping with the feet, acclamation, huzzas, or other means; marked commendation.

Apple-john (n.) A kind of apple which by keeping becomes much withered; -- called also Johnapple.

Appliable (a.) Applicable; also, compliant.

Applicable (a.) Capable of being applied; fit or suitable to be applied; having relevance; as, this observation is applicable to the case under consideration.

Application (n.) The act of applying as a means; the employment of means to accomplish an end; specific use.

Application (n.) The act of directing or referring something to a particular case, to discover or illustrate agreement or disagreement, fitness, or correspondence; as, I make the remark, and leave you to make the application; the application of a theory.

Application (n.) Hence, in specific uses: (a) That part of a sermon or discourse in which the principles before laid down and illustrated are applied to practical uses; the "moral" of a fable. (b) The use of the principles of one science for the purpose of enlarging or perfecting another; as, the application of algebra to geometry.

Application (n.) The act of making request of soliciting; as, an application for an office; he made application to a court of chancery.

Application (n.) A request; a document containing a request; as, his application was placed on file.

Applique (a.) Ornamented with a pattern (which has been cut out of another color or stuff) applied or transferred to a foundation; as, applique lace; applique work.

Apply (v. i.) To suit; to agree; to have some connection, agreement, or analogy; as, this argument applies well to the case.

Apply (v. i.) To make request; to have recourse with a view to gain something; to make application. (to); to solicit; as, to apply to a friend for information.

Appoint (v. t.) To fix by a decree, order, command, resolve, decision, or mutual agreement; to constitute; to ordain; to prescribe; to fix the time and place of.

Appoint (v. t.) To point at by way, or for the purpose, of censure or commendation; to arraign.

Appoint (v. t.) To direct, designate, or limit; to make or direct a new disposition of, by virtue of a power contained in a conveyance; -- said of an estate already conveyed.

Appointable (a.) Capable of being appointed or constituted.

Appointment (n.) Decree; direction; established order or constitution; as, to submit to the divine appointments.

Appointment (n.) Equipment, furniture, as for a ship or an army; whatever is appointed for use and management; outfit; (pl.) the accouterments of military officers or soldiers, as belts, sashes, swords.

Appointment (n.) A honorary part or exercise, as an oration, etc., at a public exhibition of a college; as, to have an appointment.

Apposer (n.) An examiner; one whose business is to put questions. Formerly, in the English Court of Exchequer, an officer who audited the sheriffs' accounts.

Apposition (n.) The putting of things in juxtaposition, or side by side; also, the condition of being so placed.

Apposition (n.) The state of two nouns or pronouns, put in the same case, without a connecting word between them; as, I admire Cicero, the orator. Here, the second noun explains or characterizes the first.

Appraise (v. t.) To estimate; to conjecture.

Appraise (v. t.) To praise; to commend.

Appreciation (n.) A just valuation or estimate of merit, worth, weight, etc.; recognition of excellence.

Appreciation (n.) Accurate perception; true estimation; as, an appreciation of the difficulties before us; an appreciation of colors.

Appreciativeness (n.) The quality of being appreciative; quick recognition of excellence.

Appreciatory (a.) Showing appreciation; appreciative; as, appreciatory commendation.

Apprehend (v. t.) To take hold of with the understanding, that is, to conceive in the mind; to become cognizant of; to understand; to recognize; to consider.

Apprehensible (a.) Capable of being apprehended or conceived.

Apprehension (n.) The act of grasping with the intellect; the contemplation of things, without affirming, denying, or passing any judgment; intellection; perception.

Apprehension (n.) Opinion; conception; sentiment; idea.

Apprehension (n.) The faculty by which ideas are conceived; understanding; as, a man of dull apprehension.

Apprehensive (a.) Knowing; conscious; cognizant.

Apprehensive (a.) Anticipative of something unfavorable' fearful of what may be coming; in dread of possible harm; in expectation of evil.

Apprentice (n.) A barrister, considered a learner of law till of sixteen years' standing, when he might be called to the rank of serjeant.

Apprenticeship (n.) The service or condition of an apprentice; the state in which a person is gaining instruction in a trade or art, under legal agreement.

Apprise (v. t.) To give notice, verbal or written; to inform; -- followed by of; as, we will apprise the general of an intended attack; he apprised the commander of what he had done.

Approach (v. i.) To come or go near, in place or time; to draw nigh; to advance nearer.

Approach (v. t.) To come near to in place, time, or character; to draw nearer to; as, to approach the city; to approach my cabin; he approached the age of manhood.

Approach (v. i.) The act of drawing near; a coming or advancing near.

Approach (v. i.) The advanced works, trenches, or covered roads made by besiegers in their advances toward a fortress or military post.

Approbation (n.) The act of approving; an assenting to the propriety of a thing with some degree of pleasure or satisfaction; approval; sanction; commendation.

Approbatory (a.) Containing or expressing approbation; commendatory.

Approof (n.) Approval; commendation.

Appropriate (v. t.) To take to one's self in exclusion of others; to claim or use as by an exclusive right; as, let no man appropriate the use of a common benefit.

Appropriate (v. t.) To annex, as a benefice, to a spiritual corporation, as its property.

Appropriation (n.) The severing or sequestering of a benefice to the perpetual use of a spiritual corporation. Blackstone.

Appropriator (n.) A spiritual corporation possessed of an appropriated benefice; also, an impropriator.

Approve (v. t.) To sanction officially; to ratify; to confirm; as, to approve the decision of a court-martial.

Approve (v. t.) To regard as good; to commend; to be pleased with; to think well of; as, we approve the measured of the administration.

Approve (v. t.) To make profit of; to convert to one's own profit; -- said esp. of waste or common land appropriated by the lord of the manor.

Approvement (n.) a confession of guilt by a prisoner charged with treason or felony, together with an accusation of his accomplish and a giving evidence against them in order to obtain his own pardon. The term is no longer in use; it corresponded to what is now known as turning king's (or queen's) evidence in England, and state's evidence in the United States.

Approvement (n.) Improvement of common lands, by inclosing and converting them to the uses of husbandry for the advantage of the lord of the manor.

Approver (n.) One who confesses a crime and accuses another. See 1st Approvement, 2.

Approving (a.) Expressing approbation; commending; as, an approving smile.

Approximate (a.) Near correctness; nearly exact; not perfectly accurate; as, approximate results or values.

Approximate (v. t.) To come near to; to approach.

Approximation (n.) An approach to a correct estimate, calculation, or conception, or to a given quantity, quality, etc.

Approximation (n.) A continual approach or coming nearer to a result; as, to solve an equation by approximation.

Approximation (n.) A value that is nearly but not exactly correct.

Appulse (n.) The near approach of one heavenly body to another, or to the meridian; a coming into conjunction; as, the appulse of the moon to a star, or of a star to the meridian.

Appurtenance (n.) That which belongs to something else; an adjunct; an appendage; an accessory; something annexed to another thing more worthy; in common parlance and legal acceptation, something belonging to another thing as principal, and which passes as incident to it, as a right of way, or other easement to land; a right of common to pasture, an outhouse, barn, garden, or orchard, to a house or messuage. In a strict legal sense, land can never pass as an appurtenance to land.

Apricot (n.) A fruit allied to the plum, of an orange color, oval shape, and delicious taste; also, the tree (Prunus Armeniaca of Linnaeus) which bears this fruit. By cultivation it has been introduced throughout the temperate zone.

A priori () Characterizing that kind of reasoning which deduces consequences from definitions formed, or principles assumed, or which infers effects from causes previously known; deductive or deductively. The reverse of a posteriori.

A priori () Applied to knowledge and conceptions assumed, or presupposed, as prior to experience, in order to make experience rational or possible.

Apron (n.) An article of dress, of cloth, leather, or other stuff, worn on the fore part of the body, to keep the clothes clean, to defend them from injury, or as a covering. It is commonly tied at the waist by strings.

Apron (n.) The fat skin covering the belly of a goose or duck.

Apron (n.) A leaden plate that covers the vent of a cannon.

Apsis (n.) One of the two points of an orbit, as of a planet or satellite, which are at the greatest and least distance from the central body, corresponding to the aphelion and perihelion of a planet, or to the apogee and perigee of the moon. The more distant is called the higher apsis; the other, the lower apsis; and the line joining them, the line of apsides.

Apsis (n.) In a curve referred to polar coordinates, any point for which the radius vector is a maximum or minimum.

Aptera (n. pl.) Insects without wings, constituting the seventh Linnaen order of insects, an artificial group, which included Crustacea, spiders, centipeds, and even worms. These animals are now placed in several distinct classes and orders.

Apteral (a.) Without lateral columns; -- applied to buildings which have no series of columns along their sides, but are either prostyle or amphiprostyle, and opposed to peripteral.

Apteryx (n.) A genus of New Zealand birds about the size of a hen, with only short rudiments of wings, armed with a claw and without a tail; the kiwi. It is allied to the gigantic extinct moas of the same country. Five species are known.

Aptychus (n.) A shelly plate found in the terminal chambers of ammonite shells. Some authors consider them to be jaws; others, opercula.

Apyrous (a.) Incombustible; capable of sustaining a strong heat without alteration of form or properties.

Aquarelle (n.) A design or painting in thin transparent water colors; also, the mode of painting in such colors.

Aquarellist (n.) A painter in thin transparent water colors.

Aquarius (n.) A constellation south of Pegasus.

Aquatinta (n.) A kind of etching in which spaces are bitten by the use of aqua fortis, by which an effect is produced resembling a drawing in water colors or India ink; also, the engraving produced by this method.

Aqueduct (n.) A conductor, conduit, or artificial channel for conveying water, especially one for supplying large cities with water.

Aqueduct (n.) A canal or passage; as, the aqueduct of Sylvius, a channel connecting the third and fourth ventricles of the brain.

Aquiferous (a.) Consisting or conveying water or a watery fluid; as, aquiferous vessels; the aquiferous system.

Aquila (n.) A northern constellation southerly from Lyra and Cygnus and preceding the Dolphin; the Eagle.

Aquitanian (a.) Of or pertaining to Aquitania, now called Gascony.

Aquosity (n.) The condition of being wet or watery; wateriness.

Ar (conj.) Ere; before.

Ara (n.) The Altar; a southern constellation, south of the tail of the Scorpion.

Arabesque (n.) A style of ornamentation either painted, inlaid, or carved in low relief. It consists of a pattern in which plants, fruits, foliage, etc., as well as figures of men and animals, real or imaginary, are fantastically interlaced or put together.

Arabesque (a.) Relating to, or exhibiting, the style of ornament called arabesque; as, arabesque frescoes.

Arabin (n.) A carbohydrate, isomeric with cane sugar, contained in gum arabic, from which it is extracted as a white, amorphous substance.

Arabinose (n.) A sugar of the composition C5H10O5, obtained from cherry gum by boiling it with dilute sulphuric acid.

Araby (n.) The country of Arabia.

Arachnoid (a.) Resembling a spider's web; cobweblike.

Arachnoid (a.) Pertaining to a thin membrane of the brain and spinal cord, between the dura mater and pia mater.

Arachnoid (a.) Covered with, or composed of, soft, loose hairs or fibers, so as to resemble a cobweb; cobwebby.

Araeostyle (a. & n.) See Intercolumniation.

Araeosystyle (a. & n.) See Intercolumniation.

Aragonite (n.) A mineral identical in composition with calcite or carbonate of lime, but differing from it in its crystalline form and some of its physical characters.

Araneous (a.) Cobweblike; extremely thin and delicate, like a cobweb; as, the araneous membrane of the eye. See Arachnoid.

Arara (n.) The palm (or great black) cockatoo, of Australia (Microglossus aterrimus).

Araucaria (n.) A genus of tall conifers of the pine family. The species are confined mostly to South America and Australia. The wood cells differ from those of other in having the dots in their lateral surfaces in two or three rows, and the dots of contiguous rows alternating. The seeds are edible.

Araucarian (a.) Relating to, or of the nature of, the Araucaria. The earliest conifers in geological history were mostly Araucarian.

Arbalist (n.) A crossbow, consisting of a steel bow set in a shaft of wood, furnished with a string and a trigger, and a mechanical device for bending the bow. It served to throw arrows, darts, bullets, etc.

Arbiter (n.) A person appointed, or chosen, by parties to determine a controversy between them.

Arbiter (n.) Any person who has the power of judging and determining, or ordaining, without control; one whose power of deciding and governing is not limited.

Arbitrary (a.) Exercised according to one's own will or caprice, and therefore conveying a notion of a tendency to abuse the possession of power.

Arbitration (n.) The hearing and determination of a cause between parties in controversy, by a person or persons chosen by the parties.

Arbitrator (n.) A person, or one of two or more persons, chosen by parties who have a controversy, to determine their differences. See Arbitration.

Arbitrator (n.) One who has the power of deciding or prescribing without control; a ruler; a governor.

Arbor (n.) A kind of latticework formed of, or covered with, vines, branches of trees, or other plants, for shade; a bower.

Arboreous (a.) Having the form, constitution, or habits, of a proper tree, in distinction from a shrub.

Arborescent (a.) Resembling a tree; becoming woody in stalk; dendritic; having crystallizations disposed like the branches and twigs of a tree.

Arboretum (n.) A place in which a collection of rare trees and shrubs is cultivated for scientific or educational purposes.

Arboricole (a.) Tree-inhabiting; -- said of certain birds.

Arbustive (a.) Containing copses of trees or shrubs; covered with shrubs.

Arc (n.) A curvature in the shape of a circular arc or an arch; as, the colored arc (the rainbow); the arc of Hadley's quadrant.

Arcade (n.) A series of arches with the columns or piers which support them, the spandrels above, and other necessary appurtenances; sometimes open, serving as an entrance or to give light; sometimes closed at the back (as in the cut) and forming a decorative feature.

Arcade (n.) An arched or covered passageway or avenue.

Arcadia (n.) A mountainous and picturesque district of Greece, in the heart of the Peloponnesus, whose people were distinguished for contentment and rural happiness.

Arch (n.) A flat arch is a member constructed of stones cut into wedges or other shapes so as to support each other without rising in a curve.

Arch (n.) Any place covered by an arch; an archway; as, to pass into the arch of a bridge.

Arch (v. t.) To cover with an arch or arches.

Archaism (a.) An ancient, antiquated, or old-fashioned, word, expression, or idiom; a word or form of speech no longer in common use.

Archbishop (n.) A chief bishop; a church dignitary of the first class (often called a metropolitan or primate) who superintends the conduct of the suffragan bishops in his province, and also exercises episcopal authority in his own diocese.

Archbishopric (n.) The jurisdiction or office of an archbishop; the see or province over which archbishop exercises archiepiscopal authority.

Archchancellor (n.) A chief chancellor; -- an officer in the old German empire, who presided over the secretaries of the court.

Archdeacon (n.) In England, an ecclesiastical dignitary, next in rank below a bishop, whom he assists, and by whom he is appointed, though with independent authority.

Archdeaconry (n.) The district, office, or residence of an archdeacon. See Benefice.

Archdeaconship (n.) The office of an archdeacon.

Archduchess (n.) The consort of an archduke; also, a princess of the imperial family of Austria. See Archduke.

Arched (a.) Made with an arch or curve; covered with an arch; as, an arched door.

Archegonium (n.) The pistillidium or female organ in the higher cryptogamic plants, corresponding to the pistil in flowering plants.

Archery (n.) Archers, or bowmen, collectively.

Archetypal (a.) Of or pertaining to an archetype; consisting a model (real or ideal) or pattern; original.

Archetype (n.) The standard weight or coin by which others are adjusted.

Archetype (n.) The plan or fundamental structure on which a natural group of animals or plants or their systems of organs are assumed to have been constructed; as, the vertebrate archetype.

Archeus (n.) The vital principle or force which (according to the Paracelsians) presides over the growth and continuation of living beings; the anima mundi or plastic power of the old philosophers.

Archi- () A prefix signifying chief, arch; as, architect, archiepiscopal. In Biol. and Anat. it usually means primitive, original, ancestral; as, archipterygium, the primitive fin or wing.

Archiater (n.) Chief physician; -- a term applied, on the continent of Europe, to the first or body physician of princes and to the first physician of some cities.

Archidiaconal (a.) Of or pertaining to an archdeacon.

Archiepiscopacy (n.) That form of episcopacy in which the chief power is in the hands of archbishops.

Archiepiscopacy (n.) The state or dignity of an archbishop.

Archiepiscopal (a.) Of or pertaining to an archbishop; as, Canterbury is an archiepiscopal see.

Archiepiscopality (n.) The station or dignity of an archbishop; archiepiscopacy.

Archiepiscopate (n.) The office of an archbishop; an archbishopric.

Archimandrite (n.) A chief of a monastery, corresponding to abbot in the Roman Catholic church.

Archimandrite (n.) A superintendent of several monasteries, corresponding to superior abbot, or father provincial, in the Roman Catholic church.

Archimedean (a.) Of or pertaining to Archimedes, a celebrated Greek philosopher; constructed on the principle of Archimedes' screw; as, Archimedean drill, propeller, etc.

Architect (n.) A contriver, designer, or maker.

Architectonical (a.) Pertaining to a master builder, or to architecture; evincing skill in designing or construction; constructive.

Architectural (a.) Of or pertaining to the art of building; conformed to the rules of architecture.

Architrave (n.) The lower division of an entablature, or that part which rests immediately on the column, esp. in classical architecture. See Column.

Archival (a.) Pertaining to, or contained in, archives or records.

Archive (n.) The place in which public records or historic documents are kept.

Archive (n.) Public records or documents preserved as evidence of facts; as, the archives of a country or family.

Archivist (n.) A keeper of archives or records.

Archivolt (n.) The architectural member surrounding the curved opening of an arch, corresponding to the architrave in the case of a square opening.

Archivolt (n.) More commonly, the molding or other ornaments with which the wall face of the voussoirs of an arch is charged.

Arcograph (n.) An instrument for drawing a circular arc without the use of a central point; a cyclograph.

Arctation (n.) Constriction or contraction of some natural passage, as in constipation from inflammation.

Arctic (a.) Pertaining to, or situated under, the northern constellation called the Bear; northern; frigid; as, the arctic pole, circle, region, ocean; an arctic expedition, night, temperature.

Arcturus (n.) A fixed star of the first magnitude in the constellation Bootes.

Arcuation (n.) A mode of propagating trees by bending branches to the ground, and covering the small shoots with earth; layering.

-art () The termination of many English words; as, coward, reynard, drunkard, mostly from the French, in which language this ending is of German origin, being orig. the same word as English hard. It usually has the sense of one who has to a high or excessive degree the quality expressed by the root; as, braggart, sluggard.

Are () The present indicative plural of the substantive verb to be; but etymologically a different word from be, or was. Am, art, are, and is, all come from the root as.

Area (n.) The sunken space or court, giving ingress and affording light to the basement of a building.

Area (n.) The superficial contents of any figure; the surface included within any given lines; superficial extent; as, the area of a square or a triangle.

Area (n.) Extent; scope; range; as, a wide area of thought.

Areed (v. t.) To counsel, advise, warn, or direct.

Areek (adv. & a.) In a reeking condition.

Arena (n.) The area in the central part of an amphitheater, in which the gladiators fought and other shows were exhibited; -- so called because it was covered with sand.

Arena (n.) Any place of public contest or exertion; any sphere of action; as, the arenaof debate; the arena of life.

Arenaceous (a.) Sandy or consisting largely of sand; of the nature of sand; easily disintegrating into sand; friable; as, arenaceous limestone.

Arenicolite (n.) An ancient wormhole in sand, preserved in the rocks.

Areola (n.) An interstice or small space, as between the cracks of the surface in certain crustaceous lichens; or as between the fibers composing organs or vessels that interlace; or as between the nervures of an insect's wing.

Areola (n.) The colored ring around the nipple, or around a vesicle or pustule.

Areolated (a.) Divided into small spaces or areolations, as the wings of insects, the leaves of plants, or the receptacle of compound flowers.

Areolation (n.) Any small space, bounded by some part different in color or structure, as the spaces bounded by the nervures of the wings of insects, or those by the veins of leaves; an areola.

Areopagus (n.) The highest judicial court at Athens. Its sessions were held on Mars' Hill. Hence, any high court or tribunal

Areostyle (a. & n.) See Intercolumniation, and Araeostyle.

Areosystyle (a. & n.) See Intercolumniation, and Araeosystyle.

Arest (n.) A support for the spear when couched for the attack.

Aretaics (n.) The ethical theory which excludes all relations between virtue and happiness; the science of virtue; -- contrasted with eudemonics.

Argal (adv.) A ludicrous corruption of the Latin word ergo, therefore.

Argent (n.) The white color in coats of arms, intended to represent silver, or, figuratively, purity, innocence, beauty, or gentleness; -- represented in engraving by a plain white surface.

Argent (a.) Made of silver; of a silvery color; white; shining.

Argental (a.) Of or pertaining to silver; resembling, containing, or combined with, silver.

Argentan (n.) An alloy of nickel with copper and zinc; German silver.

Argentation (n.) A coating or overlaying with silver.

Argentic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, silver; -- said of certain compounds of silver in which this metal has its lowest proportion; as, argentic chloride.

Argentiferous (a.) Producing or containing silver; as, argentiferous lead ore or veins.

Argentine (n.) White metal coated with silver.

Argentite (n.) Sulphide of silver; -- also called vitreous silver, or silver glance. It has a metallic luster, a lead-gray color, and is sectile like lead.

Argentous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, silver; -- said of certain silver compounds in which silver has a higher proportion than in argentic compounds; as, argentous chloride.

Argillaceous (a.) Of the nature of clay; consisting of, or containing, argil or clay; clayey.

Argillite (n.) Argillaceous schist or slate; clay slate. Its colors is bluish or blackish gray, sometimes greenish gray, brownish red, etc.

Argillo-areenaceous (a.) Consisting of, or containing, clay and sand, as a soil.

Argillo-calcareous (a.) Consisting of, or containing, clay and calcareous earth.

Argo (n.) The name of the ship which carried Jason and his fifty-four companions to Colchis, in quest of the Golden Fleece.

Argo (n.) A large constellation in the southern hemisphere, called also Argo Navis. In modern astronomy it is replaced by its three divisions, Carina, Puppis, and Vela.

Argon (n.) A substance regarded as an element, contained in the atmosphere and remarkable for its chemical inertness.

Argot (n.) A secret language or conventional slang peculiar to thieves, tramps, and vagabonds; flash.

Argue (v. i.) To contend in argument; to dispute; to reason; -- followed by with; as, you may argue with your friend without convincing him.

Argue (v. t.) To debate or discuss; to treat by reasoning; as, the counsel argued the cause before a full court; the cause was well argued.

Argulus (n.) A genus of copepod Crustacea, parasitic of fishes; a fish louse. See Branchiura.

Argument (n.) A reason or reasons offered in proof, to induce belief, or convince the mind; reasoning expressed in words; as, an argument about, concerning, or regarding a proposition, for or in favor of it, or against it.

Argument (n.) A process of reasoning, or a controversy made up of rational proofs; argumentation; discussion; disputation.

Argument (n.) The subject matter of a discourse, writing, or artistic representation; theme or topic; also, an abstract or summary, as of the contents of a book, chapter, poem.

Argumental (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, argument; argumentative.

Argumentation (n.) The act of forming reasons, making inductions, drawing conclusions, and applying them to the case in discussion; the operation of inferring propositions, not known or admitted as true, from facts or principles known, admitted, or proved to be true.

Argumentative (a.) Consisting of, or characterized by, argument; containing a process of reasoning; as, an argumentative discourse.

Argus (n.) A fabulous being of antiquity, said to have had a hundred eyes, who has placed by Juno to guard Io. His eyes were transplanted to the peacock's tail.

Argus (n.) A genus of East Indian pheasants. The common species (A. giganteus) is remarkable for the great length and beauty of the wing and tail feathers of the male. The species A. Grayi inhabits Borneo.

Argus shell () A species of shell (Cypraea argus), beautifully variegated with spots resembling those in a peacock's tail.

Arianize (v. i.) To admit or accept the tenets of the Arians; to become an Arian.

Arianize (v. t.) To convert to Arianism.

Ariel gazelle () A variety of the gazelle (Antilope, / Gazella, dorcas), found in Arabia and adjacent countries.

Aries (n.) A constellation west of Taurus, drawn on the celestial globe in the figure of a ram.

Arietation (n.) Act of striking or conflicting.

Aright (adv.) Rightly; correctly; in a right way or form; without mistake or crime; as, to worship God aright.

Arillus (n.) A exterior covering, forming a false coat or appendage to a seed, as the loose, transparent bag inclosing the seed or the white water lily. The mace of the nutmeg is also an aril.

Arise (v. i.) To come up from a lower to a higher position; to come above the horizon; to come up from one's bed or place of repose; to mount; to ascend; to rise; as, to arise from a kneeling posture; a cloud arose; the sun ariseth; he arose early in the morning.

Arise (v. i.) To spring up; to come into action, being, or notice; to become operative, sensible, or visible; to begin to act a part; to present itself; as, the waves of the sea arose; a persecution arose; the wrath of the king shall arise.

Aristocracy (n.) A ruling body composed of the best citizens.

Aristocracy (n.) The nobles or chief persons in a state; a privileged class or patrician order; (in a popular use) those who are regarded as superior to the rest of the community, as in rank, fortune, or intellect.

Aristocrat (n.) One of the aristocracy or people of rank in a community; one of a ruling class; a noble.

Aristocratical (a.) Of or pertaining to an aristocracy; consisting in, or favoring, a government of nobles, or principal men; as, an aristocratic constitution.

Aristocratism (n.) Aristocrats, collectively.

Aristophanic (a.) Of or pertaining to Aristophanes, the Athenian comic poet.

Arithmetic (n.) The science of numbers; the art of computation by figures.

Arithmetic (n.) A book containing the principles of this science.

Arithmetical (a.) Of or pertaining to arithmetic; according to the rules or method of arithmetic.

Ark (n.) A chest, or coffer.

Ark (n.) The oblong chest of acacia wood, overlaid with gold, which supported the mercy seat with its golden cherubs, and occupied the most sacred place in the sanctuary. In it Moses placed the two tables of stone containing the ten commandments. Called also the Ark of the Covenant.

Arm (n.) The limb of the human body which extends from the shoulder to the hand; also, the corresponding limb of a monkey.

Arm (n.) A limb, or locomotive or prehensile organ, of an invertebrate animal.

Arm (n.) A weapon of offense or defense; an instrument of warfare; -- commonly in the pl.

Arm (v. t.) To furnish or equip with weapons of offense or defense; as, to arm soldiers; to arm the country.

Arm (v. t.) To cover or furnish with a plate, or with whatever will add strength, force, security, or efficiency; as, to arm the hit of a sword; to arm a hook in angling.

Armadillo (n.) Any edentate animal if the family Dasypidae, peculiar to America. The body and head are incased in an armor composed of small bony plates. The armadillos burrow in the earth, seldom going abroad except at night. When attacked, they curl up into a ball, presenting the armor on all sides. Their flesh is good food. There are several species, one of which (the peba) is found as far north as Texas. See Peba, Poyou, Tatouay.

Armament (n.) All the cannon and small arms collectively, with their equipments, belonging to a ship or a fortification.

Armature (n.) A piece of soft iron used to connect the two poles of a magnet, or electro-magnet, in order to complete the circuit, or to receive and apply the magnetic force. In the ordinary horseshoe magnet, it serves to prevent the dissipation of the magnetic force.

Armature (n.) Iron bars or framing employed for the consolidation of a building, as in sustaining slender columns, holding up canopies, etc.

Armillary (n.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a bracelet or ring; consisting of rings or circles.

Armistice (n.) A cessation of arms for a short time, by convention; a temporary suspension of hostilities by agreement; a truce.

Armor (n.) Defensive arms for the body; any clothing or covering worn to protect one's person in battle.

Armor (n.) Steel or iron covering, whether of ships or forts, protecting them from the fire of artillery.

Armorist (n.) One skilled in coat armor or heraldry.

Armory (n.) That branch of heraldry which treats of coat armor.

Arms (n.) The ensigns armorial of a family, consisting of figures and colors borne in shields, banners, etc., as marks of dignity and distinction, and descending from father to son.

Army (n.) A collection or body of men armed for war, esp. one organized in companies, battalions, regiments, brigades, and divisions, under proper officers.

Army worm () A lepidopterous insect, which in the larval state often travels in great multitudes from field to field, destroying grass, grain, and other crops. The common army worm of the northern United States is Leucania unipuncta. The name is often applied to other related species, as the cotton worm.

Army worm () The larva of a small two-winged fly (Sciara), which marches in large companies, in regular order. See Cotton worm, under Cotton.

Arnica (n.) A genus of plants; also, the most important species (Arnica montana), native of the mountains of Europe, used in medicine as a narcotic and stimulant.

Aroma (n.) The quality or principle of plants or other substances which constitutes their fragrance; agreeable odor; as, the aroma of coffee.

Aromatical (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, aroma; fragrant; spicy; strong-scented; odoriferous; as, aromatic balsam.

Around (prep.) On all sides of; encircling; encompassing; so as to make the circuit of; about.

Around (prep.) From one part to another of; at random through; about; on another side of; as, to travel around the country; a house standing around the corner.

Arpen (n.) Formerly, a measure of land in France, varying in different parts of the country. The arpent of Paris was 4,088 sq. yards, or nearly five sixths of an English acre. The woodland arpent was about 1 acre, 1 rood, 1 perch, English.

Arquebuse (n.) A sort of hand gun or firearm a contrivance answering to a trigger, by which the burning match was applied. The musket was a later invention.

Arrack (n.) A name in the East Indies and the Indian islands for all ardent spirits. Arrack is often distilled from a fermented mixture of rice, molasses, and palm wine of the cocoanut tree or the date palm, etc.

Arraign (v. t.) To call or set as a prisoner at the bar of a court to answer to the matter charged in an indictment or complaint.

Arraign (v. t.) To call to account, or accuse, before the bar of reason, taste, or any other tribunal.

Arraignment (n.) The act of arraigning, or the state of being arraigned; the act of calling and setting a prisoner before a court to answer to an indictment or complaint.

Arraignment (n.) A calling to an account to faults; accusation.

Arrangement (n.) The act of arranging or putting in an orderly condition; the state of being arranged or put in order; disposition in suitable form.

Arrangement (n.) Preparatory proceeding or measure; preparation; as, we have made arrangement for receiving company.

Arrangement (n.) Settlement; adjustment by agreement; as, the parties have made an arrangement between themselves concerning their disputes; a satisfactory arrangement.

Arrangement (n.) The adaptation of a composition to voices or instruments for which it was not originally written.

Arrant (a.) Notoriously or preeminently bad; thorough or downright, in a bad sense; shameless; unmitigated; as, an arrant rogue or coward.

Arrastre (n.) A rude apparatus for pulverizing ores, esp. those containing free gold.

Arrasways (adv.) Placed in such a position as to exhibit the top and two sides, the corner being in front; -- said of a rectangular form.

Array (n.) The whole body of persons thus placed in order; an orderly collection; hence, a body of soldiers.

Array (n.) The whole body of jurors summoned to attend the court.

Arrayer (n.) One who arrays. In some early English statutes, applied to an officer who had care of the soldiers' armor, and who saw them duly accoutered.

Arrear (n.) That which is behind in payment, or which remains unpaid, though due; esp. a remainder, or balance which remains due when some part has been paid; arrearage; -- commonly used in the plural, as, arrears of rent, wages, or taxes.

Arrest (v. t.) To rest or fasten; to fix; to concentrate.

Arret (n.) A judgment, decision, or decree of a court or high tribunal; also, a decree of a sovereign.

Arris (n.) The sharp edge or salient angle formed by two surfaces meeting each other, whether plane or curved; -- applied particularly to the edges in moldings, and to the raised edges which separate the flutings in a Doric column.

Arrival (n.) The act of arriving, or coming; the act of reaching a place from a distance, whether by water (as in its original sense) or by land.

Arrival (n.) The attainment or reaching of any object, by effort, or in natural course; as, our arrival at this conclusion was wholly unexpected.

Arrive (v. i.) To come to the shore or bank. In present usage: To come in progress by water, or by traveling on land; to reach by water or by land; -- followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from.

Arrive (v. i.) To reach a point by progressive motion; to gain or compass an object by effort, practice, study, inquiry, reasoning, or experiment.

Arrive (v. i.) To come; said of time; as, the time arrived.

Arrive (v. t.) To reach; to come to.

Arroba (n.) A Spanish weight used in Mexico and South America = 25.36 lbs. avoir.; also, an old Portuguese weight, used in Brazil = 32.38 lbs. avoir.

Arrogance (n.) The act or habit of arrogating, or making undue claims in an overbearing manner; that species of pride which consists in exorbitant claims of rank, dignity, estimation, or power, or which exalts the worth or importance of the person to an undue degree; proud contempt of others; lordliness; haughtiness; self-assumption; presumption.

Arrowroot (n.) A west Indian plant of the genus Maranta, esp. M. arundinacea, now cultivated in many hot countries. It said that the Indians used the roots to neutralize the venom in wounds made by poisoned arrows.

Arroyo (n.) A water course; a rivulet.

Arsenic (n.) One of the elements, a solid substance resembling a metal in its physical properties, but in its chemical relations ranking with the nonmetals. It is of a steel-gray color and brilliant luster, though usually dull from tarnish. It is very brittle, and sublimes at 356¡ Fahrenheit. It is sometimes found native, but usually combined with silver, cobalt, nickel, iron, antimony, or sulphur. Orpiment and realgar are two of its sulphur compounds, the first of which is the true arsenicum of the ancients. The element and its compounds are active poisons. Specific gravity from 5.7 to 5.9. Atomic weight 75. Symbol As.

Arsenic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, arsenic; -- said of those compounds of arsenic in which this element has its highest equivalence; as, arsenic acid.

Arsenical (a.) Of or pertaining to, or containing, arsenic; as, arsenical vapor; arsenical wall papers.

Arsenicate (v. t.) To combine with arsenic; to treat or impregnate with arsenic.

Arsenicism (n.) A diseased condition produced by slow poisoning with arsenic.

Arsenide (n.) A compound of arsenic with a metal, or positive element or radical; -- formerly called arseniuret.

Arsenious (a.) Pertaining to, consisting of, or containing, arsenic; as, arsenious powder or glass.

Arsenopyrite (n.) A mineral of a tin-white color and metallic luster, containing arsenic, sulphur, and iron; -- also called arsenical pyrites and mispickel.

Arsine (n.) A compound of arsenic and hydrogen, AsH3, a colorless and exceedingly poisonous gas, having an odor like garlic; arseniureted hydrogen.

Arson (n.) The malicious burning of a dwelling house or outhouse of another man, which by the common law is felony; the malicious and voluntary firing of a building or ship.

Art () The second person singular, indicative mode, present tense, of the substantive verb Be; but formed after the analogy of the plural are, with the ending -t, as in thou shalt, wilt, orig. an ending of the second person sing. pret. Cf. Be. Now used only in solemn or poetical style.

Art (n.) The employment of means to accomplish some desired end; the adaptation of things in the natural world to the uses of life; the application of knowledge or power to practical purposes.

Art (n.) A system of rules serving to facilitate the performance of certain actions; a system of principles and rules for attaining a desired end; method of doing well some special work; -- often contradistinguished from science or speculative principles; as, the art of building or engraving; the art of war; the art of navigation.

Art (n.) Those branches of learning which are taught in the academical course of colleges; as, master of arts.

Artemisia (n.) A genus of plants including the plants called mugwort, southernwood, and wormwood. Of these A. absinthium, or common wormwood, is well known, and A. tridentata is the sage brush of the Rocky Mountain region.

Arterialization (n.) The process of converting venous blood into arterial blood during its passage through the lungs, oxygen being absorbed and carbonic acid evolved; -- called also aeration and hematosis.

Artery (n.) One of the vessels or tubes which carry either venous or arterial blood from the heart. They have tricker and more muscular walls than veins, and are connected with them by capillaries.

Artery (n.) Hence: Any continuous or ramified channel of communication; as, arteries of trade or commerce.

Artful (a.) Using or exhibiting much art, skill, or contrivance; dexterous; skillful.

Arthroderm (n.) The external covering of an Arthropod.

Arthrogastra (n. pl.) A division of the Arachnida, having the abdomen annulated, including the scorpions, harvestmen, etc.; pedipalpi.

Artichoke (n.) The Cynara scolymus, a plant somewhat resembling a thistle, with a dilated, imbricated, and prickly involucre. The head (to which the name is also applied) is composed of numerous oval scales, inclosing the florets, sitting on a broad receptacle, which, with the fleshy base of the scales, is much esteemed as an article of food.

Article (n.) A distinct portion of an instrument, discourse, literary work, or any other writing, consisting of two or more particulars, or treating of various topics; as, an article in the Constitution. Hence: A clause in a contract, system of regulations, treaty, or the like; a term, condition, or stipulation in a contract; a concise statement; as, articles of agreement.

Article (n.) A literary composition, forming an independent portion of a magazine, newspaper, or cyclopedia.

Article (n.) Subject; matter; concern; distinct.

Article (n.) To bind by articles of covenant or stipulation; as, to article an apprentice to a mechanic.

Article (v. i.) To agree by articles; to stipulate; to bargain; to covenant.

Articulate (a.) Jointed; formed with joints; consisting of segments united by joints; as, articulate animals or plants.

Articulate (v. i.) To join or be connected by articulation.

Articulation (n.) The connection of the parts of a plant by joints, as in pods.

Articulation (n.) The state of being jointed; connection of parts.

Articulation (n.) A sound made by the vocal organs; an articulate utterance or an elementary sound, esp. a consonant.

Artifice (n.) Workmanship; a skillfully contrived work.

Artifice (n.) Artful or skillful contrivance.

Artificer (n.) One who makes or contrives; a deviser, inventor, or framer.

Artificial (a.) Made or contrived by art; produced or modified by human skill and labor, in opposition to natural; as, artificial heat or light, gems, salts, minerals, fountains, flowers.

Artificially (adv.) In an artificial manner; by art, or skill and contrivance, not by nature.

Artillery (n.) The men and officers of that branch of the army to which the care and management of artillery are confided.

Artiodactyla (n. pl.) One of the divisions of the ungulate animals. The functional toes of the hind foot are even in number, and the third digit of each foot (corresponding to the middle finger in man) is asymmetrical and paired with the fourth digit, as in the hog, the sheep, and the ox; -- opposed to Perissodactyla.

Artiste (n.) One peculiarly dexterous and tasteful in almost any employment, as an opera dancer, a hairdresser, a cook.

Artistical (a.) Of or pertaining to art or to artists; made in the manner of an artist; conformable to art; characterized by art; showing taste or skill.

Artistry (n.) Works of art collectively.

Artow () A contraction of art thou.

Art union () An association for promoting art (esp. the arts of design), and giving encouragement to artists.

Arvicole (n.) A mouse of the genus Arvicola; the meadow mouse. There are many species.

Arytenoid (a.) Ladle-shaped; -- applied to two small cartilages of the larynx, and also to the glands, muscles, etc., connected with them. The cartilages are attached to the cricoid cartilage and connected with the vocal cords.

As (adv. & conj.) Denoting equality or likeness in kind, degree, or manner; like; similar to; in the same manner with or in which; in accordance with; in proportion to; to the extent or degree in which or to which; equally; no less than; as, ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil; you will reap as you sow; do as you are bidden.

As (adv. & conj.) In the idea, character, or condition of, -- limiting the view to certain attributes or relations; as, virtue considered as virtue; this actor will appear as Hamlet.

As (adv. & conj.) While; during or at the same time that; when; as, he trembled as he spoke.

As (adv. & conj.) Because; since; it being the case that.

As (adv. & conj.) Expressing concession. (Often approaching though in meaning).

As (adv. & conj.) That, introducing or expressing a result or consequence, after the correlatives so and such.

As (adv. & conj.) As if; as though.

As (adv. & conj.) For instance; by way of example; thus; -- used to introduce illustrative phrases, sentences, or citations.

As (adv. & conj.) Than.

As (adv. & conj.) Expressing a wish.

As (n.) A Roman copper coin, originally of a pound weight (12 oz.); but reduced, after the first Punic war, to two ounces; in the second Punic war, to one ounce; and afterwards to half an ounce.

Asbestic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling asbestus; inconsumable; asbestine.

Asbestine (a.) Of or pertaining to asbestus, or partaking of its nature; incombustible; asbestic.

Asbestos (n.) A variety of amphibole or of pyroxene, occurring in long and delicate fibers, or in fibrous masses or seams, usually of a white, gray, or green-gray color. The name is also given to a similar variety of serpentine.

Ascarid (n.) A parasitic nematoid worm, espec. the roundworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, often occurring in the human intestine, and allied species found in domestic animals; also commonly applied to the pinworm (Oxyuris), often troublesome to children and aged persons.

Ascendant (n.) The horoscope, or that degree of the ecliptic which rises above the horizon at the moment of one's birth; supposed to have a commanding influence on a person's life and fortune.

Ascendant (n.) Superiority, or commanding influence; ascendency; as, one man has the ascendant over another.

Ascendency (n.) Governing or controlling influence; domination; power.

Ascensional (a.) Relating to ascension; connected with ascent; ascensive; tending upward; as, the ascensional power of a balloon.

Ascertain (v. t.) To render (a person) certain; to cause to feel certain; to make confident; to assure; to apprise.

Ascertain (v. t.) To find out or learn for a certainty, by trial, examination, or experiment; to get to know; as, to ascertain the weight of a commodity, or the purity of a metal.

Ascertainment (n.) The act of ascertaining; a reducing to certainty; a finding out by investigation; discovery.

Ascetic (n.) In the early church, one who devoted himself to a solitary and contemplative life, characterized by devotion, extreme self-denial, and self-mortification; a hermit; a recluse; hence, one who practices extreme rigor and self-denial in religious things.

Asceticism (n.) The condition, practice, or mode of life, of ascetics.

Ascham (n.) A sort of cupboard, or case, to contain bows and other implements of archery.

Ascidiarium (n.) The structure which unites together the ascidiozooids in a compound ascidian.

Ascidioidea (n. pl.) A group of Tunicata, often shaped like a two-necked bottle. The group includes, social, and compound species. The gill is a netlike structure within the oral aperture. The integument is usually leathery in texture. See Illustration in Appendix.

Ascidiozooid (n.) One of the individual members of a compound ascidian. See Ascidioidea.

Ascites (n.) A collection of serous fluid in the cavity of the abdomen; dropsy of the peritoneum.

Asclepiad (n.) A choriambic verse, first used by the Greek poet Asclepias, consisting of four feet, viz., a spondee, two choriambi, and an iambus.

Ascococci (pl. ) of Ascococcus

Ascococcus (n.) A form of micrococcus, found in putrid meat infusions, occurring in peculiar masses, each of which is inclosed in a hyaline capsule and contains a large number of spherical micrococci.

Ascospore (n.) One of the spores contained in the asci of lichens and fungi. [See Illust. of Ascus.]

Ascribe (v. t.) To attribute, as a quality, or an appurtenance; to consider or allege to belong.

Ashamed (a.) Affected by shame; abashed or confused by guilt, or a conviction or consciousness of some wrong action or impropriety.

Ash-colored (a.) Of the color of ashes; a whitish gray or brownish gray.

Ashen (a.) Consisting of, or resembling, ashes; of a color between brown and gray, or white and gray.

Ashes (n. pl.) The earthy or mineral particles of combustible substances remaining after combustion, as of wood or coal.

Ashes (n. pl.) The color of ashes; deathlike paleness.

Ashy (a.) Pertaining to, or composed of, ashes; filled, or strewed with, ashes.

Ashy (a.) Ash-colored; whitish gray; deadly pale.

Aside (adv.) On, or to, one side; out of a straight line, course, or direction; at a little distance from the rest; out of the way; apart.

Asininity (n.) The quality of being asinine; stupidity combined with obstinacy.

Ask (v. t.) To interrogate or inquire of or concerning; to put a question to or about; to question.

Askew (adv. & a.) Awry; askance; asquint; oblique or obliquely; -- sometimes indicating scorn, or contempt, or entry.

Asomatous (a.) Without a material body; incorporeal.

Asp (n.) A small, hooded, poisonous serpent of Egypt and adjacent countries, whose bite is often fatal. It is the Naja haje. The name is also applied to other poisonous serpents, esp. to Vipera aspis of southern Europe. See Haje.

Aspect (n.) Look, or particular appearance of the face; countenance; mien; air.

Aspect (n.) Position or situation with regard to seeing; that position which enables one to look in a particular direction; position in relation to the points of the compass; as, a house has a southern aspect, that is, a position which faces the south.

Asper (n.) A Turkish money of account (formerly a coin), of little value; the 120th part of a piaster.

Asperation (n.) The act of asperating; a making or becoming rough.

Asphaltum (n.) Mineral pitch, Jews' pitch, or compact native bitumen. It is brittle, of a black or brown color and high luster on a surface of fracture; it melts and burns when heated, leaving no residue. It occurs on the surface and shores of the Dead Sea, which is therefore called Asphaltites, or the Asphaltic Lake. It is found also in many parts of Asia, Europe, and America. See Bitumen.

Asphaltum (n.) A composition of bitumen, pitch, lime, and gravel, used for forming pavements, and as a water-proof cement for bridges, roofs, etc.; asphaltic cement. Artificial asphalt is prepared from coal tar, lime, sand, etc.

Asphalt (v. t.) To cover with asphalt; as, to asphalt a roof; asphalted streets.

Asphaltic (a.) Pertaining to, of the nature of, or containing, asphalt; bituminous.

Asphyxy (n.) Apparent death, or suspended animation; the condition which results from interruption of respiration, as in suffocation or drowning, or the inhalation of irrespirable gases.

Asphyxiate (v. t.) To bring to a state of asphyxia; to suffocate. [Used commonly in the past pple.]

Aspic (n.) A savory meat jelly containing portions of fowl, game, fish, hard boiled eggs, etc.

Aspirate (v. t.) To pronounce with a breathing, an aspirate, or an h sound; as, we aspirate the words horse and house; to aspirate a vowel or a liquid consonant.

Aspirate (n.) A sound consisting of, or characterized by, a breath like the sound of h; the breathing h or a character representing such a sound; an aspirated sound.

Aspirate (n.) An elementary sound produced by the breath alone; a surd, or nonvocal consonant; as, f, th in thin, etc.

Aspirator (n.) An instrument for the evacuation of the fluid contents of tumors or collections of blood.

Ass (n.) A quadruped of the genus Equus (E. asinus), smaller than the horse, and having a peculiarly harsh bray and long ears. The tame or domestic ass is patient, slow, and sure-footed, and has become the type of obstinacy and stupidity. There are several species of wild asses which are swift-footed.

Assail (v. t.) To encounter or meet purposely with the view of mastering, as an obstacle, difficulty, or the like.

Assail (v. t.) To attack morally, or with a view to produce changes in the feelings, character, conduct, existing usages, institutions; to attack by words, hostile influence, etc.; as, to assail one with appeals, arguments, abuse, ridicule, and the like.

Assamar (n.) The peculiar bitter substance, soft or liquid, and of a yellow color, produced when meat, bread, gum, sugar, starch, and the like, are roasted till they turn brown.

Assart (n.) The act or offense of grubbing up trees and bushes, and thus destroying the thickets or coverts of a forest.

Assart (v. t.) To grub up, as trees; to commit an assart upon; as, to assart land or trees.

Assault (n.) A violent onset or attack with moral weapons, as words, arguments, appeals, and the like; as, to make an assault on the prerogatives of a prince, or on the constitution of a government.

Assault (n.) An apparently violent attempt, or willful offer with force or violence, to do hurt to another; an attempt or offer to beat another, accompanied by a degree of violence, but without touching his person, as by lifting the fist, or a cane, in a threatening manner, or by striking at him, and missing him. If the blow aimed takes effect, it is a battery.

Assay (n.) The act or process of ascertaining the proportion of a particular metal in an ore or alloy; especially, the determination of the proportion of gold or silver in bullion or coin.

Assay (v.) To subject, as an ore, alloy, or other metallic compound, to chemical or metallurgical examination, in order to determine the amount of a particular metal contained in it, or to ascertain its composition.

Assayer (n.) One who assays. Specifically: One who examines metallic ores or compounds, for the purpose of determining the amount of any particular metal in the same, especially of gold or silver.

Assemblage (n.) A collection of individuals, or of individuals, or of particular things; as, a political assemblage; an assemblage of ideas.

Assemble (v. t.) To collect into one place or body; to bring or call together; to convene; to congregate.

Assemble (v. i.) To meet or come together, as a number of individuals; to convene; to congregate.

Assemble (v. i.) To liken; to compare.

Assembly (n.) A company of persons collected together in one place, and usually for some common purpose, esp. for deliberation and legislation, for worship, or for social entertainment.

Assembly (n.) A collection of inanimate objects.

Assent (v. t.) To admit a thing as true; to express one's agreement, acquiescence, concurrence, or concession.

Assent (v.) The act of assenting; the act of the mind in admitting or agreeing to anything; concurrence with approval; consent; agreement; acquiescence.

Assentation (n.) Insincere, flattering, or obsequious assent; hypocritical or pretended concurrence.

Assentive (a.) Giving assent; of the nature of assent; complying.

Assertive (a.) Positive; affirming confidently; affirmative; peremptory.

Assess (v.) To apportion a sum to be paid by (a person, a community, or an estate), in the nature of a tax, fine, etc.; to impose a tax upon (a person, an estate, or an income) according to a rate or apportionment.

Assess (v.) To determine and impose a tax or fine upon (a person, community, estate, or income); to tax; as, the club assessed each member twenty-five cents.

Assessorial (a.) Of or pertaining to an assessor, or to a court of assessors.

Assets (n. pl.) The entire property of all sorts, belonging to a person, a corporation, or an estate; as, the assets of a merchant or a trading association; -- opposed to liabilities.

Assiduous (a.) Performed with constant diligence or attention; unremitting; persistent; as, assiduous labor.

Assientist (n.) A shareholder of the Assiento company; one of the parties to the Assiento contract.

Assiento (n.) A contract or convention between Spain and other powers for furnishing negro slaves for the Spanish dominions in America, esp. the contract made with Great Britain in 1713.

Assign (v. t.) To fix, specify, select, or designate; to point out authoritatively or exactly; as, to assign a limit; to assign counsel for a prisoner; to assign a day for trial.

Assignation (n.) An appointment of time and place for meeting or interview; -- used chiefly of love interviews, and now commonly in a bad sense.

Assignee (v.) In England, the persons appointed, under a commission of bankruptcy, to manage the estate of a bankrupt for the benefit of his creditors.

Assignment (n.) An allotting or an appointment to a particular person or use; or for a particular time, as of a cause or causes in court.

Assimilable (a.) That may be assimilated; that may be likened, or appropriated and incorporated.

Assimilate (v. t.) To bring to a likeness or to conformity; to cause a resemblance between.

Assimilate (v. t.) To liken; to compa/e.

Assimilate (v. t.) To appropriate and transform or incorporate into the substance of the assimilating body; to absorb or appropriate, as nourishment; as, food is assimilated and converted into organic tissue.

Assimilate (v. i.) To become similar or like something else.

Assimilate (v. i.) To be converted into the substance of the assimilating body; to become incorporated; as, some kinds of food assimilate more readily than others.

Assimilation (n.) The conversion of nutriment into the fluid or solid substance of the body, by the processes of digestion and absorption, whether in plants or animals.

Assimulate (v. t.) To feign; to counterfeit; to simulate; to resemble.

Assist (v. t.) To give support to in some undertaking or effort, or in time of distress; to help; to aid; to succor.

Assistance (n.) The act of assisting; help; aid; furtherance; succor; support.

Assistant (a.) Of the second grade in the staff of the army; as, an assistant surgeon.

Assize (n.) A court, the sitting or session of a court, for the trial of processes, whether civil or criminal, by a judge and jury.

Assize (n.) The periodical sessions of the judges of the superior courts in every county of England for the purpose of administering justice in the trial and determination of civil and criminal cases; -- usually in the plural.

Assize (n.) The time or place of holding the court of assize; -- generally in the plural, assizes.

Associable (a.) Sociable; companionable.

Associate (v. t.) To join with one, as a friend, companion, partner, or confederate; as, to associate others with us in business, or in an enterprise.

Associate (v. t.) To join or connect; to combine in acting; as, particles of gold associated with other substances.

Associate (v. t.) To connect or place together in thought.

Associate (v. t.) To accompany; to keep company with.

Associate (v. i.) To unite in company; to keep company, implying intimacy; as, congenial minds are disposed to associate.

Associate (a.) Closely connected or joined with some other, as in interest, purpose, employment, or office; sharing responsibility or authority; as, an associate judge.

Associate (a.) Connected by habit or sympathy; as, associate motions, such as occur sympathetically, in consequence of preceding motions.

Associate (n.) A companion; one frequently in company with another, implying intimacy or equality; a mate; a fellow.

Associate (n.) A partner in interest, as in business; or a confederate in a league.

Associate (n.) One connected with an association or institution without the full rights or privileges of a regular member; as, an associate of the Royal Academy.

Associate (n.) Anything closely or usually connected with another; an concomitant.

Associated (a.) Joined as a companion; brought into association; accompanying; combined.

Association (n.) The act of associating, or state of being associated; union; connection, whether of persons of things.

Association (n.) Mental connection, or that which is mentally linked or associated with a thing.

Association (n.) Union of persons in a company or society for some particular purpose; as, the American Association for the Advancement of Science; a benevolent association. Specifically, as among the Congregationalists, a society, consisting of a number of ministers, generally the pastors of neighboring churches, united for promoting the interests of religion and the harmony of the churches.

Associator (n.) An associate; a confederate or partner in any scheme.

Assoilyie (v. t.) To absolve; to acquit by sentence of court.

Assonance (n.) A peculiar species of rhyme, in which the last acce`ted vow`l and tnose whioh follow it in one word correspond in sound with the vowels of another word, while the consonants of the two words are unlike in sound; as, calamo and platano, baby and chary.

Assonance (n.) Incomplete correspondence.

Assonant (a.) Pertaining to the peculiar species of rhyme called assonance; not consonant.

Assonate (v. i.) To correspond in sound.

Assort (v. i.) To agree; to be in accordance; to be adapted; to suit; to fall into a class or place.

Assortment (n.) A collection or quantity of things distributed into kinds or sorts; a number of things assorted.

Assortment (n.) A collection containing a variety of sorts or kinds adapted to various wants, demands, or purposes; as, an assortment of goods.

Assumpsit (n.) A promise or undertaking, founded on a consideration. This promise may be oral or in writing not under seal. It may be express or implied.

Assumpsit (n.) An action to recover damages for a breach or nonperformance of a contract or promise, express or implied, oral or in writing not under seal. Common or indebitatus assumpsit is brought for the most part on an implied promise. Special assumpsit is founded on an express promise or undertaking.

Assumption (n.) The minor or second proposition in a categorical syllogism.

Assurance (n.) The act of assuring; a declaration tending to inspire full confidence; that which is designed to give confidence.

Assurance (n.) The state of being assured; firm persuasion; full confidence or trust; freedom from doubt; certainty.

Assurance (n.) Firmness of mind; undoubting, steadiness; intrepidity; courage; confidence; self-reliance.

Assurance (n.) Insurance; a contract for the payment of a sum on occasion of a certain event, as loss or death.

Assurance (n.) Any written or other legal evidence of the conveyance of property; a conveyance; a deed.

Assure (v. t.) To make sure or certain; to render confident by a promise, declaration, or other evidence.

Assure (v. t.) To declare to, solemnly; to assert to (any one) with the design of inspiring belief or confidence.

Assure (v. t.) To confirm; to make certain or secure.

Assure (v. t.) To insure; to covenant to indemnify for loss, or to pay a specified sum at death. See Insure.

Assuredness (n.) The state of being assured; certainty; full confidence.

Assuring (a.) That assures; tending to assure; giving confidence.

Astacus (n.) A genus of crustaceans, containing the crawfish of fresh-water lobster of Europe, and allied species of western North America. See Crawfish.

Astarte (n.) A genus of bivalve mollusks, common on the coasts of America and Europe.

Aster (n.) A genus of herbs with compound white or bluish flowers; starwort; Michaelmas daisy.

Aster (n.) A plant of the genus Callistephus. Many varieties (called China asters, German asters, etc.) are cultivated for their handsome compound flowers.

Asterism (n.) A constellation.

Asterophyllite (n.) A fossil plant from the coal formations of Europe and America, now regarded as the branchlets and foliage of calamites.

Asthma (n.) A disease, characterized by difficulty of breathing (due to a spasmodic contraction of the bronchi), recurring at intervals, accompanied with a wheezing sound, a sense of constriction in the chest, a cough, and expectoration.

Asthmatical (a.) Of or pertaining to asthma; as, an asthmatic cough; liable to, or suffering from, asthma; as, an asthmatic patient.

Astigmatism (n.) A defect of the eye or of a lens, in consequence of which the rays derived from one point are not brought to a single focal point, thus causing imperfect images or indistinctness of vision.

Astonish (v. t.) To strike with sudden fear, terror, or wonder; to amaze; to surprise greatly, as with something unaccountable; to confound with some sudden emotion or passion.

Astonishment (n.) The condition of one who is stunned. Hence: Numbness; loss of sensation; stupor; loss of sense.

Astonishment (n.) Dismay; consternation.

Astonishment (n.) The overpowering emotion excited when something unaccountable, wonderful, or dreadful is presented to the mind; an intense degree of surprise; amazement.

Astound (a.) To astonish; to strike with amazement; to confound with wonder, surprise, or fear.

Astraean (n.) A coral of the family Astraeidae; a star coral.

Astragal (n.) A convex molding of rounded surface, generally from half to three quarters of a circle.

Astragalus (n.) A genus of papilionaceous plants, of the tribe Galegeae, containing numerous species, two of which are called, in English, milk vetch and licorice vetch. Gum tragacanth is obtained from different oriental species, particularly the A. gummifer and A. verus.

Astral (a.) Pertaining to, coming from, or resembling, the stars; starry; starlike.

Astrict (v. t.) To bind up; to confine; to constrict; to contract.

Astrict (v. t.) To bind; to constrain; to restrict; to limit.

Astrict (a.) Concise; contracted.

Astriction (n.) A contraction of parts by applications; the action of an astringent substance on the animal economy.

Astringe (v. t.) To bind fast; to constrict; to contract; to cause parts to draw together; to compress.

Astringency (n.) The quality of being astringent; the power of contracting the parts of the body; that quality in medicines or other substances which causes contraction of the organic textures; as, the astringency of tannin.

Astringent (a.) Drawing together the tissues; binding; contracting; -- opposed to laxative; as, astringent medicines; a butter and astringent taste; astringent fruit.

Astringent (n.) A medicine or other substance that produces contraction in the soft organic textures, and checks discharges of blood, mucus, etc.

Astringer (n.) A falconer who keeps a goshawk.

Astro- () The combining form of the Greek word 'a`stron, meaning star.

Astrometer (n.) An instrument for comparing the relative amount of the light of stars.

Astronomical (a.) Of or pertaining to astronomy; in accordance with the methods or principles of astronomy.

Astronomy (n.) The science which treats of the celestial bodies, of their magnitudes, motions, distances, periods of revolution, eclipses, constitution, physical condition, and of the causes of their various phenomena.

Astroscope (n.) An old astronomical instrument, formed of two cones, on whose surface the constellations were delineated.

Astroscopy (n.) Observation of the stars.

Astructive (a.) Building up; constructive; -- opposed to destructive.

Astylar (a.) Without columns or pilasters.

Asylum (n.) A sanctuary or place of refuge and protection, where criminals and debtors found shelter, and from which they could not be forcibly taken without sacrilege.

Asymmetral (a.) Incommensurable; also, unsymmetrical.

Asymmetrical (a.) Incommensurable.

Asymmetry (n.) Incommensurability.

Asymptote (n.) A line which approaches nearer to some curve than assignable distance, but, though infinitely extended, would never meet it. Asymptotes may be straight lines or curves. A rectilinear asymptote may be conceived as a tangent to the curve at an infinite distance.

Asynartete (a.) Disconnected; not fitted or adjusted.

Asyndetic (a.) Characterized by the use of asyndeton; not connected by conjunctions.

Asyndeton (n.) A figure which omits the connective; as, I came, I saw, I conquered. It stands opposed to polysyndeton.

Asystole (n.) A weakening or cessation of the contractile power of the heart.

At (prep.) The relation of some state or condition; as, at war; at peace; at ease; at your service; at fault; at liberty; at risk; at disadvantage.

At (prep.) The relation of a point or position in a series, or of degree, rate, or value; as, with the thermometer at 80¡; goods sold at a cheap price; a country estimated at 10,000 square miles; life is short at the longest.

At (prep.) The relations of source, occasion, reason, consequence, or effect; as, at the sight; at this news; merry at anything; at this declaration; at his command; to demand, require, receive, deserve, endure at your hands.

Atacamite (n.) An oxychloride of copper, usually in emerald-green prismatic crystals.

Ataxy (n.) The state of disorder that characterizes nervous fevers and the nervous condition.

Ataxic (a.) Characterized by ataxy, that is, (a) by great irregularity of functions or symptoms, or (b) by a want of coordinating power in movements.

Athanor (n.) A digesting furnace, formerly used by alchemists. It was so constructed as to maintain uniform and durable heat.

Atheistical (a.) Pertaining to, implying, or containing, atheism; -- applied to things; as, atheistic doctrines, opinions, or books.

Atheize (v. i.) To discourse, argue, or act as an atheist.

Atheroma (n.) An encysted tumor containing curdy matter.

Atheroma (n.) A disease characterized by thickening and fatty degeneration of the inner coat of the arteries.

Athlete (n.) One who contended for a prize in the public games of ancient Greece or Rome.

Athlete (n.) Any one trained to contend in exercises requiring great physical agility and strength; one who has great activity and strength; a champion.

Athlete (n.) One fitted for, or skilled in, intellectual contests; as, athletes of debate.

Athwart (prep.) Across the direction or course of; as, a fleet standing athwart our course.

Athwart (adv.) Across the course; so as to thwart; perversely.

Atlantes (n. pl.) Figures or half figures of men, used as columns to support an entablature; -- called also telamones. See Caryatides.

Atlas (n.) A collection of maps in a volume

Atmo (n.) The standard atmospheric pressure used in certain physical measurements calculations; conventionally, that pressure under which the barometer stands at 760 millimeters, at a temperature of 0¡ Centigrade, at the level of the sea, and in the latitude of Paris.

Atmosphere (n.) Any surrounding or pervading influence or condition.

Atmosphere (n.) The portion of air in any locality, or affected by a special physical or sanitary condition; as, the atmosphere of the room; a moist or noxious atmosphere.

Atoll (n.) A coral island or islands, consisting of a belt of coral reef, partly submerged, surrounding a central lagoon or depression; a lagoon island.

Atom (n.) A constituent particle of matter, or a molecule supposed to be made up of subordinate particles.

Atom (n.) The smallest particle of matter that can enter into combination; one of the elementary constituents of a molecule.

Atomically (adv.) In an atomic manner; in accordance with the atomic philosophy.

Atomizer (n.) One who, or that which, atomizes; esp., an instrument for reducing a liquid to spray for disinfecting, cooling, or perfuming.

At one () In concord or friendship; in agreement (with each other); as, to be, bring, make, or set, at one, i. e., to be or bring in or to a state of agreement or reconciliation.

Atone (v. i.) To agree; to be in accordance; to accord.

Atone (v. i.) To stand as an equivalent; to make reparation, compensation, or amends, for an offense or a crime.

Atone (v. t.) To set at one; to reduce to concord; to reconcile, as parties at variance; to appease.

Atonement (n.) Reconciliation; restoration of friendly relations; agreement; concord.

Atonic (n.) An element of speech entirely destitute of vocality, or produced by the breath alone; a nonvocal or surd consonant; a breathing.

Atony (n.) Want of tone; weakness of the system, or of any organ, especially of such as are contractile.

Atramentarious (a.) Like ink; suitable for making ink. Sulphate of iron (copperas, green vitriol) is called atramentarious, as being used in making ink.

Atrede (v. t.) To surpass in council.

Atrium (n.) An open court with a porch or gallery around three or more sides; especially at the entrance of a basilica or other church. The name was extended in the Middle Ages to the open churchyard or cemetery.

Atrophy (v. t.) To cause to waste away or become abortive; to starve or weaken.

Atropism (n.) A condition of the system produced by long use of belladonna.

Atrypa (n.) A extinct genus of Branchiopoda, very common in Silurian limestones.

Attach (v. t.) To bind, fasten, tie, or connect; to make fast or join; as, to attach one thing to another by a string, by glue, or the like.

Attach (v. t.) To connect; to place so as to belong; to assign by authority; to appoint; as, an officer is attached to a certain regiment, company, or ship.

Attach (v. t.) To win the heart of; to connect by ties of love or self-interest; to attract; to fasten or bind by moral influence; -- with to; as, attached to a friend; attaching others to us by wealth or flattery.

Attach (v. t.) To connect, in a figurative sense; to ascribe or attribute; to affix; -- with to; as, to attach great importance to a particular circumstance.

Attach (v. t.) To take by legal authority: (a) To arrest by writ, and bring before a court, as to answer for a debt, or a contempt; -- applied to a taking of the person by a civil process; being now rarely used for the arrest of a criminal. (b) To seize or take (goods or real estate) by virtue of a writ or precept to hold the same to satisfy a judgment which may be rendered in the suit. See Attachment, 4.

Attach (v. i.) To come into legal operation in connection with anything; to vest; as, dower will attach.

Attachment (n.) That by which one thing is attached to another; connection; as, to cut the attachments of a muscle.

Attachment (n.) The writ or percept commanding such seizure or taking.

Attack (v. t.) To assail with unfriendly speech or writing; to begin a controversy with; to attempt to overthrow or bring into disrepute, by criticism or satire; to censure; as, to attack a man, or his opinions, in a pamphlet.

Attack (v. t.) To begin to affect; to begin to act upon, injuriously or destructively; to begin to decompose or waste.

Attack (n.) The beginning of corrosive, decomposing, or destructive action, by a chemical agent.

Attain (v. t.) To achieve or accomplish, that is, to reach by efforts; to gain; to compass; as, to attain rest.

Attain (v. t.) To reach or come to, by progression or motion; to arrive at.

Attain (v. i.) To come or arrive, by motion, growth, bodily exertion, or efforts toward a place, object, state, etc.; to reach.

Attain (v. i.) To come or arrive, by an effort of mind.

Attainable (a.) Capable of being attained or reached by efforts of the mind or body; capable of being compassed or accomplished by efforts directed to the object.

Attainder (n.) The act of attainting, or the state of being attainted; the extinction of the civil rights and capacities of a person, consequent upon sentence of death or outlawry; as, an act of attainder.

Attainder (n.) A stain or staining; state of being in dishonor or condemnation.

Attaint (v. t.) To find guilty; to convict; -- said esp. of a jury on trial for giving a false verdict.

Attaint (v. t.) To subject (a person) to the legal condition formerly resulting from a sentence of death or outlawry, pronounced in respect of treason or felony; to affect by attainder.

Attaint (v. t.) To affect or infect, as with physical or mental disease or with moral contagion; to taint or corrupt.

Attaint (p. p.) Attainted; corrupted.

Attaint (v.) A writ which lies after judgment, to inquire whether a jury has given a false verdict in any court of record; also, the convicting of the jury so tried.

Attaintment (n.) Attainder; attainture; conviction.

Attaminate (v. t.) To corrupt; to defile; to contaminate.

Attemper (v. t.) To accommodate; to make suitable; to adapt.

Attempt (v. t.) To try to win, subdue, or overcome; as, one who attempts the virtue of a woman.

Attempt (n.) A essay, trial, or endeavor; an undertaking; an attack, or an effort to gain a point; esp. an unsuccessful, as contrasted with a successful, effort.

Attend (v. t.) To go or stay with, as a companion, nurse, or servant; to visit professionally, as a physician; to accompany or follow in order to do service; to escort; to wait on; to serve.

Attend (v. t.) To be present with; to accompany; to be united or consequent to; as, a measure attended with ill effects.

Attend (v. t.) To be present at; as, to attend church, school, a concert, a business meeting.

Attend (v. i.) To apply the mind, or pay attention, with a view to perceive, understand, or comply; to pay regard; to heed; to listen; -- usually followed by to.

Attend (v. i.) To accompany or be present or near at hand, in pursuance of duty; to be ready for service; to wait or be in waiting; -- often followed by on or upon.

Attendancy (n.) The quality of attending or accompanying; attendance; an attendant.

Attendant (v. t.) Being present, or in the train; accompanying; in waiting.

Attendant (v. t.) Accompanying, connected with, or immediately following, as consequential; consequent; as, intemperance with all its attendant evils.

Attendant (n.) One who attends or accompanies in any character whatever, as a friend, companion, servant, agent, or suitor.

Attendant (n.) That which accompanies; a concomitant.

Attentat (n.) A proceeding in a court of judicature, after an inhibition is decreed.

Attention (n.) The act or state of attending or heeding; the application of the mind to any object of sense, representation, or thought; notice; exclusive or special consideration; earnest consideration, thought, or regard; obedient or affectionate heed; the supposed power or faculty of attending.

Attention (n.) An act of civility or courtesy; care for the comfort and pleasure of others; as, attentions paid to a stranger.

Attentive (a.) Heedful of the comfort of others; courteous.

Attenuate (v. t.) To make thin or less consistent; to render less viscid or dense; to rarefy. Specifically: To subtilize, as the humors of the body, or to break them into finer parts.

Attenuate (v. t.) To lessen the amount, force, or value of; to make less complex; to weaken.

Attenuate (v. i.) To become thin, slender, or fine; to grow less; to lessen.

Atter (n.) Poison; venom; corrupt matter from a sore.

Attercop (n.) A spider.

Attercop (n.) A peevish, ill-natured person.

Attest (v. t.) To bear witness to; to certify; to affirm to be true or genuine; as, to attest the truth of a writing, a copy of record.

Atticism (n.) The style and idiom of the Greek language, used by the Athenians; a concise and elegant expression.

Atticize (v. t.) To conform or make conformable to the language, customs, etc., of Attica.

Atticize (v. i.) To use the Attic idiom or style; to conform to the customs or modes of thought of the Athenians.

Attiguous (a.) Touching; bordering; contiguous.

Attire (n.) The internal parts of a flower, included within the calyx and the corolla.

Attle (n.) Rubbish or refuse consisting of broken rock containing little or no ore.

Attorn (v. t.) To agree to become tenant to one to whom reversion has been granted.

Attornment (n.) The act of a feudatory, vassal, or tenant, by which he consents, upon the alienation of an estate, to receive a new lord or superior, and transfers to him his homage and service; the agreement of a tenant to acknowledge the purchaser of the estate as his landlord.

Attract (v. t.) To draw to, or cause to tend to; esp. to cause to approach, adhere, or combine; or to cause to resist divulsion, separation, or decomposition.

Attraction (n.) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to produce their cohesion or combination, and conversely resisting separation.

Attribute (v. t.) To ascribe; to consider (something) as due or appropriate (to); to refer, as an effect to a cause; to impute; to assign; to consider as belonging (to).

Attribute (n.) That which is attributed; a quality which is considered as belonging to, or inherent in, a person or thing; an essential or necessary property or characteristic.

Attribute (n.) A conventional symbol of office, character, or identity, added to any particular figure; as, a club is the attribute of Hercules.

Attrite (a.) Repentant from fear of punishment; having attrition of grief for sin; -- opposed to contrite.

Attune (v. t.) To arrange fitly; to make accordant.

Aubade (n.) An open air concert in the morning, as distinguished from an evening serenade; also, a pianoforte composition suggestive of morning.

Aubin (n.) A broken gait of a horse, between an amble and a gallop; -- commonly called a Canterbury gallop.

Auburn (a.) Flaxen-colored.

Audacious (a.) Contemning the restraints of law, religion, or decorum; bold in wickedness; presumptuous; impudent; insolent.

Audacious (a.) Committed with, or proceedings from, daring effrontery or contempt of law, morality, or decorum.

Audacity (n.) Daring spirit, resolution, or confidence; venturesomeness.

Audacity (n.) Reckless daring; presumptuous impudence; -- implying a contempt of law or moral restraints.

Audience (a.) Admittance to a hearing; a formal interview, esp. with a sovereign or the head of a government, for conference or the transaction of business.

Audiometer (n.) An instrument by which the power of hearing can be gauged and recorded on a scale.

Audiphone (n.) An instrument which, placed against the teeth, conveys sound to the auditory nerve and enables the deaf to hear more or less distinctly; a dentiphone.

Audit (a.) The result of such an examination, or an account as adjusted by auditors; final account.

Audit (v. t.) To examine and adjust, as an account or accounts; as, to audit the accounts of a treasure, or of parties who have a suit depending in court.

Audit (v. i.) To settle or adjust an account.

Audita querela () A writ which lies for a party against whom judgment is recovered, but to whom good matter of discharge has subsequently accrued which could not have been availed of to prevent such judgment.

Auditor (a.) A person appointed and authorized to audit or examine an account or accounts, compare the charges with the vouchers, examine the parties and witnesses, allow or reject charges, and state the balance.

Auditor (a.) One who hears judicially, as in an audience court.

Augean (a.) Of or pertaining to Augeus, king of Elis, whose stable contained 3000 oxen, and had not been cleaned for 30 years. Hercules cleansed it in a single day.

Augean (a.) Hence: Exceedingly filthy or corrupt.

Auget (n.) A priming tube connecting the charge chamber with the gallery, or place where the slow match is applied.

Augite (n.) A variety of pyroxene, usually of a black or dark green color, occurring in igneous rocks, such as basalt; -- also used instead of the general term pyroxene.

Augitic (a.) Pertaining to, or like, augite; containing augite as a principal constituent; as, augitic rocks.

Augmentation (n.) A additional charge to a coat of arms, given as a mark of honor.

Augmentation (n.) In counterpoint and fugue, a repetition of the subject in tones of twice the original length.

Augur (v. i.) To conjecture from signs or omens; to prognosticate; to foreshow.

August (a.) The eighth month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

Augustinian (n.) One of a class of divines, who, following St. Augustine, maintain that grace by its nature is effectual absolutely and creatively, not relatively and conditionally.

Aularian (n.) At Oxford, England, a member of a hall, distinguished from a collegian.

Auld lang syne () A Scottish phrase used in recalling recollections of times long since past.

Aulic (a.) Pertaining to a royal court.

Aulic (n.) The ceremony observed in conferring the degree of doctor of divinity in some European universities. It begins by a harangue of the chancellor addressed to the young doctor, who then receives the cap, and presides at the disputation (also called the aulic).

Aumery (n.) A form of Ambry, a closet; but confused with Almonry, as if a place for alms.

Aune (n.) A French cloth measure, of different parts of the country (at Paris, 0.95 of an English ell); -- now superseded by the meter.

Aunt (n.) The sister of one's father or mother; -- correlative to nephew or niece. Also applied to an uncle's wife.

Aura (n.) The peculiar sensation, as of a light vapor, or cold air, rising from the trunk or limbs towards the head, a premonitory symptom of epilepsy or hysterics.

Aurantiaceous (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the Aurantiaceae, an order of plants (formerly considered natural), of which the orange is the type.

Aurate (n.) A combination of auric acid with a base; as, aurate or potassium.

Aurated (a.) Resembling or containing gold; gold-colored; gilded.

Aurelia (n.) The chrysalis, or pupa of an insect, esp. when reflecting a brilliant golden color, as that of some of the butterflies.

Aurelia (n.) A genus of jellyfishes. See Discophora.

Aurelian (n.) An amateur collector and breeder of insects, esp. of butterflies and moths; a lepidopterist.

Aureole (n.) A celestial crown or accidental glory added to the bliss of heaven, as a reward to those (as virgins, martyrs, preachers, etc.) who have overcome the world, the flesh, and the devil.

Auric (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, gold; -- said of those compounds of gold in which this element has its higher valence; as, auric oxide; auric chloride.

Aurichalceous (a.) Brass-colored.

Aurichalcite (n.) A hydrous carbonate of copper and zinc, found in pale green or blue crystalline aggregations. It yields a kind of brass on reduction.

Auricular (a.) Told in the ear, i. e., told privately; as, auricular confession to the priest.

Auricular (a.) Recognized by the ear; known by the sense of hearing; as, auricular evidence.

Auriferous (a.) Gold-bearing; containing or producing gold.

Auriga (n.) The Charioteer, or Wagoner, a constellation in the northern hemisphere, situated between Perseus and Gemini. It contains the bright star Capella.

Aurin (n.) A red coloring matter derived from phenol; -- called also, in commerce, yellow corallin.

Auriphrygiate (a.) Embroidered or decorated with gold.

Auriscope (n.) An instrument for examining the condition of the ear.

Auriscopy (n.) Examination of the ear by the aid of the auriscope.

Aurocephalous (a.) Having a gold-colored head.

Aurochloride (n.) The trichloride of gold combination with the chloride of another metal, forming a double chloride; -- called also chloraurate.

Aurochs (n.) The European bison (Bison bonasus, / Europaeus), once widely distributed, but now nearly extinct, except where protected in the Lithuanian forests, and perhaps in the Caucasus. It is distinct from the Urus of Caesar, with which it has often been confused.

Aurous (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, gold; -- said of those compounds of gold in which this element has its lower valence; as, aurous oxide.

Auscultation (n.) An examination by listening either directly with the ear (immediate auscultation) applied to parts of the body, as the abdomen; or with the stethoscope (mediate auscultation), in order to distinguish sounds recognized as a sign of health or of disease.

Auspicate (v. t.) To give a favorable turn to in commencing; to inaugurate; -- a sense derived from the Roman practice of taking the auspicium, or inspection of birds, before undertaking any important business.

Austro-Hungarian (a.) Of or pertaining to the monarchy composed of Austria and Hungary.

Authentic (n.) Having a genuine original or authority, in opposition to that which is false, fictitious, counterfeit, or apocryphal; being what it purports to be; genuine; not of doubtful origin; real; as, an authentic paper or register.

Authentic (n.) Having as immediate relation to the tonic, in distinction from plagal, which has a correspondent relation to the dominant in the octave below the tonic.

Authenticity (n.) The quality of being authentic or of established authority for truth and correctness.

Authenticity (n.) Genuineness; the quality of being genuine or not corrupted from the original.

Authentics (n.) A collection of the Novels or New Constitutions of Justinian, by an anonymous author; -- so called on account of its authenticity.

Author (n.) One who composes or writes a book; a composer, as distinguished from an editor, translator, or compiler.

Authoritative (a.) Having, or proceeding from, due authority; entitled to obedience, credit, or acceptance; determinate; commanding.

Authority (n.) Legal or rightful power; a right to command or to act; power exercised buy a person in virtue of his office or trust; dominion; jurisdiction; authorization; as, the authority of a prince over subjects, and of parents over children; the authority of a court.

Authority (n.) Government; the persons or the body exercising power or command; as, the local authorities of the States; the military authorities.

Authority (n.) A precedent; a decision of a court, an official declaration, or an opinion, saying, or statement worthy to be taken as a precedent.

Authority (n.) A book containing such a statement or opinion, or the author of the book.

Authorize (v. t.) To clothe with authority, warrant, or legal power; to give a right to act; to empower; as, to authorize commissioners to settle a boundary.

Authorize (v. t.) To sanction or confirm by the authority of some one; to warrant; as, to authorize a report.

Authotype (n.) A type or block containing a facsimile of an autograph.

Auto- () A combining form, with the meaning of self, one's self, one's own, itself, its own.

Autobiographical (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, autobiography; as, an autobiographical sketch.

Autocephalous (a.) Having its own head; independent of episcopal or patriarchal jurisdiction, as certain Greek churches.

Autochronograph (n.) An instrument for the instantaneous self-recording or printing of time.

Autochthon (n.) One who is supposed to rise or spring from the ground or the soil he inhabits; one of the original inhabitants or aborigines; a native; -- commonly in the plural. This title was assumed by the ancient Greeks, particularly the Athenians.

Autochthon (n.) That which is original to a particular country, or which had there its origin.

Autochthony (n.) An aboriginal or autochthonous condition.

Autocracy (n.) Independent or self-derived power; absolute or controlling authority; supremacy.

Autocracy (n.) Supreme, uncontrolled, unlimited authority, or right of governing in a single person, as of an autocrat.

Autocrat (a.) One who rules with undisputed sway in any company or relation; a despot.

Auto-da-fe (n.) A judgment of the Inquisition in Spain and Portugal condemning or acquitting persons accused of religious offenses.

Auto-da-fe (n.) A session of the court of Inquisition.

Automatical (a.) Pertaining to, or produced by, an automaton; of the nature of an automaton; self-acting or self-regulating under fixed conditions; -- esp. applied to machinery or devices in which certain things formerly or usually done by hand are done by the machine or device itself; as, the automatic feed of a lathe; automatic gas lighting; an automatic engine or switch; an automatic mouse.

Autonomasy (n.) The use of a word of common or general signification for the name of a particular thing; as, "He has gone to town," for, "He has gone to London."

Autonomy (n.) The sovereignty of reason in the sphere of morals; or man's power, as possessed of reason, to give law to himself. In this, according to Kant, consist the true nature and only possible proof of liberty.

Autophony (n.) An auscultatory process, which consists in noting the tone of the observer's own voice, while he speaks, holding his head close to the patient's chest.

Autoptical (a.) Seen with one's own eyes; belonging to, or connected with, personal observation; as, autoptic testimony or experience.

Autotypography (n.) A process resembling "nature printing," by which drawings executed on gelatin are impressed into a soft metal plate, from which the printing is done as from copperplate.

Autumn (n.) The third season of the year, or the season between summer and winter, often called "the fall." Astronomically, it begins in the northern temperate zone at the autumnal equinox, about September 23, and ends at the winter solstice, about December 23; but in popular language, autumn, in America, comprises September, October, and November.

Auxetic (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, auxesis; amplifying.

Auxiliary (n.) A helper; an assistant; a confederate in some action or enterprise.

Avail (v. i.) To be of use or advantage; to answer the purpose; to have strength, force, or efficacy sufficient to accomplish the object; as, the plea in bar must avail, that is, be sufficient to defeat the suit; this scheme will not avail; medicines will not avail to check the disease.

Avail (n.) Profit; advantage toward success; benefit; value; as, labor, without economy, is of little avail.

Available (a.) Such as one may avail one's self of; capable of being used for the accomplishment of a purpose; usable; profitable; advantageous; convertible into a resource; as, an available measure; an available candidate.

Avant-courier (n.) A person dispatched before another person or company, to give notice of his or their approach.

Avarice (n.) An excessive or inordinate desire of gain; greediness after wealth; covetousness; cupidity.

Avaunt (interj.) Begone; depart; -- a word of contempt or abhorrence, equivalent to the phrase "Get thee gone."

Avena (n.) A genus of grasses, including the common oat (Avena sativa); the oat grasses.

Aventurine (n.) A kind of glass, containing gold-colored spangles. It was produced in the first place by the accidental (par aventure) dropping of some brass filings into a pot of melted glass.

Aver (v. t.) To affirm with confidence; to declare in a positive manner, as in confidence of asserting the truth.

Average (n.) A contribution to a loss or charge which has been imposed upon one of several for the general benefit; damage done by sea perils.

Average (n.) Any medial estimate or general statement derived from a comparison of diverse specific cases; a medium or usual size, quantity, quality, rate, etc.

Average (n.) In the English corn trade, the medial price of the several kinds of grain in the principal corn markets.

Average (a.) Pertaining to an average or mean; medial; containing a mean proportion; of a mean size, quality, ability, etc.; ordinary; usual; as, an average rate of profit; an average amount of rain; the average Englishman; beings of the average stamp.

Average (a.) According to the laws of averages; as, the loss must be made good by average contribution.

Average (v. t.) To divide among a number, according to a given proportion; as, to average a loss.

Average (v. t.) To do, accomplish, get, etc., on an average.

Avercorn (n.) A reserved rent in corn, formerly paid to religious houses by their tenants or farmers.

Avernian (a.) Of or pertaining to Avernus, a lake of Campania, in Italy, famous for its poisonous vapors, which ancient writers fancied were so malignant as to kill birds flying over it. It was represented by the poets to be connected with the infernal regions.

Averruncator (n.) An instrument for pruning trees, consisting of two blades, or a blade and a hook, fixed on the end of a long rod.

Aviary (n.) A house, inclosure, large cage, or other place, for keeping birds confined; a bird house.

Avignon berry () The fruit of the Rhamnus infectorius, eand of other species of the same genus; -- so called from the city of Avignon, in France. It is used by dyers and painters for coloring yellow. Called also French berry.

Avise (v. t.) To advise; to counsel.

Avise (v. i.) To consider; to reflect.

Avoset (n.) A grallatorial bird, of the genus Recurvirostra; the scooper. The bill is long and bend upward toward the tip. The American species is R. Americana.

Avoid (a.) To keep away from; to keep clear of; to endeavor no to meet; to shun; to abstain from; as, to avoid the company of gamesters.

Avoid (a.) To defeat or evade; to invalidate. Thus, in a replication, the plaintiff may deny the defendant's plea, or confess it, and avoid it by stating new matter.

Avoid (v. i.) To become void or vacant.

Avoidance (n.) The act of becoming vacant, or the state of being vacant; -- specifically used for the state of a benefice becoming void by the death, deprivation, or resignation of the incumbent.

Avoidance (n.) The courts by which anything is carried off.

Avouch (v. t.) To acknowledge deliberately; to admit; to confess; to sanction.

Avowable (a.) Capable of being avowed, or openly acknowledged, with confidence.

Avulsion (n.) The sudden removal of lands or soil from the estate of one man to that of another by an inundation or a current, or by a sudden change in the course of a river by which a part of the estate of one man is cut off and joined to the estate of another. The property in the part thus separated, or cut off, continues in the original owner.

Awake (v. i.) To cease to sleep; to come out of a state of natural sleep; and, figuratively, out of a state resembling sleep, as inaction or death.

Awakening (a.) Rousing from sleep, in a natural or a figurative sense; rousing into activity; exciting; as, the awakening city; an awakening discourse; the awakening dawn.

Award (v. t.) To give by sentence or judicial determination; to assign or apportion, after careful regard to the nature of the case; to adjudge; as, the arbitrators awarded damages to the complainant.

Award (v. t.) The paper containing the decision of arbitrators; that which is warded.

Aware (a.) Apprised; informed; cognizant; conscious; as, he was aware of the enemy's designs.

Away (adv.) From a state or condition of being; out of existence.

Away (adv.) By ellipsis of the verb, equivalent to an imperative: Go or come away; begone; take away.

Away (adv.) On; in continuance; without intermission or delay; as, sing away.

Awe (v. t.) To strike with fear and reverence; to inspire with awe; to control by inspiring dread.

Awhape (v. t.) To confound; to terrify; to amaze.

Awk (a.) Wrong, or not commonly used; clumsy; sinister; as, the awk end of a rod (the but end).

Awning (n.) A rooflike cover, usually of canvas, extended over or before any place as a shelter from the sun, rain, or wind.

Awning (n.) That part of the poop deck which is continued forward beyond the bulkhead of the cabin.

Awry (adv. & a.) Turned or twisted toward one side; not in a straight or true direction, or position; out of the right course; distorted; obliquely; asquint; with oblique vision; as, to glance awry.

Axillars (n. pl.) Feathers connecting the under surface of the wing and the body, and concealed by the closed wing.

Axinite (n.) A borosilicate of alumina, iron, and lime, commonly found in glassy, brown crystals with acute edges.

Axiom (a.) An established principle in some art or science, which, though not a necessary truth, is universally received; as, the axioms of political economy.

Axis (n.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center.

Axis (n.) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata.

Axis (n.) The primary or secondary central line of any design.

Axle (n.) A transverse bar or shaft connecting the opposite wheels of a car or carriage; an axletree.

Axled (a.) Having an axle; -- used in composition.

Axletree (n.) A bar or beam of wood or iron, connecting the opposite wheels of a carriage, on the ends of which the wheels revolve.

Axolotl (n.) An amphibian of the salamander tribe found in the elevated lakes of Mexico; the siredon.

Ay (a.) Always; ever; continually; for an indefinite time.

Ayrshire (n.) One of a superior breed of cattle from Ayrshire, Scotland. Ayrshires are notable for the quantity and quality of their milk.

Ayuntamiento (n.) In Spain and Spanish America, a corporation or body of magistrates in cities and towns, corresponding to mayor and aldermen.

Azedarach (n.) A handsome Asiatic tree (Melia azedarach), common in the southern United States; -- called also, Pride of India, Pride of China, and Bead tree.

Azo- () A combining form of azote

Azo- () Applied loosely to compounds having nitrogen variously combined, as in cyanides, nitrates, etc.

Azo- () Now especially applied to compounds containing a two atom nitrogen group uniting two hydrocarbon radicals, as in azobenzene, azobenzoic, etc. These compounds furnish many artificial dyes. See Diazo-.

Azotic (a.) Pertaining to azote, or nitrogen; formed or consisting of azote; nitric; as, azotic gas; azotic acid.

Azotite (n.) A salt formed by the combination of azotous, or nitrous, acid with a base; a nitrite.

Aztec (a.) Of or relating to one of the early races in Mexico that inhabited the great plateau of that country at the time of the Spanish conquest in 1519.

Azure (a.) Sky-blue; resembling the clear blue color of the unclouded sky; cerulean; also, cloudless.

Azure (n.) The clear blue color of the sky; also, a pigment or dye of this color.

Azure (n.) A blue color, represented in engraving by horizontal parallel lines.

Azure (v. t.) To color blue.

Azured (a.) Of an azure color; sky-blue.

Azureous (a.) Of a fine blue color; azure.

Azurine (n.) The blue roach of Europe (Leuciscus caeruleus); -- so called from its color.

Azurite (n.) Blue carbonate of copper; blue malachite.

B () is the second letter of the English alphabet. (See Guide to Pronunciation, // 196, 220.) It is etymologically related to p, v, f, w and m , letters representing sounds having a close organic affinity to its own sound; as in Eng. bursar and purser; Eng. bear and Lat. ferre; Eng. silver and Ger. silber; Lat. cubitum and It. gomito; Eng. seven, Anglo-Saxon seofon, Ger. sieben, Lat. septem, Gr."epta`, Sanskrit saptan. The form of letter B is Roman, from Greek B (Beta), of Semitic origin. The small b was formed by gradual change from the capital B.

Babbitt metal () A soft white alloy of variable composition (as a nine parts of tin to one of copper, or of fifty parts of tin to five of antimony and one of copper) used in bearings to diminish friction.

Babble (v. i.) To talk incoherently; to utter unmeaning words.

Babble (v. i.) To make a continuous murmuring noise, as shallow water running over stones.

Babble (v. i.) To utter in an indistinct or incoherent way; to repeat, as words, in a childish way without understanding.

Babble (n.) Inarticulate speech; constant or confused murmur.

Babel (n.) The city and tower in the land of Shinar, where the confusion of languages took place.

Babel (n.) Hence: A place or scene of noise and confusion; a confused mixture of sounds, as of voices or languages.

Babingtonite (n.) A mineral occurring in triclinic crystals approaching pyroxene in angle, and of a greenish black color. It is a silicate of iron, manganese, and lime.

Bablah (n.) The ring of the fruit of several East Indian species of acacia; neb-neb. It contains gallic acid and tannin, and is used for dyeing drab.

Baccalaureate (n.) The degree of bachelor of arts. (B.A. or A.B.), the first or lowest academical degree conferred by universities and colleges.

Bacchius (n.) A metrical foot composed of a short syllable and two long ones; according to some, two long and a short.

Bachelor (n.) A person who has taken the first or lowest degree in the liberal arts, or in some branch of science, at a college or university; as, a bachelor of arts.

Bachelor (n.) In the companies of London tradesmen, one not yet admitted to wear the livery; a junior member.

Bachelorhood (n.) The state or condition of being a bachelor; bachelorship.

Bachelor's button () A plant with flowers shaped like buttons; especially, several species of Ranunculus, and the cornflower (Centaures cyanus) and globe amaranth (Gomphrena).

Bacillus (n.) A variety of bacterium; a microscopic, rod-shaped vegetable organism.

Back (n.) A large shallow vat; a cistern, tub, or trough, used by brewers, distillers, dyers, picklers, gluemakers, and others, for mixing or cooling wort, holding water, hot glue, etc.

Back (n.) In human beings, the hinder part of the body, extending from the neck to the end of the spine; in other animals, that part of the body which corresponds most nearly to such part of a human being; as, the back of a horse, fish, or lobster.

Back (v. i.) To support; to maintain; to second or strengthen by aid or influence; as, to back a friend.

Back (v. i.) To change from one quarter to another by a course opposite to that of the sun; -- used of the wind.

Back (adv.) To a former state, condition, or station; as, to go back to private life; to go back to barbarism.

Back (adv.) Away from contact; by reverse movement.

Back (adv.) In concealment or reserve; in one's own possession; as, to keep back the truth; to keep back part of the money due to another.

Backbond (n.) An instrument which, in conjunction with another making an absolute disposition, constitutes a trust.

Backbone (n.) The column of bones in the back which sustains and gives firmness to the frame; the spine; the vertebral or spinal column.

Backdoor (a.) Acting from behind and in concealment; as, backdoor intrigues.

Backdown (n.) A receding or giving up; a complete surrender.

Backed (a.) Having a back; fitted with a back; as, a backed electrotype or stereotype plate. Used in composition; as, broad-backed; hump-backed.

Backer (n.) One who, or that which, backs; especially one who backs a person or thing in a contest.

Backhanded (a.) Indirect; awkward; insincere; sarcastic; as, a backhanded compliment.

Backing (n.) The preparation of the back of a book with glue, etc., before putting on the cover.

Backlash (n.) The distance through which one part of connected machinery, as a wheel, piston, or screw, can be moved without moving the connected parts, resulting from looseness in fitting or from wear; also, the jarring or reflex motion caused in badly fitting machinery by irregularities in velocity or a reverse of motion.

Backplate (n.) A piece, or plate which forms the back of anything, or which covers the back; armor for the back.

Backset (n.) A check; a relapse; a discouragement; a setback.

Backset (n.) Whatever is thrown back in its course, as water.

Backsettler (n.) One living in the back or outlying districts of a community.

Backwards (adv.) In a contrary or reverse manner, way, or direction; contrarily; as, to read backwards.

Backward (a.) Not advanced in civilization; undeveloped; as, the country or region is in a backward state.

Backwardation (n.) The seller's postponement of delivery of stock or shares, with the consent of the buyer, upon payment of a premium to the latter; -- also, the premium so paid. See Contango.

Backwash (v. i.) To clean the oil from (wood) after combing.

Backwater (n.) Water turned back in its course by an obstruction, an opposing current , or the flow of the tide, as in a sewer or river channel, or across a river bar.

Bacon (n.) The back and sides of a pig salted and smoked; formerly, the flesh of a pig salted or fresh.

Baconian (a.) Of or pertaining to Lord Bacon, or to his system of philosophy.

Bacterioscopic (a.) Relating to bacterioscopy; as, a bacterioscopic examination.

Bacterioscopist (n.) One skilled in bacterioscopic examinations.

Bacterioscopy (n.) The application of a knowledge of bacteria for their detection and identification, as in the examination of polluted water.

Bacterium (n.) A microscopic vegetable organism, belonging to the class Algae, usually in the form of a jointed rodlike filament, and found in putrefying organic infusions. Bacteria are destitute of chlorophyll, and are the smallest of microscopic organisms. They are very widely diffused in nature, and multiply with marvelous rapidity, both by fission and by spores. Certain species are active agents in fermentation, while others appear to be the cause of certain infectious diseases. See Bacillus.

Baculite (n.) A cephalopod of the extinct genus Baculites, found fossil in the Cretaceous rocks. It is like an uncoiled ammonite.

Bad (superl.) Wanting good qualities, whether physical or moral; injurious, hurtful, inconvenient, offensive, painful, unfavorable, or defective, either physically or morally; evil; vicious; wicked; -- the opposite of good; as, a bad man; bad conduct; bad habits; bad soil; bad health; bad crop; bad news.

Badder () compar. of Bad, a.

Badge (n.) A distinctive mark, token, sign, or cognizance, worn on the person; as, the badge of a society; the badge of a policeman.

Badge (n.) A carved ornament on the stern of a vessel, containing a window or the representation of one.

Badger (n.) An itinerant licensed dealer in commodities used for food; a hawker; a huckster; -- formerly applied especially to one who bought grain in one place and sold it in another.

Badiaga (n.) A fresh-water sponge (Spongilla), common in the north of Europe, the powder of which is used to take away the livid marks of bruises.

Badigeon (n.) A cement or paste (as of plaster and freestone, or of sawdust and glue or lime) used by sculptors, builders, and workers in wood or stone, to fill holes, cover defects, or finish a surface.

Bad lands () Barren regions, especially in the western United States, where horizontal strata (Tertiary deposits) have been often eroded into fantastic forms, and much intersected by ca–ons, and where lack of wood, water, and forage increases the difficulty of traversing the country, whence the name, first given by the Canadian French, Mauvaises Terres (bad lands).

Badminton (n.) A game, similar to lawn tennis, played with shuttlecocks.

Baffle (v. t.) To check by perplexing; to disconcert, frustrate, or defeat; to thwart.

Baffle (n.) A defeat by artifice, shifts, and turns; discomfiture.

Baffling (a.) Frustrating; discomfiting; disconcerting; as, baffling currents, winds, tasks.

Bafta (n.) A coarse stuff, usually of cotton, originally made in India. Also, an imitation of this fabric made for export.

Bag (n.) A sac, or dependent gland, in animal bodies, containing some fluid or other substance; as, the bag of poison in the mouth of some serpents; the bag of a cow.

Bag (n.) A certain quantity of a commodity, such as it is customary to carry to market in a sack; as, a bag of pepper or hops; a bag of coffee.

Bag (v. i.) To swell or hang down like a full bag; as, the skin bags from containing morbid matter.

Bag (v. i.) To become pregnant.

Bagasse (n.) Sugar cane, as it comes crushed from the mill. It is then dried and used as fuel. Also extended to the refuse of beetroot sugar.

Bagman (n.) A commercial traveler; one employed to solicit orders for manufacturers and tradesmen.

Bagpipe (n.) A musical wind instrument, now used chiefly in the Highlands of Scotland.

Bague (n.) The annular molding or group of moldings dividing a long shaft or clustered column into two or more parts.

Baguette (n.) One of the minute bodies seen in the divided nucleoli of some Infusoria after conjugation.

Bagworm (n.) One of several lepidopterous insects which construct, in the larval state, a baglike case which they carry about for protection. One species (Platoeceticus Gloveri) feeds on the orange tree. See Basket worm.

Bah (interj.) An exclamation expressive of extreme contempt.

Bahar (n.) A weight used in certain parts of the East Indies, varying considerably in different localities, the range being from 223 to 625 pounds.

Bail (n.) A bucket or scoop used in bailing water out of a boat.

Bail (v. t.) To dip or lade water from; -- often with out to express completeness; as, to bail a boat.

Bail (v./t.) To deliver, as goods in trust, for some special object or purpose, upon a contract, expressed or implied, that the trust shall be faithfully executed on the part of the bailee, or person intrusted; as, to bail cloth to a tailor to be made into a garment; to bail goods to a carrier.

Bail (n.) The person or persons who procure the release of a prisoner from the custody of the officer, or from imprisonment, by becoming surely for his appearance in court.

Bail (n.) A half hoop for supporting the cover of a carrier's wagon, awning of a boat, etc.

Bail (n.) The outer wall of a feudal castle. Hence: The space inclosed by it; the outer court.

Bail bond () A bond or obligation given by a prisoner and his surety, to insure the prisoner's appearance in court, at the return of the writ.

Bail bond () Special bail in court to abide the judgment.

Bailee (n.) The person to whom goods are committed in trust, and who has a temporary possession and a qualified property in them, for the purposes of the trust.

Bailey (n.) A prison or court of justice; -- used in certain proper names; as, the Old Bailey in London; the New Bailey in Manchester.

Bailie (n.) An officer in Scotland, whose office formerly corresponded to that of sheriff, but now corresponds to that of an English alderman.

Bailiff (n.) Originally, a person put in charge of something especially, a chief officer, magistrate, or keeper, as of a county, town, hundred, or castle; one to whom power/ of custody or care are intrusted.

Bailiff (n.) A sheriff's deputy, appointed to make arrests, collect fines, summon juries, etc.

Bailiff (n.) An overseer or under steward of an estate, who directs husbandry operations, collects rents, etc.

Bailment (n.) A delivery of goods or money by one person to another in trust, for some special purpose, upon a contract, expressed or implied, that the trust shall be faithfully executed.

Bailpiece (n.) A piece of parchment, or paper, containing a recognizance or bail bond.

Bain-marie (n.) A vessel for holding hot water in which another vessel may be heated without scorching its contents; -- used for warming or preparing food or pharmaceutical preparations.

Baisemains (n. pl.) Respects; compliments.

Bait (v. t.) To furnish or cover with bait, as a trap or hook.

Baize (n.) A coarse woolen stuff with a long nap; -- usually dyed in plain colors.

Bajocco (n.) A small copper coin formerly current in the Roman States, worth about a cent and a half.

Bake (v. t.) To prepare, as food, by cooking in a dry heat, either in an oven or under coals, or on heated stone or metal; as, to bake bread, meat, apples.

Bake (v. t.) To harden by cold.

Bake (v. i.) To be baked; to become dry and hard in heat; as, the bread bakes; the ground bakes in the hot sun.

Baking (n.) The act or process of cooking in an oven, or of drying and hardening by heat or cold.

Balaam (n.) A paragraph describing something wonderful, used to fill out a newspaper column; -- an allusion to the miracle of Balaam's ass speaking.

Balachong (n.) A condiment formed of small fishes or shrimps, pounded up with salt and spices, and then dried. It is much esteemed in China.

Balance (n.) Act of weighing mentally; comparison; estimate.

Balance (n.) An equality between the sums total of the two sides of an account; as, to bring one's accounts to a balance; -- also, the excess on either side; as, the balance of an account.

Balance (n.) The constellation Libra.

Balance (n.) To equal in number, weight, force, or proportion; to counterpoise, counterbalance, counteract, or neutralize.

Balance (n.) To compare in relative force, importance, value, etc.; to estimate.

Balance (n.) To settle and adjust, as an account; to make two accounts equal by paying the difference between them.

Balance (n.) To make the sums of the debits and credits of an account equal; -- said of an item; as, this payment, or credit, balances the account.

Balance (n.) To arrange accounts in such a way that the sum total of the debits is equal to the sum total of the credits; as, to balance a set of books.

Balance (n.) To contract, as a sail, into a narrower compass; as, to balance the boom mainsail.

Balance (v. i.) To move toward a person or couple, and then back.

Balaniferous (a.) Bearing or producing acorns.

Balanoid (a.) Resembling an acorn; -- applied to a group of barnacles having shells shaped like acorns. See Acornshell, and Barnacle.

Balbuties (n.) The defect of stammering; also, a kind of incomplete pronunciation.

Balcon (n.) A balcony.

Balconied (a.) Having balconies.

Balconies (pl. ) of Balcony

Balcony (n.) A platform projecting from the wall of a building, usually resting on brackets or consoles, and inclosed by a parapet; as, a balcony in front of a window. Also, a projecting gallery in places of amusement; as, the balcony in a theater.

Balcony (n.) A projecting gallery once common at the stern of large ships.

Bald (a.) Destitute of the natural or common covering on the head or top, as of hair, feathers, foliage, trees, etc.; as, a bald head; a bald oak.

Bald (a.) Destitute of the natural covering.

Baldachin (n.) A structure in form of a canopy, sometimes supported by columns, and sometimes suspended from the roof or projecting from the wall; generally placed over an altar; as, the baldachin in St. Peter's.

Bald eagle () The white-headed eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) of America. The young, until several years old, lack the white feathers on the head.

Baldness (n.) The state or condition of being bald; as, baldness of the head; baldness of style.

Bale (n.) A bundle or package of goods in a cloth cover, and corded for storage or transportation; also, a bundle of straw / hay, etc., put up compactly for transportation.

Balearic (a.) Of or pertaining to the isles of Majorca, Minorca, Ivica, etc., in the Mediterranean Sea, off the coast of Valencia.

Balisaur (n.) A badgerlike animal of India (Arcionyx collaris).

Balize (n.) A pole or a frame raised as a sea beacon or a landmark.

Balk (v. i.) One of the beams connecting the successive supports of a trestle bridge or bateau bridge.

Balk (v. i.) To engage in contradiction; to be in opposition.

Balker (n.) A person who stands on a rock or eminence to espy the shoals of herring, etc., and to give notice to the men in boats which way they pass; a conder; a huer.

Ball (n.) Any solid spherical, cylindrical, or conical projectile of lead or iron, to be discharged from a firearm; as, a cannon ball; a rifle ball; -- often used collectively; as, powder and ball. Spherical balls for the smaller firearms are commonly called bullets.

Ball (n.) A flaming, roundish body shot into the air; a case filled with combustibles intended to burst and give light or set fire, or to produce smoke or stench; as, a fire ball; a stink ball.

Ball (n.) A leather-covered cushion, fastened to a handle called a ballstock; -- formerly used by printers for inking the form, but now superseded by the roller.

Ball (n.) A large pill, a form in which medicine is commonly given to horses; a bolus.

Ball (v. t.) To form or wind into a ball; as, to ball cotton.

Ballade (n.) A form of French versification, sometimes imitated in English, in which three or four rhymes recur through three stanzas of eight or ten lines each, the stanzas concluding with a refrain, and the whole poem with an envoy.

Ballast (a.) The larger solids, as broken stone or gravel, used in making concrete.

Ballet (n.) An artistic dance performed as a theatrical entertainment, or an interlude, by a number of persons, usually women. Sometimes, a scene accompanied by pantomime and dancing.

Ballet (n.) The company of persons who perform the ballet.

Ballet (n.) A light part song, or madrigal, with a fa la burden or chorus, -- most common with the Elizabethan madrigal composers.

Ballet (n.) A bearing in coats of arms, representing one or more balls, which are denominated bezants, plates, etc., according to color.

Balloon (n.) The outline inclosing words represented as coming from the mouth of a pictured figure.

Ballooning spider () A spider which has the habit of rising into the air. Many kinds ( esp. species of Lycosa) do this while young by ejecting threads of silk until the force of the wind upon them carries the spider aloft.

Balmoral (n.) A long woolen petticoat, worn immediately under the dress.

Balsa (n.) A raft or float, used principally on the Pacific coast of South America.

Balsam (n.) A resin containing more or less of an essential or volatile oil.

Balsamical (a.) Having the qualities of balsam; containing, or resembling, balsam; soft; mitigative; soothing; restorative.

Balsamous (a.) Having the quality of balsam; containing balsam.

Baltimore oriole () A common American bird (Icterus galbula), named after Lord Baltimore, because its colors (black and orange red) are like those of his coat of arms; -- called also golden robin.

Baluster (n.) A small column or pilaster, used as a support to the rail of an open parapet, to guard the side of a staircase, or the front of a gallery. See Balustrade.

Balustrade (n.) A row of balusters topped by a rail, serving as an open parapet, as along the edge of a balcony, terrace, bridge, staircase, or the eaves of a building.

Bambocciade (n.) A representation of a grotesque scene from common or rustic life.

Bamboo (n.) A plant of the family of grasses, and genus Bambusa, growing in tropical countries.

Bamboozle (v. t.) To deceive by trickery; to cajole by confusing the senses; to hoax; to mystify; to humbug.

Ban (n.) Notice of a proposed marriage, proclaimed in church. See Banns (the common spelling in this sense).

Banality (n.) Something commonplace, hackneyed, or trivial; the commonplace, in speech.

Bank (n.) A bench; a high seat, or seat of distinction or judgment; a tribunal or court.

Banco (n.) A bank, especially that of Venice.

Band (v. t.) A fillet, strap, or any narrow ligament with which a thing is encircled, or fastened, or by which a number of things are tied, bound together, or confined; a fetter.

Band (v. t.) A continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, as of carved foliage, of color, or of brickwork, etc.

Band (v. t.) That which serves as the means of union or connection between persons; a tie.

Band (v. t.) A linen collar or ruff worn in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Band (v. t.) A narrow strip of cloth or other material on any article of dress, to bind, strengthen, ornament, or complete it.

Band (v. t.) A company of persons united in any common design, especially a body of armed men.

Band (v. t.) To unite in a troop, company, or confederacy.

Band (v. i.) To confederate for some common purpose; to unite; to conspire together.

Bandage (n.) Something resembling a bandage; that which is bound over or round something to cover, strengthen, or compress it; a ligature.

Bandage (v. t.) To bind, dress, or cover, with a bandage; as, to bandage the eyes.

Bandana (n.) A species of silk or cotton handkerchief, having a uniformly dyed ground, usually of red or blue, with white or yellow figures of a circular, lozenge, or other simple form.

Bandana (n.) A style of calico printing, in which white or bright spots are produced upon cloth previously dyed of a uniform red or dark color, by discharging portions of the color by chemical means, while the rest of the cloth is under pressure.

Bandbox (n.) A light box of pasteboard or thin wood, usually cylindrical, for holding ruffs (the bands of the 17th century), collars, caps, bonnets, etc.

Bandlet (n.) A small band or fillet; any little band or flat molding, compassing a column, like a ring.

Bandicoot (n.) A species of very large rat (Mus giganteus), found in India and Ceylon. It does much injury to rice fields and gardens.

Bandicoot (n.) A ratlike marsupial animal (genus Perameles) of several species, found in Australia and Tasmania.

Bandmaster (n.) The conductor of a musical band.

Bandon (n.) Disposal; control; license.

Bandy (v. i.) To content, as at some game in which each strives to drive the ball his own way.

Bandy (a.) Bent; crooked; curved laterally, esp. with the convex side outward; as, a bandy leg.

Bane (n.) A disease in sheep, commonly termed the rot.

Bang (n.) The sound produced by a sudden concussion.

Bang (n.) The short, front hair combed down over the forehead, esp. when cut squarely across; a false front of hair similarly worn.

Bangle (n.) An ornamental circlet, of glass, gold, silver, or other material, worn by women in India and Africa, and in some other countries, upon the wrist or ankle; a ring bracelet.

Banish (v. t.) To condemn to exile, or compel to leave one's country, by authority of the ruling power.

Banish (v. t.) To drive away; to compel to depart; to dispel.

Bank (n.) The margin of a watercourse; the rising ground bordering a lake, river, or sea, or forming the edge of a cutting, or other hollow.

Bank (n.) The face of the coal at which miners are working.

Bank (n.) A deposit of ore or coal, worked by excavations above water level.

Bank (n.) The regular term of a court of law, or the full court sitting to hear arguments upon questions of law, as distinguished from a sitting at Nisi Prius, or a court held for jury trials. See Banc.

Bank (n.) An establishment for the custody, loan, exchange, or issue, of money, and for facilitating the transmission of funds by drafts or bills of exchange; an institution incorporated for performing one or more of such functions, or the stockholders (or their representatives, the directors), acting in their corporate capacity.

Bank (n.) A fund from deposits or contributions, to be used in transacting business; a joint stock or capital.

Bank (v. i.) To deposit money in a bank; to have an account with a banker.

Bank book () A book kept by a depositor, in which an officer of a bank enters the debits and credits of the depositor's account with the bank.

Banker (n.) One who conducts the business of banking; one who, individually, or as a member of a company, keeps an establishment for the deposit or loan of money, or for traffic in money, bills of exchange, etc.

Banker (n.) A vessel employed in the cod fishery on the banks of Newfoundland.

Bank note () A promissory note issued by a bank or banking company, payable to bearer on demand.

Bank note () Formerly, a promissory note made by a banker, or banking company, payable to a specified person at a fixed date; a bank bill. See Bank bill, 2.

Bankrupt (n.) A trader who becomes unable to pay his debts; an insolvent trader; popularly, any person who is unable to pay his debts; an insolvent person.

Bankrupt (n.) A person who, in accordance with the terms of a law relating to bankruptcy, has been judicially declared to be unable to meet his liabilities.

Bankrupt (a.) Being a bankrupt or in a condition of bankruptcy; unable to pay, or legally discharged from paying, one's debts; as, a bankrupt merchant.

Bankruptcy (n.) The act or process of becoming a bankrupt.

Banner (n.) A large piece of silk or other cloth, with a device or motto, extended on a crosspiece, and borne in a procession, or suspended in some conspicuous place.

Banneret (n.) Originally, a knight who led his vassals into the field under his own banner; -- commonly used as a title of rank.

Banneret (n.) A title of rank, conferred for heroic deeds, and hence, an order of knighthood; also, the person bearing such title or rank.

Bannock (n.) A kind of cake or bread, in shape flat and roundish, commonly made of oatmeal or barley meal and baked on an iron plate, or griddle; -- used in Scotland and the northern counties of England.

Banquet (n.) A feast; a sumptuous entertainment of eating and drinking; often, a complimentary or ceremonious feast, followed by speeches.

Banquet (n.) A dessert; a course of sweetmeats; a sweetmeat or sweetmeats.

Banshie (n.) A supernatural being supposed by the Irish and Scotch peasantry to warn a family of the speedy death of one of its members, by wailing or singing in a mournful voice under the windows of the house.

Bantingism (n.) A method of reducing corpulence by avoiding food containing much farinaceous, saccharine, or oily matter; -- so called from William Banting of London.

Bantling (n.) A young or small child; an infant. [Slightly contemptuous or depreciatory.]

Banyan (n.) A tree of the same genus as the common fig, and called the Indian fig (Ficus Indica), whose branches send shoots to the ground, which take root and become additional trunks, until it may be the tree covers some acres of ground and is able to shelter thousands of men.

Baptistry (n.) A part of a church containing a font and used for baptismal services.

Baptize (v. t.) To sanctify; to consecrate.

Bar (n.) The railing that incloses the place which counsel occupy in courts of justice. Hence, the phrase at the bar of the court signifies in open court.

Bar (n.) The place in court where prisoners are stationed for arraignment, trial, or sentence.

Bar (n.) The whole body of lawyers licensed in a court or district; the legal profession.

Bar (n.) A special plea constituting a sufficient answer to plaintiff's action.

Bar (n.) A barrier or counter, over which liquors and food are passed to customers; hence, the portion of the room behind the counter where liquors for sale are kept.

Bar (n.) A broad shaft, or band, or stripe; as, a bar of light; a bar of color.

Bar (n.) To restrict or confine, as if by a bar; to hinder; to obstruct; to prevent; to prohibit; as, to bar the entrance of evil; distance bars our intercourse; the statute bars my right; the right is barred by time; a release bars the plaintiff's recovery; -- sometimes with up.

Barb (n.) Paps, or little projections, of the mucous membrane, which mark the opening of the submaxillary glands under the tongue in horses and cattle. The name is mostly applied when the barbs are inflamed and swollen.

Barb (n.) One of the side branches of a feather, which collectively constitute the vane. See Feather.

Barb (n.) A southern name for the kingfishes of the eastern and southeastern coasts of the United States; -- also improperly called whiting.

Barbarism (n.) An uncivilized state or condition; rudeness of manners; ignorance of arts, learning, and literature; barbarousness.

Barbarism (n.) An offense against purity of style or language; any form of speech contrary to the pure idioms of a particular language. See Solecism.

Barbarize (v. i.) To become barbarous.

Barbarous (a.) Being in the state of a barbarian; uncivilized; rude; peopled with barbarians; as, a barbarous people; a barbarous country.

Barbary (n.) The countries on the north coast of Africa from Egypt to the Atlantic. Hence: A Barbary horse; a barb. [Obs.] Also, a kind of pigeon.

Barbastel (n.) A European bat (Barbastellus communis), with hairy lips.

Barbecue (n.) A floor, on which coffee beans are sun-dried.

Barbed (a.) Accoutered with defensive armor; -- said of a horse. See Barded ( which is the proper form.)

Barberry (n.) A shrub of the genus Berberis, common along roadsides and in neglected fields. B. vulgaris is the species best known; its oblong red berries are made into a preserve or sauce, and have been deemed efficacious in fluxes and fevers. The bark dyes a fine yellow, esp. the bark of the root.

Barbet (n.) A bird of the family Bucconidae, allied to the Cuckoos, having a large, conical beak swollen at the base, and bearded with five bunches of stiff bristles; the puff bird. It inhabits tropical America and Africa.

Barbiers (n.) A variety of paralysis, peculiar to India and the Malabar coast; -- considered by many to be the same as beriberi in chronic form.

Barbotine (n.) A paste of clay used in decorating coarse pottery in relief.

Barcarolle (n.) A piece of music composed in imitation of such a song.

Barcon (n.) A vessel for freight; -- used in Mediterranean.

Bard (n.) A professional poet and singer, as among the ancient Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men.

Barde (pl.) A thin slice of fat bacon used to cover any meat or game.

Bard (v. t.) To cover (meat or game) with a thin slice of fat bacon.

Barded (p.a.) Accoutered with defensive armor; -- said of a horse.

Bare (a.) Without clothes or covering; stripped of the usual covering; naked; as, his body is bare; the trees are bare.

Bare (a.) With head uncovered; bareheaded.

Bare (a.) Without anything to cover up or conceal one's thoughts or actions; open to view; exposed.

Bare (a.) Mere; alone; unaccompanied by anything else; as, a bare majority.

Bare (a.) To strip off the covering of; to make bare; as, to bare the breast.

Barebacked (a.) Having the back uncovered; as, a barebacked horse.

Barefaced (a.) With the face uncovered; not masked.

Barefaced (a.) Without concealment; undisguised. Hence: Shameless; audacious.

Barege (n.) A gauzelike fabric for ladies' dresses, veils, etc. of worsted, silk and worsted, or cotton and worsted.

Barehead (a. & adv.) Having the head uncovered; as, a bareheaded girl.

Barely (adv.) Without covering; nakedly.

Barely (adv.) Without concealment or disguise.

Barfish (n.) Same as Calico bass.

Bargain (n.) An agreement between parties concerning the sale of property; or a contract by which one party binds himself to transfer the right to some property for a consideration, and the other party binds himself to receive the property and pay the consideration.

Bargain (n.) To make a bargain; to make a contract for the exchange of property or services; -- followed by with and for; as, to bargain with a farmer for a cow.

Bargain (v. t.) To transfer for a consideration; to barter; to trade; as, to bargain one horse for another.

Bargainee (v. i.) The party to a contract who receives, or agrees to receive, the property sold.

Bargainor (n.) One who makes a bargain, or contracts with another; esp., one who sells, or contracts to sell, property to another.

Barge (n.) A pleasure boat; a vessel or boat of state, elegantly furnished and decorated.

Barge (n.) A large, roomy boat for the conveyance of passengers or goods; as, a ship's barge; a charcoal barge.

Bargecourse (n.) A part of the tiling which projects beyond the principal rafters, in buildings where there is a gable.

Barite (n.) Native sulphate of barium, a mineral occurring in transparent, colorless, white to yellow crystals (generally tabular), also in granular form, and in compact massive forms resembling marble. It has a high specific gravity, and hence is often called heavy spar. It is a common mineral in metallic veins.

Barium (n.) One of the elements, belonging to the alkaline earth group; a metal having a silver-white color, and melting at a very high temperature. It is difficult to obtain the pure metal, from the facility with which it becomes oxidized in the air. Atomic weight, 137. Symbol, Ba. Its oxide called baryta.

Bard (n.) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind.

Bark (v. t.) To abrade or rub off any outer covering from; as to bark one's heel.

Bark (v. t.) To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark; as, to bark the roof of a hut.

Bark beetle () A small beetle of many species (family Scolytidae), which in the larval state bores under or in the bark of trees, often doing great damage.

Barky (a.) Covered with, or containing, bark.

Barleybreak (n.) An ancient rural game, commonly played round stacks of barley, or other grain, in which some of the party attempt to catch others who run from a goal.

Barleycorn (n.) A grain or "corn" of barley.

Barleycorn (n.) Formerly , a measure of length, equal to the average length of a grain of barley; the third part of an inch.

Barmote (n.) A court held in Derbyshire, in England, for deciding controversies between miners.

Barn (n.) A covered building used chiefly for storing grain, hay, and other productions of a farm. In the United States a part of the barn is often used for stables.

Barocco (a.) See Baroque.

Barograph (n.) An instrument for recording automatically the variations of atmospheric pressure.

Barometrically (adv.) By means of a barometer, or according to barometric observations.

Barometrograph (n.) A form of barometer so constructed as to inscribe of itself upon paper a record of the variations of atmospheric pressure.

Baron (n.) A title or degree of nobility; originally, the possessor of a fief, who had feudal tenants under him; in modern times, in France and Germany, a nobleman next in rank below a count; in England, a nobleman of the lowest grade in the House of Lords, being next below a viscount.

Baronet (n.) A dignity or degree of honor next below a baron and above a knight, having precedency of all orders of knights except those of the Garter. It is the lowest degree of honor that is hereditary. The baronets are commoners.

Baronetage (n.) The collective body of baronets.

Barony (n.) In Ireland, a territorial division, corresponding nearly to the English hundred, and supposed to have been originally the district of a native chief. There are 252 of these baronies. In Scotland, an extensive freehold. It may be held by a commoner.

Baroscope (n.) Any instrument showing the changes in the weight of the atmosphere; also, less appropriately, any instrument that indicates -or foreshadows changes of the weather, as a deep vial of liquid holding in suspension some substance which rises and falls with atmospheric changes.

Baroscopic (a.) Alt. of Baroscopical

Baroscopical (a.) Pertaining to, or determined by, the baroscope.

Barrack (n.) A movable roof sliding on four posts, to cover hay, straw, etc.

Barracoon (n.) A slave warehouse, or an inclosure where slaves are quartered temporarily.

Barracuda (n.) Alt. of Barracouata

Barracouata (n.) A voracious pikelike, marine fish, of the genus Sphyraena, sometimes used as food.

Barracouata (n.) A large edible fresh-water fish of Australia and New Zealand (Thyrsites atun).

Barrage (n.) An artificial bar or obstruction placed in a river or water course to increase the depth of water; as, the barrages of the Nile.

Barranca (n.) A ravine caused by heavy rains or a watercourse.

Barratrous (/) Tainter with, or constituting, barratry.

Barratry (n.) The practice of exciting and encouraging lawsuits and quarrels.

Barratry (n.) A fraudulent breach of duty or willful act of known illegality on the part of a master of a ship, in his character of master, or of the mariners, to the injury of the owner of the ship or cargo, and without his consent. It includes every breach of trust committed with dishonest purpose, as by running away with the ship, sinking or deserting her, etc., or by embezzling the cargo.

Barred owl () A large American owl (Syrnium nebulosum); -- so called from the transverse bars of a dark brown color on the breast.

Barrel (n.) The quantity which constitutes a full barrel. This varies for different articles and also in different places for the same article, being regulated by custom or by law. A barrel of wine is 31/ gallons; a barrel of flour is 196 pounds.

Barrel (n.) A solid drum, or a hollow cylinder or case; as, the barrel of a windlass; the barrel of a watch, within which the spring is coiled.

Barrelled (a.) Having a barrel; -- used in composition; as, a double-barreled gun.

Barrenness (n.) The condition of being barren; sterility; unproductiveness.

Barricader (n.) One who constructs barricades.

Barrier (n.) A fortress or fortified town, on the frontier of a country, commanding an avenue of approach.

Barrigudo (n.) A large, dark-colored, South American monkey, of the genus Lagothrix, having a long prehensile tail.

Barrister (n.) Counselor at law; a counsel admitted to plead at the bar, and undertake the public trial of causes, as distinguished from an attorney or solicitor. See Attorney.

Barroom (n.) A room containing a bar or counter at which liquors are sold.

Barrowist (n.) A follower of Henry Barrowe, one of the founders of Independency or Congregationalism in England. Barrowe was executed for nonconformity in 1953.

Barse (n.) The common perch. See 1st Bass.

Barter (v. i.) To traffic or trade, by exchanging one commodity for another, in distinction from a sale and purchase, in which money is paid for the commodities transferred; to truck.

Barter (v. t.) To trade or exchange in the way of barter; to exchange (frequently for an unworthy consideration); to traffic; to truck; -- sometimes followed by away; as, to barter away goods or honor.

Barter (n.) The act or practice of trafficking by exchange of commodities; an exchange of goods.

Baryto-calcite (n.) A mineral of a white or gray color, occurring massive or crystallized. It is a compound of the carbonates of barium and calcium.

Baritone (n.) A male voice, the compass of which partakes of the common bass and the tenor, but which does not descend as low as the one, nor rise as high as the other.

Basalt (n.) A rock of igneous origin, consisting of augite and triclinic feldspar, with grains of magnetic or titanic iron, and also bottle-green particles of olivine frequently disseminated.

Basaltic (a.) Pertaining to basalt; formed of, or containing, basalt; as basaltic lava.

Basaltiform (a.) In the form of basalt; columnar.

Basanite (n.) Lydian stone, or black jasper, a variety of siliceous or flinty slate, of a grayish or bluish black color. It is employed to test the purity of gold, the amount of alloy being indicated by the color left on the stone when rubbed by the metal.

Base (a.) Of little comparative value, as metal inferior to gold and silver, the precious metals.

Base (a.) Alloyed with inferior metal; debased; as, base coin; base bullion.

Base (a.) Not classical or correct.

Base (n.) The bottom of anything, considered as its support, or that on which something rests for support; the foundation; as, the base of a statue.

Base (n.) The lower part of a wall, pier, or column, when treated as a separate feature, usually in projection, or especially ornamented.

Base (n.) The lower part of a complete architectural design, as of a monument; also, the lower part of any elaborate piece of furniture or decoration.

Base (n.) The positive, or non-acid component of a salt; a substance which, combined with an acid, neutralizes the latter and forms a salt; -- applied also to the hydroxides of the positive elements or radicals, and to certain organic bodies resembling them in their property of forming salts with acids.

Base (n.) The chief ingredient in a compound.

Base (n.) The exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which connects the salient angles of two adjacent bastions.

Base (n.) The line or surface constituting that part of a figure on which it is supposed to stand.

Base (n.) The number from which a mathematical table is constructed; as, the base of a system of logarithms.

Base (n.) A place or tract of country, protected by fortifications, or by natural advantages, from which the operations of an army proceed, forward movements are made, supplies are furnished, etc.

Base (n.) The lower part of a robe or petticoat.

Base (n.) A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.

Base (n.) To put on a base or basis; to lay the foundation of; to found, as an argument or conclusion; -- used with on or upon.

Base-burner (n.) A furnace or stove in which the fuel is contained in a hopper or chamber, and is fed to the fire as the lower stratum is consumed.

Base-court (n.) The secondary, inferior, or rear courtyard of a large house; the outer court of a castle.

Base-court (n.) An inferior court of law, not of record.

Basement (a.) The outer wall of the ground story of a building, or of a part of that story, when treated as a distinct substructure. ( See Base, n., 3 (a).) Hence: The rooms of a ground floor, collectively.

Baseness (n.) The quality or condition of being base; degradation; vileness.

Bash (v. t. & i.) To abash; to disconcert or be disconcerted or put out of countenance.

Bashful (a.) Very modest, or modest excess; constitutionally disposed to shrink from public notice; indicating extreme or excessive modesty; shy; as, a bashful person, action, expression.

Basi- () A combining form, especially in anatomical and botanical words, to indicate the base or position at or near a base; forming a base; as, basibranchials, the most ventral of the cartilages or bones of the branchial arches; basicranial, situated at the base of the cranium; basifacial, basitemporal, etc.

Basic (a.) Said of crystalline rocks which contain a relatively low percentage of silica, as basalt.

Basicerite (n.) The second joint of the antennae of crustaceans.

Basicity (n.) The power of an acid to unite with one or more atoms or equivalents of a base, as indicated by the number of replaceable hydrogen atoms contained in the acid.

Basidium (n.) A special oblong or pyriform cell, with slender branches, which bears the spores in that division of fungi called Basidiomycetes, of which the common mushroom is an example.

Basifier (n.) That which converts into a salifiable base.

Basify (v. t.) To convert into a salifiable base.

Basil (n.) The name given to several aromatic herbs of the Mint family, but chiefly to the common or sweet basil (Ocymum basilicum), and the bush basil, or lesser basil (O. minimum), the leaves of which are used in cookery. The name is also given to several kinds of mountain mint (Pycnanthemum).

Basilical (a.) Pertaining to certain parts, anciently supposed to have a specially important function in the animal economy, as the middle vein of the right arm.

Basilica (n.) A building used by the Romans as a place of public meeting, with court rooms, etc., attached.

Basilicok (n.) The basilisk.

Basilicon (n.) An ointment composed of wax, pitch, resin, and olive oil, lard, or other fatty substance.

Basin (n.) The quantity contained in a basin.

Basin (n.) A hollow vessel, of various forms and materials, used in the arts or manufactures, as that used by glass grinders for forming concave glasses, by hatters for molding a hat into shape, etc.

Basin (n.) A hollow place containing water, as a pond, a dock for ships, a little bay.

Basin (n.) The entire tract of country drained by a river, or sloping towards a sea or lake.

Basin (n.) An isolated or circumscribed formation, particularly where the strata dip inward, on all sides, toward a center; -- especially applied to the coal formations, called coal basins or coal fields.

Basis (n.) The pedestal of a column, pillar, or statue.

Basis (n.) The principal component part of a thing.

Basisphenoidal (a.) Of or pertaining to that part of the base of the cranium between the basioccipital and the presphenoid, which usually ossifies separately in the embryo or in the young, and becomes a part of the sphenoid in the adult.

Bask (v. t.) To warm by continued exposure to heat; to warm with genial heat.

Basket (n.) The contents of a basket; as much as a basket contains; as, a basket of peaches.

Basket (n.) The two back seats facing one another on the outside of a stagecoach.

Basketful (n.) As much as a basket will contain.

Basketry (n.) The art of making baskets; also, baskets, taken collectively.

Basommatophora (n. pl.) A group of Pulmonifera having the eyes at the base of the tentacles, including the common pond snails.

Basquish (a.) Pertaining to the country, people, or language of Biscay; Basque

Bass (a.) The lowest part in a musical composition.

Basset (v. i.) To inclined upward so as to appear at the surface; to crop out; as, a vein of coal bassets.

Basset horn (a.) An instrument blown with a reed, and resembling a clarinet, but of much greater compass, embracing nearly four octaves.

Bassinet (n.) A wicker basket, with a covering or hood over one end, in which young children are placed as in a cradle.

Basso (a.) The double bass, or contrabasso.

Bassorin (n.) A constituent part of a species of gum from Bassora, as also of gum tragacanth and some gum resins. It is one of the amyloses.

Bast (n.) The inner fibrous bark of various plants; esp. of the lime tree; hence, matting, cordage, etc., made therefrom.

Bastardly (a.) Bastardlike; baseborn; spurious; corrupt.

Bastinado (n.) A sound beating with a stick or cudgel. Specifically: A form of punishment among the Turks, Chinese, and others, consisting in beating an offender on the soles of his feet.

Bastion (n.) A work projecting outward from the main inclosure of a fortification, consisting of two faces and two flanks, and so constructed that it is able to defend by a flanking fire the adjacent curtain, or wall which extends from one bastion to another. Two adjacent bastions are connected by the curtain, which joins the flank of one with the adjacent flank of the other. The distance between the flanks of a bastion is called the gorge. A lunette is a detached bastion. See Ravelin.

Baston (n.) An officer bearing a painted staff, who formerly was in attendance upon the king's court to take into custody persons committed by the court.

Basyle (n.) A positive or nonacid constituent of compound, either elementary, or, if compound, performing the functions of an element.

Bat (n.) A sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting.

Bat (n.) One of the Cheiroptera, an order of flying mammals, in which the wings are formed by a membrane stretched between the elongated fingers, legs, and tail. The common bats are small and insectivorous. See Cheiroptera and Vampire.

Batardeau (n.) A cofferdam.

Batch (v. t.) A quantity of anything produced at one operation; a group or collection of persons or things of the same kind; as, a batch of letters; the next batch of business.

Bate (n.) Strife; contention.

Bate (n.) An alkaline solution consisting of the dung of certain animals; -- employed in the preparation of hides; grainer.

Bateful (a.) Exciting contention; contentious.

Batfish (n.) A name given to several species of fishes: (a) The Malthe vespertilio of the Atlantic coast. (b) The flying gurnard of the Atlantic (Cephalacanthus spinarella). (c) The California batfish or sting ray (Myliobatis Californicus.)

Bath (n.) The act of exposing the body, or part of the body, for purposes of cleanliness, comfort, health, etc., to water, vapor, hot air, or the like; as, a cold or a hot bath; a medicated bath; a steam bath; a hip bath.

Bath (n.) A building containing an apartment or a series of apartments arranged for bathing.

Bath (n.) A Hebrew measure containing the tenth of a homer, or five gallons and three pints, as a measure for liquids; and two pecks and five quarts, as a dry measure.

Bathe (v. i.) To immerse or cover one's self, as in a bath.

Bathybius (n.) A name given by Prof. Huxley to a gelatinous substance found in mud dredged from the Atlantic and preserved in alcohol. He supposed that it was free living protoplasm, covering a large part of the ocean bed. It is now known that the substance is of chemical, not of organic, origin.

Batiste (n.) Originally, cambric or lawn of fine linen; now applied also to cloth of similar texture made of cotton.

Batman (n.) A weight used in the East, varying according to the locality; in Turkey, the greater batman is about 157 pounds, the lesser only a fourth of this; at Aleppo and Smyrna, the batman is 17 pounds.

Baton (n.) A staff or truncheon, used for various purposes; as, the baton of a field marshal; the baton of a conductor in musical performances.

Baton (n.) An ordinary with its ends cut off, borne sinister as a mark of bastardy, and containing one fourth in breadth of the bend sinister; -- called also bastard bar. See Bend sinister.

Batta (n.) Rate of exchange; also, the discount on uncurrent coins.

Battailant (v. i.) Prepared for battle; combatant; warlike.

Battailant (n.) A combatant.

Battalion (n.) A regiment, or two or more companies of a regiment, esp. when assembled for drill or battle.

Battel (n.) A single combat; as, trial by battel. See Wager of battel, under Wager.

Batten (n .) A strip of sawed stuff, or a scantling; as, (a) pl. (Com. & Arch.) Sawed timbers about 7 by 2 1/2 inches and not less than 6 feet long. Brande & C. (b) (Naut.) A strip of wood used in fastening the edges of a tarpaulin to the deck, also around masts to prevent chafing. (c) A long, thin strip used to strengthen a part, to cover a crack, etc.

Batter (v. t.) To flatten (metal) by hammering, so as to compress it inwardly and spread it outwardly.

Batter (v. t.) A semi-liquid mixture of several ingredients, as, flour, eggs, milk, etc., beaten together and used in cookery.

Battery (v. t.) A company or division of artillery, including the gunners, guns, horses, and all equipments. In the United States, a battery of flying artillery consists usually of six guns.

Battery (v. t.) A number of coated jars (Leyden jars) so connected that they may be charged and discharged simultaneously.

Battery (v. t.) A number of similar machines or devices in position; an apparatus consisting of a set of similar parts; as, a battery of boilers, of retorts, condensers, etc.

Battery (v. t.) A series of stamps operated by one motive power, for crushing ores containing the precious metals.

Batting (n.) Cotton in sheets, prepared for use in making quilts, etc.; as, cotton batting.

Battle (v. t.) A general action, fight, or encounter, in which all the divisions of an army are or may be engaged; an engagement; a combat.

Battle (v. t.) A struggle; a contest; as, the battle of life.

Battle (n.) To join in battle; to contend in fight; as, to battle over theories.

Battledoor (n.) An instrument, with a handle and a flat part covered with parchment or crossed with catgut, used to strike a shuttlecock in play; also, the play of battledoor and shuttlecock.

Battlement (n.) pl. The whole parapet, consisting of alternate solids and open spaces. At first purely a military feature, afterwards copied on a smaller scale with decorative features, as for churches.

Batz (n.) A small copper coin, with a mixture of silver, formerly current in some parts of Germany and Switzerland. It was worth about four cents.

Bavin (n.) A fagot of brushwood, or other light combustible matter, for kindling fires; refuse of brushwood.

Bawbling (a.) Insignificant; contemptible.

Bawcock (n.) A fine fellow; -- a term of endearment.

Bawdry (n.) Illicit intercourse; fornication.

Bay (a.) Reddish brown; of the color of a chestnut; -- applied to the color of horses.

Bay (n.) A small body of water set off from the main body; as a compartment containing water for a wheel; the portion of a canal just outside of the gates of a lock, etc.

Bay (n.) A principal compartment of the walls, roof, or other part of a building, or of the whole building, as marked off by the buttresses, vaulting, mullions of a window, etc.; one of the main divisions of any structure, as the part of a bridge between two piers.

Bay (n.) A compartment in a barn, for depositing hay, or grain in the stalks.

Bay (n.) The laurel tree (Laurus nobilis). Hence, in the plural, an honorary garland or crown bestowed as a prize for victory or excellence, anciently made or consisting of branches of the laurel.

Bay (n.) A tract covered with bay trees.

Bay (v. i.) A state of being obliged to face an antagonist or a difficulty, when escape has become impossible.

Bay-antler (n.) The second tine of a stag's horn. See under Antler.

Bayonet (v. t.) To compel or drive by the bayonet.

Bayou (n.) An inlet from the Gulf of Mexico, from a lake, or from a large river, sometimes sluggish, sometimes without perceptible movement except from tide and wind.

Bay rum () A fragrant liquid, used for cosmetic and medicinal purposes.

Bay salt () Salt which has been obtained from sea water, by evaporation in shallow pits or basins, by the heat of the sun; the large crystalline salt of commerce.

Bay window () A window forming a bay or recess in a room, and projecting outward from the wall, either in a rectangular, polygonal, or semicircular form; -- often corruptly called a bow window.

Bazar (n.) A fair for the sale of fancy wares, toys, etc., commonly for a charitable objects.

Bdellium (n.) A gum resin of reddish brown color, brought from India, Persia, and Africa.

Bdellomorpha (n.) An order of Nemertina, including the large leechlike worms (Malacobdella) often parasitic in clams.

Beach (n.) Pebbles, collectively; shingle.

Beach comber () A long, curling wave rolling in from the ocean. See Comber.

Beacon (n.) A signal fire to notify of the approach of an enemy, or to give any notice, commonly of warning.

Beacon (n.) A signal or conspicuous mark erected on an eminence near the shore, or moored in shoal water, as a guide to mariners.

Beacon (n.) A high hill near the shore.

Beacon (n.) That which gives notice of danger.

Beaconed (imp. & p. p.) of Beacon

Beaconing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Beacon

Beacon (v. t.) To give light to, as a beacon; to light up; to illumine.

Beacon (v. t.) To furnish with a beacon or beacons.

Beaconage (n.) Money paid for the maintenance of a beacon; also, beacons, collectively.

Beaconless (a.) Having no beacon.

Bead (n.) A little perforated ball, to be strung on a thread, and worn for ornament; or used in a rosary for counting prayers, as by Roman Catholics and Mohammedans, whence the phrases to tell beads, to at one's beads, to bid beads, etc., meaning, to be at prayer.

Bead (n.) A small molding of rounded surface, the section being usually an arc of a circle. It may be continuous, or broken into short embossments.

Bead (n.) A glassy drop of molten flux, as borax or microcosmic salt, used as a solvent and color test for several mineral earths and oxides, as of iron, manganese, etc., before the blowpipe; as, the borax bead; the iron bead, etc.

Beadle (v.) A messenger or crier of a court; a servitor; one who cites or bids persons to appear and answer; -- called also an apparitor or summoner.

Bead proof () Among distillers, a certain degree of strength in alcoholic liquor, as formerly ascertained by the floating or sinking of glass globules of different specific gravities thrown into it; now ascertained by more accurate meters.

Bead proof () A degree of strength in alcoholic liquor as shown by beads or small bubbles remaining on its surface, or at the side of the glass, when shaken.

Beadroll (n.) A catalogue of persons, for the rest of whose souls a certain number of prayers are to be said or counted off on the beads of a chaplet; hence, a catalogue in general.

Beagle (n.) Fig.: A spy or detective; a constable.

Beak (n.) The bill or nib of a bird, consisting of a horny sheath, covering the jaws. The form varied much according to the food and habits of the bird, and is largely used in the classification of birds.

Beak (n.) The prolongation of certain univalve shells containing the canal.

Beak (n.) A continuous slight projection ending in an arris or narrow fillet; that part of a drip from which the water is thrown off.

Beakhead (n.) A small platform at the fore part of the upper deck of a vessel, which contains the water closets of the crew.

Beal (v. i.) To gather matter; to swell and come to a head, as a pimple.

Beam (n.) The main part of a plow, to which the handles and colter are secured, and to the end of which are attached the oxen or horses that draw it.

Beam (n.) A heavy iron lever having an oscillating motion on a central axis, one end of which is connected with the piston rod from which it receives motion, and the other with the crank of the wheel shaft; -- called also working beam or walking beam.

Beam (n.) A ray or collection of parallel rays emitted from the sun or other luminous body; as, a beam of light, or of heat.

Beam (n.) Fig.: A ray; a gleam; as, a beam of comfort.

Beambird (n.) A small European flycatcher (Muscicapa gricola), so called because it often nests on a beam in a building.

Bean caper () A deciduous plant of warm climates, generally with fleshy leaves and flowers of a yellow or whitish yellow color, of the genus Zygophyllum.

Bear (v. t.) To support and remove or carry; to convey.

Bear (v. t.) To conduct; to bring; -- said of persons.

Bear (v. t.) To behave; to conduct.

Bear (v. i.) To be situated, as to the point of compass, with respect to something else; as, the land bears N. by E.

Bear (n.) One of two constellations in the northern hemisphere, called respectively the Great Bear and the Lesser Bear, or Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.

Bear (n.) Metaphorically: A brutal, coarse, or morose person.

Bear (n.) A block covered with coarse matting; -- used to scour the deck.

Bere (n.) Barley; the six-rowed barley or the four-rowed barley, commonly the former (Hord. vulgare).

Beard (v. t.) To take by the beard; to seize, pluck, or pull the beard of (a man), in anger or contempt.

Bearing (n.) The manner in which one bears or conducts one's self; mien; behavior; carriage.

Bearing (n.) Patient endurance; suffering without complaint.

Bearing (n.) The situation of one object, with respect to another, such situation being supposed to have a connection with the object, or influence upon it, or to be influenced by it; hence, relation; connection.

Bearing (n.) The part of an axle or shaft in contact with its support, collar, or boxing; the journal.

Bearing (n.) Any single emblem or charge in an escutcheon or coat of arms -- commonly in the pl.

Bearing (n.) The situation of a distant object, with regard to a ship's position, as on the bow, on the lee quarter, etc.; the direction or point of the compass in which an object is seen; as, the bearing of the cape was W. N. W.

Bearing cloth () A cloth with which a child is covered when carried to be baptized.

Bear's-breech (n.) The English cow parsnip (Heracleum sphondylium)

Bearskin (n.) A coarse, shaggy, woolen cloth for overcoats.

Beast (n.) Fig.: A coarse, brutal, filthy, or degraded fellow.

Beastly (a.) Characterizing the nature of a beast; contrary to the nature and dignity of man; brutal; filthy.

Beat (v. t.) To scour or range over in hunting, accompanied with the noise made by striking bushes, etc., for the purpose of rousing game.

Beat (v. t.) To overcome in a battle, contest, strife, race, game, etc.; to vanquish or conquer; to surpass.

Beat (v. i.) To come or act with violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike anything, as, rain, wind, and waves do.

Beat (v. i.) A round or course which is frequently gone over; as, a watchman's beat.

Beaten (a.) Vanquished; conquered; baffled.

Beaten (a.) Become common or trite; as, a beaten phrase.

Beatifical (a.) Having the power to impart or complete blissful enjoyment; blissful.

Beatification (n.) The act of beatifying, or the state of being beatified; esp., in the R. C. Church, the act or process of ascertaining and declaring that a deceased person is one of "the blessed," or has attained the second degree of sanctity, -- usually a stage in the process of canonization.

Beatify (v. t.) To pronounce or regard as happy, or supremely blessed, or as conferring happiness.

Beatify (v. t.) To make happy; to bless with the completion of celestial enjoyment.

Beatitude (n.) Felicity of the highest kind; consummate bliss.

Beau (n.) A man who escorts, or pays attentions to, a lady; an escort; a lover.

Beau ideal () A conception or image of consummate beauty, moral or physical, formed in the mind, free from all the deformities, defects, and blemishes seen in actual existence; an ideal or faultless standard or model.

Beaupere (n.) A companion.

Beautiful (a.) Having the qualities which constitute beauty; pleasing to the sight or the mind.

Beautify (v. i.) To become beautiful; to advance in beauty.

Beaver (n.) Beaver cloth, a heavy felted woolen cloth, used chiefly for making overcoats.

Beaver (n.) That piece of armor which protected the lower part of the face, whether forming a part of the helmet or fixed to the breastplate. It was so constructed (with joints or otherwise) that the wearer could raise or lower it to eat and drink.

Beaverteen (n.) A kind of fustian made of coarse twilled cotton, shorn after dyeing.

Became () imp. of Become.

Because (conj.) By or for the cause that; on this account that; for the reason that.

Because (conj.) In order that; that.

Beccaficos (pl. ) of Beccafico

Beccafico (n.) A small bird. (Silvia hortensis), which is highly prized by the Italians for the delicacy of its flesh in the autumn, when it has fed on figs, grapes, etc.

Bechic () Pertaining to, or relieving, a cough.

Bechic (n.) A medicine for relieving coughs.

Beck (v. t.) To notify or call by a nod, or a motion of the head or hand; to intimate a command to.

Beck (n.) A significant nod, or motion of the head or hand, esp. as a call or command.

Became (imp.) of Become

Become (p. p.) of Become

Becoming (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Become

Become (v. i.) To pass from one state to another; to enter into some state or condition, by a change from another state, or by assuming or receiving new properties or qualities, additional matter, or a new character.

Become (v. i.) To come; to get.

Become (v. t.) To suit or be suitable to; to be congruous with; to befit; to accord with, in character or circumstances; to be worthy of, or proper for; to cause to appear well; -- said of persons and things.

Becomed (a.) Proper; decorous.

Becoming (a.) Appropriate or fit; congruous; suitable; graceful; befitting.

Becoming (n.) That which is becoming or appropriate.

Becomingly (adv.) In a becoming manner.

Becomingness (n.) The quality of being becoming, appropriate, or fit; congruity; fitness.

Bed (n.) An article of furniture to sleep or take rest in or on; a couch. Specifically: A sack or mattress, filled with some soft material, in distinction from the bedstead on which it is placed (as, a feather bed), or this with the bedclothes added. In a general sense, any thing or place used for sleeping or reclining on or in, as a quantity of hay, straw, leaves, or twigs.

Bed (n.) A mass or heap of anything arranged like a bed; as, a bed of ashes or coals.

Bed (n.) The bottom of a watercourse, or of any body of water; as, the bed of a river.

Bed (n.) A layer or seam, or a horizontal stratum between layers; as, a bed of coal, iron, etc.

Bed (n.) A course of stone or brick in a wall.

Bed (v. t.) To make partaker of one's bed; to cohabit with.

Bed (v. t.) To plant or arrange in beds; to set, or cover, as in a bed of soft earth; as, to bed the roots of a plant in mold.

Bed (v. i.) To go to bed; to cohabit.

Bedclothes (n. pl.) Blankets, sheets, coverlets, etc., for a bed.

Bedcord (n.) A cord or rope interwoven in a bedstead so as to support the bed.

Bedevil (v. t.) To throw into utter disorder and confusion, as if by the agency of evil spirits; to bring under diabolical influence; to torment.

Bedevil (v. t.) To spoil; to corrupt.

Bedevilment (n.) The state of being bedeviled; bewildering confusion; vexatious trouble.

Bedfellow (n.) One who lies with another in the same bed; a person who shares one's couch.

Bedlam (n.) A place appropriated to the confinement and care of the insane; a madhouse.

Bedlam (n.) Any place where uproar and confusion prevail.

Bed-moulding (n.) The molding of a cornice immediately below the corona.

Bedpan (n.) A shallow chamber vessel, so constructed that it can be used by a sick person in bed.

Bedquilt (n.) A quilt for a bed; a coverlet.

Bedspread (n.) A bedquilt; a counterpane; a coverlet.

Bedung (v. t.) To cover with dung, as for manuring; to bedaub or defile, literally or figuratively.

Bedust (v. t.) To sprinkle, soil, or cover with dust.

Beebread (n.) A brown, bitter substance found in some of the cells of honeycomb. It is made chiefly from the pollen of flowers, which is collected by bees as food for their young.

Bee-eater (n.) A bird of the genus Merops, that feeds on bees. The European species (M. apiaster) is remarkable for its brilliant colors.

Beef (n.) An animal of the genus Bos, especially the common species, B. taurus, including the bull, cow, and ox, in their full grown state; esp., an ox or cow fattened for food.

Beef (n.) The flesh of an ox, or cow, or of any adult bovine animal, when slaughtered for food.

Beef (n.) Applied colloquially to human flesh.

Beefwood (n.) An Australian tree (Casuarina), and its red wood, used for cabinetwork; also, the trees Stenocarpus salignus of New South Wales, and Banksia compar of Queensland.

Beer (n.) A fermented liquor made from any malted grain, but commonly from barley malt, with hops or some other substance to impart a bitter flavor.

Beeriness (n.) Beery condition.

Beeswax (n.) The wax secreted by bees, and of which their cells are constructed.

Beeswing (n.) The second crust formed in port and some other wines after long keeping. It consists of pure, shining scales of tartar, supposed to resemble the wing of a bee.

Beet (n.) A biennial plant of the genus Beta, which produces an edible root the first year and seed the second year.

Beetle (v. t.) A machine in which fabrics are subjected to a hammering process while passing over rollers, as in cotton mills; -- called also beetling machine.

Beetle (v. t.) To finish by subjecting to a hammering process in a beetle or beetling machine; as, to beetle cotton goods.

Beetle (v. t.) Any insect of the order Coleoptera, having four wings, the outer pair being stiff cases for covering the others when they are folded up. See Coleoptera.

Beetrave (n.) The common beet (Beta vulgaris).

Befall (v. i.) To come to pass; to happen.

Befit (v. t.) To be suitable to; to suit; to become.

Befitting (a.) Suitable; proper; becoming; fitting.

Befog (v. t.) Hence: To confuse; to mystify.

Before (prep.) Under the cognizance or jurisdiction of.

Beforehand (a.) In comfortable circumstances as regards property; forehanded.

Befriend (v. t.) To act as a friend to; to favor; to aid, benefit, or countenance.

Befuddle (v. t.) To becloud and confuse, as with liquor.

Beget (v. t.) To procreate, as a father or sire; to generate; -- commonly said of the father.

Beggar (n.) One who is dependent upon others for support; -- a contemptuous or sarcastic use.

Beggarhood (n.) The condition of being a beggar; also, the class of beggars.

Beggarly (a.) In the condition of, or like, a beggar; suitable for a beggar; extremely indigent; poverty-stricken; mean; poor; contemptible.

Begin (v. i.) To have or commence an independent or first existence; to take rise; to commence.

Begin (v. i.) To do the first act or the first part of an action; to enter upon or commence something new, as a new form or state of being, or course of action; to take the first step; to start.

Begin (v. t.) To enter on; to commence.

Beginning (n.) The act of doing that which begins anything; commencement of an action, state, or space of time; entrance into being or upon a course; the first act, effort, or state of a succession of acts or states.

Begird (v. t.) To surround as with a band; to encompass.

Begirt (v. t.) To encompass; to begird.

Begnaw (v. t.) To gnaw; to eat away; to corrode.

Begonia (n.) A genus of plants, mostly of tropical America, many species of which are grown as ornamental plants. The leaves are curiously one-sided, and often exhibit brilliant colors.

Beguinage (n.) A collection of small houses surrounded by a wall and occupied by a community of Beguines.

Beguine (n.) A woman belonging to one of the religious and charitable associations or communities in the Netherlands, and elsewhere, whose members live in beguinages and are not bound by perpetual vows.

Behave (v. t.) To carry; to conduct; to comport; to manage; to bear; -- used reflexively.

Behave (v. i.) To act; to conduct; to bear or carry one's self; as, to behave well or ill.

Behavior (n.) Manner of behaving, whether good or bad; mode of conducting one's self; conduct; deportment; carriage; -- used also of inanimate objects; as, the behavior of a ship in a storm; the behavior of the magnetic needle.

Behest (n.) That which is willed or ordered; a command; a mandate; an injunction.

Behight (v.) To give in trust; to commit; to intrust.

Behight (v.) To consider or esteem to be; to declare to be.

Behight (v.) To command; to order.

Behindhand (adv. & a.) In a state of backwardness, in respect to what is seasonable or appropriate, or as to what should have been accomplished; not equally forward with some other person or thing; dilatory; backward; late; tardy; as, behindhand in studies or in work.

Behoove (v. t.) To be necessary for; to be fit for; to be meet for, with respect to necessity, duty, or convenience; -- mostly used impersonally.

Being (n.) An abode; a cottage.

Beknow (v. t.) To confess; to acknowledge.

Bel-accoyle (n.) A kind or favorable reception or salutation.

Belace (v. t.) To fasten, as with a lace or cord.

Belace (v. t.) To cover or adorn with lace.

Belay (v. t.) To lay on or cover; to adorn.

Beldame (n.) Grandmother; -- corresponding to belsire.

Belemnite (n.) A conical calcareous fossil, tapering to a point at the lower extremity, with a conical cavity at the other end, where it is ordinarily broken; but when perfect it contains a small chambered cone, called the phragmocone, prolonged, on one side, into a delicate concave blade; the thunderstone. It is the internal shell of a cephalopod related to the sepia, and belonging to an extinct family. The belemnites are found in rocks of the Jurassic and Cretaceous ages.

Belgic (a.) Of or pertaining to the Belgae, a German tribe who anciently possessed the country between the Rhine, the Seine, and the ocean.

Belgravian (a.) Belonging to Belgravia (a fashionable quarter of London, around Pimlico), or to fashionable life; aristocratic.

Belie (n.) To show to be false; to convict of, or charge with, falsehood.

Belie (n.) To give a false representation or account of.

Belie (n.) To mimic; to counterfeit.

Belief (n.) Assent to a proposition or affirmation, or the acceptance of a fact, opinion, or assertion as real or true, without immediate personal knowledge; reliance upon word or testimony; partial or full assurance without positive knowledge or absolute certainty; persuasion; conviction; confidence; as, belief of a witness; the belief of our senses.

Believe (n.) To exercise belief in; to credit upon the authority or testimony of another; to be persuaded of the truth of, upon evidence furnished by reasons, arguments, and deductions of the mind, or by circumstances other than personal knowledge; to regard or accept as true; to place confidence in; to think; to consider; as, to believe a person, a statement, or a doctrine.

Belittle (v. t.) To make little or less in a moral sense; to speak of in a depreciatory or contemptuous way.

Bell (n.) A hollow metallic vessel, usually shaped somewhat like a cup with a flaring mouth, containing a clapper or tongue, and giving forth a ringing sound on being struck.

Bell (n.) A hollow perforated sphere of metal containing a loose ball which causes it to sound when moved.

Bell (n.) Anything in the form of a bell, as the cup or corol of a flower.

Bell (n.) That part of the capital of a column included between the abacus and neck molding; also used for the naked core of nearly cylindrical shape, assumed to exist within the leafage of a capital.

Bell (v. i.) To develop bells or corollas; to take the form of a bell; to blossom; as, hops bell.

Belladonna (n.) An herbaceous European plant (Atropa belladonna) with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berries. The whole plant and its fruit are very poisonous, and the root and leaves are used as powerful medicinal agents. Its properties are largely due to the alkaloid atropine which it contains. Called also deadly nightshade.

Bell animalcule () An infusorian of the family Vorticellidae, common in fresh-water ponds.

Bellbird (n.) A South American bird of the genus Casmarhincos, and family Cotingidae, of several species; the campanero.

Bell-faced (a.) Having the striking surface convex; -- said of hammers.

Bellicose (a.) Inclined to war or contention; warlike; pugnacious.

Bellicosely (adv.) In a bellicose manner.

Bellicous (a.) Bellicose.

Bellied (a.) Having (such) a belly; puffed out; -- used in composition; as, pot-bellied; shad-bellied.

Belligerent (n.) A nation or state recognized as carrying on war; a person engaged in warfare.

Bell metal () A hard alloy or bronze, consisting usually of about three parts of copper to one of tin; -- used for making bells.

Bellon (n.) Lead colic.

Bellow (v.) To roar; as the sea in a tempest, or as the wind when violent; to make a loud, hollow, continued sound.

Bellows (n. sing. & pl.) An instrument, utensil, or machine, which, by alternate expansion and contraction, or by rise and fall of the top, draws in air through a valve and expels it through a tube for various purposes, as blowing fires, ventilating mines, or filling the pipes of an organ with wind.

Bellows fish () A European fish (Centriscus scolopax), distinguished by a long tubular snout, like the pipe of a bellows; -- called also trumpet fish, and snipe fish.

Belly (n.) That part of the human body which extends downward from the breast to the thighs, and contains the bowels, or intestines; the abdomen.

Belly (n.) The under part of the body of animals, corresponding to the human belly.

Belly (n.) The hollow part of a curved or bent timber, the convex part of which is the back.

Belly (v. i.) To swell and become protuberant, like the belly; to bulge.

Bellyache (n.) Pain in the bowels; colic.

Bellybound (a.) Costive; constipated.

Bellycheat (n.) An apron or covering for the front of the person.

Belong (v. i.) To be a part of, or connected with; to be appendant or related; to owe allegiance or service.

Belong (v. i.) To be the concern or proper business or function of; to appertain to.

Belonging (n.) That which is connected with a principal or greater thing; an appendage; an appurtenance.

Below (adv.) In court or tribunal of inferior jurisdiction; as, at the trial below.

Belt (n.) That which restrains or confines as a girdle.

Belt (n.) A band of leather, or other flexible substance, passing around two wheels, and communicating motion from one to the other.

Belt (n.) A band or stripe, as of color, round any organ; or any circular ridge or series of ridges.

Belt (v. t.) To encircle with, or as with, a belt; to encompass; to surround.

Beltane (n.) A festival of the heathen Celts on the first day of May, in the observance of which great bonfires were kindled. It still exists in a modified form in some parts of Scotland and Ireland.

Belting (n.) The material of which belts for machinery are made; also, belts, taken collectively.

Belvedere (n.) A small building, or a part of a building, more or less open, constructed in a place commanding a fine prospect.

Bemask (v. t.) To mask; to conceal.

Bemuddle (v. t.) To muddle; to stupefy or bewilder; to confuse.

Bemuffle (v. t.) To cover as with a muffler; to wrap up.

Bench (n.) The seat where judges sit in court.

Bench (n.) The persons who sit as judges; the court; as, the opinion of the full bench. See King's Bench.

Bench (n.) A collection or group of dogs exhibited to the public; -- so named because the animals are usually placed on benches or raised platforms.

Bench (n.) A conformation like a bench; a long stretch of flat ground, or a kind of natural terrace, near a lake or river.

Bencher (n.) An alderman of a corporation.

Bencher (n.) A member of a court or council.

Bench warrant () A process issued by a presiding judge or by a court against a person guilty of some contempt, or indicted for some crime; -- so called in distinction from a justice's warrant.

Bend (n.) One of the honorable ordinaries, containing a third or a fifth part of the field. It crosses the field diagonally from the dexter chief to the sinister base.

Beneath (prep.) Lower in rank, dignity, or excellence than; as, brutes are beneath man; man is beneath angels in the scale of beings. Hence: Unworthy of; unbecoming.

Benedicite (n.) An exclamation corresponding to Bless you !.

Benediction (n.) The form of instituting an abbot, answering to the consecration of a bishop.

Benedictionary (n.) A collected series of benedictions.

Benefaction (n.) The act of conferring a benefit.

Benefaction (n.) A benefit conferred; esp. a charitable donation.

Benefactor (n.) One who confers a benefit or benefits.

Benefactress (n.) A woman who confers a benefit.

Beneficial (a.) Conferring benefits; useful; profitable; helpful; advantageous; serviceable; contributing to a valuable end; -- followed by to.

Beneficiary (a.) Holding some office or valuable possession, in subordination to another; holding under a feudal or other superior; having a dependent and secondary possession.

Beneficiary (n.) One who receives anything as a gift; one who receives a benefit or advantage; esp. one who receives help or income from an educational fund or a trust estate.

Benefit (n.) An act of kindness; a favor conferred.

Benefit (n.) A theatrical performance, a concert, or the like, the proceeds of which do not go to the lessee of the theater or to the company, but to some individual actor, or to some charitable use.

Benefit (n.) Natural advantages; endowments; accomplishments.

Benefiter (n.) One who confers a benefit; -- also, one who receives a benefit.

Benevolence (n.) The disposition to do good; good will; charitableness; love of mankind, accompanied with a desire to promote their happiness.

Benevolence (n.) A species of compulsory contribution or tax, which has sometimes been illegally exacted by arbitrary kings of England, and falsely represented as a gratuity.

Benightment (n.) The condition of being benighted.

Benjamin (n.) A kind of upper coat for men.

Bennet (a.) The common yellow-flowered avens of Europe (Geum urbanum); herb bennet. The name is sometimes given to other plants, as the hemlock, valerian, etc.

Bent (a. & p. p.) Strongly inclined toward something, so as to be resolved, determined, set, etc.; -- said of the mind, character, disposition, desires, etc., and used with on; as, to be bent on going to college; he is bent on mischief.

Bent (v.) Particular direction or tendency; flexion; course.

Bent (n.) A reedlike grass; a stalk of stiff, coarse grass.

Bent (n.) Any neglected field or broken ground; a common; a moor.

Benthamism (n.) That phase of the doctrine of utilitarianism taught by Jeremy Bentham; the doctrine that the morality of actions is estimated and determined by their utility; also, the theory that the sensibility to pleasure and the recoil from pain are the only motives which influence human desires and actions, and that these are the sufficient explanation of ethical and jural conceptions.

Benty (a.) A bounding in bents, or the stalks of coarse, stiff, withered grass; as, benty fields.

Benumb (a.) To make torpid; to deprive of sensation or sensibility; to stupefy; as, a hand or foot benumbed by cold.

Benzal (n.) A compound radical, C6H5.CH, of the aromatic series, related to benzyl and benzoyl; -- used adjectively or in combination.

Benzamide (n.) A transparent crystalline substance, C6H5.CO.NH2, obtained by the action of ammonia upon chloride of benzoyl, as also by several other reactions with benzoyl compounds.

Benzene (n.) A volatile, very inflammable liquid, C6H6, contained in the naphtha produced by the destructive distillation of coal, from which it is separated by fractional distillation. The name is sometimes applied also to the impure commercial product or benzole, and also, but rarely, to a similar mixed product of petroleum.

Benzile (n.) A yellowish crystalline substance, C6H5.CO.CO.C6H5, formed from benzoin by the action of oxidizing agents, and consisting of a doubled benzoyl radical.

Benzine (n.) A liquid consisting mainly of the lighter and more volatile hydrocarbons of petroleum or kerosene oil, used as a solvent and for cleansing soiled fabrics; -- called also petroleum spirit, petroleum benzine. Varieties or similar products are gasoline, naphtha, rhigolene, ligroin, etc.

Benzoyl (n.) A compound radical, C6H5.CO; the base of benzoic acid, of the oil of bitter almonds, and of an extensive series of compounds.

Benzyl (n.) A compound radical, C6H5.CH2, related to toluene and benzoic acid; -- commonly used adjectively.

Bepaint (v. t.) To paint; to cover or color with, or as with, paint.

Beplaster (v. t.) To plaster over; to cover or smear thickly; to bedaub.

Bepommel (v. t.) To pommel; to beat, as with a stick; figuratively, to assail or criticise in conversation, or in writing.

Bepowder (v. t.) To sprinkle or cover with powder; to powder.

Bepurple (v. t.) To tinge or dye with a purple color.

Bequeath (v. t.) To give; to offer; to commit.

Bequote (v. t.) To quote constantly or with great frequency.

Berate (v. t.) To rate or chide vehemently; to scold.

Berattle (v. t.) To make rattle; to scold vociferously; to cry down.

Bergamot (n.) A coarse tapestry, manufactured from flock of cotton or hemp, mixed with ox's or goat's hair; -- said to have been invented at Bergamo, Italy. Encyc. Brit.

Bergmeal (n.) An earthy substance, resembling fine flour. It is composed of the shells of infusoria, and in Lapland and Sweden is sometimes eaten, mixed with flour or ground birch bark, in times of scarcity. This name is also given to a white powdery variety of calcite.

Bermuda grass () A kind of grass (Cynodon Dactylon) esteemed for pasture in the Southern United States. It is a native of Southern Europe, but is now wide-spread in warm countries; -- called also scutch grass, and in Bermuda, devil grass.

Berried (a.) Furnished with berries; consisting of a berry; baccate; as, a berried shrub.

Berry (n.) The coffee bean.

Berth (n.) A room in which a number of the officers or ship's company mess and reside.

Berth (v. t.) To allot or furnish berths to, on shipboard; as, to berth a ship's company.

Bertha (n.) A kind of collar or cape worn by ladies.

Berthierite (n.) A double sulphide of antimony and iron, of a dark steel-gray color.

Berycoid (a.) Of or pertaining to the Berycidae, a family of marine fishes.

Beryl (n.) A mineral of great hardness, and, when transparent, of much beauty. It occurs in hexagonal prisms, commonly of a green or bluish green color, but also yellow, pink, and white. It is a silicate of aluminium and glucinum (beryllium). The aquamarine is a transparent, sea-green variety used as a gem. The emerald is another variety highly prized in jewelry, and distinguished by its deep color, which is probably due to the presence of a little oxide of chromium.

Berylline (a.) Like a beryl; of a light or bluish green color.

Berylloid (n.) A solid consisting of a double twelve-sided pyramid; -- so called because the planes of this form occur on crystals of beryl.

Bescatter (v. t.) To cover sparsely by scattering (something); to strew.

Bescorn (v. t.) To treat with scorn.

Bescratch (v. t.) To tear with the nails; to cover with scratches.

Bescrawl (v. t.) To cover with scrawls; to scribble over.

Bescreen (v. t.) To cover with a screen, or as with a screen; to shelter; to conceal.

Beseem (v. t.) Literally: To appear or seem (well, ill, best, etc.) for (one) to do or to have. Hence: To be fit, suitable, or proper for, or worthy of; to become; to befit.

Beseeming (a.) Becoming; suitable.

Beseemly (a.) Fit; suitable; becoming.

Beseen (a.) Accomplished; versed.

Beshow (n.) A large food fish (Anoplopoma fimbria) of the north Pacific coast; -- called also candlefish.

Beshroud (v. t.) To cover with, or as with, a shroud; to screen.

Beside (n.) Aside from; out of the regular course or order of; in a state of deviation from; out of.

Besiege (v. t.) To beset or surround with armed forces, for the purpose of compelling to surrender; to lay siege to; to beleaguer; to beset.

Besit (v. t.) To suit; to fit; to become.

Besmear (v. t.) To smear with any viscous, glutinous matter; to bedaub; to soil.

Besmirch (v. t.) To smirch or soil; to discolor; to obscure. Hence: To dishonor; to sully.

Besnow (v. t.) To scatter like snow; to cover thick, as with snow flakes.

Besnow (v. t.) To cover with snow; to whiten with snow, or as with snow.

Besort (v. t.) To assort or be congruous with; to fit, or become.

Bespread (v. t.) To spread or cover over.

Bessemer steel () Steel made directly from cast iron, by burning out a portion of the carbon and other impurities that the latter contains, through the agency of a blast of air which is forced through the molten metal; -- so called from Sir Henry Bessemer, an English engineer, the inventor of the process.

Best (a.) Most advanced; most correct or complete; as, the best scholar; the best view of a subject.

Best (superl.) Most intimately; most thoroughly or correctly; as, what is expedient is best known to himself.

Bestar (v. t.) To sprinkle with, or as with, stars; to decorate with, or as with, stars; to bestud.

Bestead (v. t.) To put in a certain situation or condition; to circumstance; to place.

Bestial (n.) A domestic animal; also collectively, cattle; as, other kinds of bestial.

Bestiality (n.) Unnatural connection with a beast.

Bestow (v. t.) To give or confer; to impart; -- with on or upon.

Bestow (v. t.) To demean; to conduct; to behave; -- followed by a reflexive pronoun.

Bestowment (n.) The act of giving or bestowing; a conferring or bestowal.

Bet (n.) That which is laid, staked, or pledged, as between two parties, upon the event of a contest or any contingent issue; the act of giving such a pledge; a wager.

Bet (v. t.) To stake or pledge upon the event of a contingent issue; to wager.

Betake (v. t.) To have recourse to; to apply; to resort; to go; -- with a reflexive pronoun.

Betake (v. t.) To commend or intrust to; to commit to.

Betaught (a.) Delivered; committed in trust.

Beteem (a.) To give ; to bestow; to grant; to accord; to consent.

Bethink (v. t.) To call to mind; to recall or bring to recollection, reflection, or consideration; to think; to consider; -- generally followed by a reflexive pronoun, often with of or that before the subject of thought.

Bethink (v. i.) To think; to recollect; to consider.

Bethlehem (n.) A hospital for lunatics; -- corrupted into bedlam.

Betide (v. t.) To happen to; to befall; to come to ; as, woe betide the wanderer.

Betide (v. i.) To come to pass; to happen; to occur.

Beton (n.) The French name for concrete; hence, concrete made after the French fashion.

Betray (v. t.) To violate the confidence of, by disclosing a secret, or that which one is bound in honor not to make known.

Betray (v. t.) To disclose or discover, as something which prudence would conceal; to reveal unintentionally.

Betray (v. t.) To mislead; to expose to inconvenience not foreseen to lead into error or sin.

Betray (v. t.) To show or to indicate; -- said of what is not obvious at first, or would otherwise be concealed.

Betroth (v. t.) To contract to any one for a marriage; to engage or promise in order to marriage; to affiance; -- used esp. of a woman.

Betroth (v. t.) To nominate to a bishopric, in order to consecration.

Betrothal (n.) The act of betrothing, or the fact of being betrothed; a mutual promise, engagement, or contract for a future marriage between the persons betrothed; betrothment; affiance.

Betso (n.) A small brass Venetian coin.

Better (compar.) In a superior or more excellent manner; with more skill and wisdom, courage, virtue, advantage, or success; as, Henry writes better than John; veterans fight better than recruits.

Better (compar.) More correctly or thoroughly.

Better (compar.) In a higher or greater degree; more; as, to love one better than another.

Better (compar.) More, in reference to value, distance, time, etc.; as, ten miles and better.

Better (a.) To improve the condition of, morally, physically, financially, socially, or otherwise.

Better (v. i.) To become better; to improve.

Betty (n.) A name of contempt given to a man who interferes with the duties of women in a household, or who occupies himself with womanish matters.

Betty (n.) A pear-shaped bottle covered round with straw, in which olive oil is sometimes brought from Italy; -- called by chemists a Florence flask.

Betulin (n.) A substance of a resinous nature, obtained from the outer bark of the common European birch (Betula alba), or from the tar prepared therefrom; -- called also birch camphor.

Between (prep.) Belonging in common to two; shared by both.

Between (prep.) With relation to two, as involved in an act or attribute of which another is the agent or subject; as, to judge between or to choose between courses; to distinguish between you and me; to mediate between nations.

Bevel (n.) An instrument consisting of two rules or arms, jointed together at one end, and opening to any angle, for adjusting the surfaces of work to the same or a given inclination; -- called also a bevel square.

Bevel gear () A kind of gear in which the two wheels working together lie in different planes, and have their teeth cut at right angles to the surfaces of two cones whose apices coincide with the point where the axes of the wheels would meet.

Bevy (n.) A company; an assembly or collection of persons, especially of ladies.

Beware (v. i.) To be on one's guard; to be cautious; to take care; -- commonly followed by of or lest before the thing that is to be avoided.

Bewhore (v. t.) To corrupt with regard to chastity; to make a whore of.

Bewig (v. t.) To cover (the head) with a wig.

Bewilder (v. t.) To lead into perplexity or confusion, as for want of a plain path; to perplex with mazes; or in general, to perplex or confuse greatly.

Bewilderment (n.) A bewildering tangle or confusion.

Bewrap (v. t.) To wrap up; to cover.

Bezant (n.) A gold coin of Byzantium or Constantinople, varying in weight and value, usually (those current in England) between a sovereign and a half sovereign. There were also white or silver bezants.

Bezant (n.) A circle in or, i. e., gold, representing the gold coin called bezant.

Bezant (n.) A decoration of a flat surface, as of a band or belt, representing circular disks lapping one upon another.

Bez-antler (n.) The second branch of a stag's horn.

Bezel (n.) The rim which encompasses and fastens a jewel or other object, as the crystal of a watch, in the cavity in which it is set.

Bezique (n.) A game at cards in which various combinations of cards in the hand, when declared, score points.

Bezoar (n.) A calculous concretion found in the intestines of certain ruminant animals (as the wild goat, the gazelle, and the Peruvian llama) formerly regarded as an unfailing antidote for poison, and a certain remedy for eruptive, pestilential, or putrid diseases. Hence: Any antidote or panacea.

Bezoardic (a.) Pertaining to, or compounded with, bezoar.

Bezoardic (n.) A medicine containing bezoar.

Bezonian (n.) A low fellow or scoundrel; a beggar.

Bhang (n.) An astringent and narcotic drug made from the dried leaves and seed capsules of wild hemp (Cannabis Indica), and chewed or smoked in the East as a means of intoxication. See Hasheesh.

Bi- () In most branches of science bi- in composition denotes two, twice, or doubly; as, bidentate, two-toothed; biternate, doubly ternate, etc.

Bi- () In the composition of chemical names bi- denotes two atoms, parts, or equivalents of that constituent to the name of which it is prefixed, to one of the other component, or that such constituent is present in double the ordinary proportion; as, bichromate, bisulphide. Be- and di- are often used interchangeably.

Biangular (a.) Having two angles or corners.

Biarticulate (a.) Having, or consisting of, tow joints.

Bib (n.) An arctic fish (Gadus luscus), allied to the cod; -- called also pout and whiting pout.

Bib (n.) A bibcock.

Bibb (n.) A bibcock. See Bib, n., 3.

Bibber (n.) One given to drinking alcoholic beverages too freely; a tippler; -- chiefly used in composition; as, winebibber.

Bibcock (n.) A cock or faucet having a bent down nozzle.

Bible (n.) A book containing the sacred writings belonging to any religion; as, the Koran is often called the Mohammedan Bible.

Biblically (adv.) According to the Bible.

Bibliology (n.) An account of books; book lore; bibliography.

Bibliomancy (n.) A kind of divination, performed by selecting passages of Scripture at hazard, and drawing from them indications concerning future events.

Bise (n.) A pale blue pigment, prepared from the native blue carbonate of copper, or from smalt; -- called also blue bice.

Bichloride (n.) A compound consisting of two atoms of chlorine with one or more atoms of another element; -- called also dichloride.

Bichromate (n.) A salt containing two parts of chromic acid to one of the other ingredients; as, potassium bichromate; -- called also dichromate.

Bichromatize (v. t.) To combine or treat with a bichromate, esp. with bichromate of potassium; as, bichromatized gelatine.

Bicker (v. i.) To contend in petulant altercation; to wrangle.

Bicker (n.) A skirmish; an encounter.

Bicker (n.) A wrangle; also, a noise,, as in angry contention.

Bicolligate (v. t.) Having the anterior toes connected by a basal web.

Bicolor (a.) Alt. of Bicolored

Bicolored (a.) Of two colors.

Biconcave (a.) Concave on both sides; as, biconcave vertebrae.

Biconjugate (a.) Twice paired, as when a petiole forks twice.

Biconvex (a.) Convex on both sides; as, a biconvex lens.

Bicorn (a.) Alt. of Bicornous

Bicorned (a.) Alt. of Bicornous

Bicornous (a.) Having two horns; two-horned; crescentlike.

Bicorporal (a.) Having two bodies.

Bicorporate (a.) Double-bodied, as a lion having one head and two bodies.

Bicostate (a.) Having two principal ribs running longitudinally, as a leaf.

Bid (v. t.) To make an offer of; to propose. Specifically : To offer to pay ( a certain price, as for a thing put up at auction), or to take (a certain price, as for work to be done under a contract).

Bid (v. t.) To offer in words; to declare, as a wish, a greeting, a threat, or defiance, etc.; as, to bid one welcome; to bid good morning, farewell, etc.

Bid (v. t.) To order; to direct; to enjoin; to command.

Bid (v. t.) To invite; to call in; to request to come.

Bidale (n.) An invitation of friends to drink ale at some poor man's house, and there to contribute in charity for his relief.

Biddery ware () A kind of metallic ware made in India. The material is a composition of zinc, tin, and lead, in which ornaments of gold and silver are inlaid or damascened.

Bide (v. t.) To remain; to continue or be permanent in a place or state; to continue to be.

Bide (v. t.) To encounter; to remain firm under (a hardship); to endure; to suffer; to undergo.

Biennial (a.) Continuing for two years, and then perishing, as plants which form roots and leaves the first year, and produce fruit the second.

Bier (n.) A handbarrow or portable frame on which a corpse is placed or borne to the grave.

Bier (n.) A count of forty threads in the warp or chain of woolen cloth.

Beestings (n. pl.) The first milk given by a cow after calving.

Bifoliolate (a.) Having two leaflets, as some compound leaves.

Bifurcous (a.) See Bifurcate, a.

Bigeminate (a.) Having a forked petiole, and a pair of leaflets at the end of each division; biconjugate; twice paired; -- said of a decompound leaf.

Biggen (v. t. & i.) To make or become big; to enlarge.

Bigger (a.) compar. of Big.

Biggin (n.) A coffeepot with a strainer or perforated metallic vessel for holding the ground coffee, through which boiling water is poured; -- so called from Mr. Biggin, the inventor.

Biggonnet (n.) A cap or hood with pieces covering the ears.

Bight (v.) A corner, bend, or angle; a hollow; as, the bight of a horse's knee; the bight of an elbow.

Bight (v.) A bend in a coast forming an open bay; as, the Bight of Benin.

Bight (v.) The double part of a rope when folded, in distinction from the ends; that is, a round, bend, or coil not including the ends; a loop.

Bignonia (n.) A large genus of American, mostly tropical, climbing shrubs, having compound leaves and showy somewhat tubular flowers. B. capreolata is the cross vine of the Southern United States. The trumpet creeper was formerly considered to be of this genus.

Bigot (n.) A person who regards his own faith and views in matters of religion as unquestionably right, and any belief or opinion opposed to or differing from them as unreasonable or wicked. In an extended sense, a person who is intolerant of opinions which conflict with his own, as in politics or morals; one obstinately and blindly devoted to his own church, party, belief, or opinion.

Bigwig (a.) A person of consequence; as, the bigwigs of society.

Bihydroguret (n.) A compound of two atoms of hydrogen with some other substance.

Bikh (n.) The East Indian name of a virulent poison extracted from Aconitum ferox or other species of aconite: also, the plant itself.

Bilabiate (a.) Having two lips, as the corols of certain flowers.

Bilander (n.) A small two-masted merchant vessel, fitted only for coasting, or for use in canals, as in Holland.

Bilbo (n.) A long bar or bolt of iron with sliding shackles, and a lock at the end, to confine the feet of prisoners or offenders, esp. on board of ships.

Bilcock (n.) The European water rail.

Bile (n.) A yellow, or greenish, viscid fluid, usually alkaline in reaction, secreted by the liver. It passes into the intestines, where it aids in the digestive process. Its characteristic constituents are the bile salts, and coloring matters.

Biliary (a.) Relating or belonging to bile; conveying bile; as, biliary acids; biliary ducts.

Bilin (n.) A name applied to the amorphous or crystalline mass obtained from bile by the action of alcohol and ether. It is composed of a mixture of the sodium salts of the bile acids.

Bilinear (a.) Of, pertaining to, or included by, two lines; as, bilinear coordinates.

Bilingual (a.) Containing, or consisting of, two languages; expressed in two languages; as, a bilingual inscription; a bilingual dictionary.

Biliteral (n.) A word, syllable, or root, consisting of two letters.

Bilk (n.) A thwarting an adversary in cribbage by spoiling his score; a balk.

Bill (n.) A weapon of infantry, in the 14th and 15th centuries. A common form of bill consisted of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, having a short pike at the back and another at the top, and attached to the end of a long staff.

Bill (n.) A declaration made in writing, stating some wrong the complainant has suffered from the defendant, or a fault committed by some person against a law.

Bill (n.) An account of goods sold, services rendered, or work done, with the price or charge; a statement of a creditor's claim, in gross or by items; as, a grocer's bill.

Bill (n.) Any paper, containing a statement of particulars; as, a bill of charges or expenditures; a weekly bill of mortality; a bill of fare, etc.

Billard (n.) An English fish, allied to the cod; the coalfish.

Billbug (n.) A weevil or curculio of various species, as the corn weevil. See Curculio.

Bill book () A book in which a person keeps an account of his notes, bills, bills of exchange, etc., thus showing all that he issues and receives.

Bill broker () One who negotiates the discount of bills.

Billed (a.) Furnished with, or having, a bill, as a bird; -- used in composition; as, broad-billed.

Billfish (n.) The saury, a slender fish of the Atlantic coast (Scomberesox saurus).

Billhead (n.) A printed form, used by merchants in making out bills or rendering accounts.

Billiards (n.) A game played with ivory balls o a cloth-covered, rectangular table, bounded by elastic cushions. The player seeks to impel his ball with his cue so that it shall either strike (carom upon) two other balls, or drive another ball into one of the pockets with which the table sometimes is furnished.

Billion (n.) According to the French and American method of numeration, a thousand millions, or 1,000,000,000; according to the English method, a million millions, or 1,000,000,000,000. See Numeration.

Billon (n.) An alloy of gold and silver with a large proportion of copper or other base metal, used in coinage.

Billyboy (n.) A flat-bottomed river barge or coasting vessel.

Bilocular (a.) Divided into two cells or compartments; as, a bilocular pericarp.

Bimastism (n.) The condition of having two mammae or teats.

Bimedial (a.) Applied to a line which is the sum of two lines commensurable only in power (as the side and diagonal of a square).

Bimetallic (a.) Of or relating to, or using, a double metallic standard (as gold and silver) for a system of coins or currency.

Bimetallism (n.) The legalized use of two metals (as gold and silver) in the currency of a country, at a fixed relative value; -- in opposition to monometallism.

Bimonthly (a.) Occurring, done, or coming, once in two months; as, bimonthly visits; bimonthly publications.

Bin (n.) A box, frame, crib, or inclosed place, used as a receptacle for any commodity; as, a corn bin; a wine bin; a coal bin.

Binary (a.) Compounded or consisting of two things or parts; characterized by two (things).

Binary (n.) That which is constituted of two figures, things, or parts; two; duality.

Binate (a.) Double; growing in pairs or couples.

Bind (v. t.) To tie, or confine with a cord, band, ligature, chain, etc.; to fetter; to make fast; as, to bind grain in bundles; to bind a prisoner.

Bind (v. t.) To confine, restrain, or hold by physical force or influence of any kind; as, attraction binds the planets to the sun; frost binds the earth, or the streams.

Bind (v. t.) To cover, as with a bandage; to bandage or dress; -- sometimes with up; as, to bind up a wound.

Bind (v. t.) To make fast ( a thing) about or upon something, as by tying; to encircle with something; as, to bind a belt about one; to bind a compress upon a part.

Bind (v. t.) To sew or fasten together, and inclose in a cover; as, to bind a book.

Bind (v. t.) Fig.: To oblige, restrain, or hold, by authority, law, duty, promise, vow, affection, or other moral tie; as, to bind the conscience; to bind by kindness; bound by affection; commerce binds nations to each other.

Bind (v. t.) To bring (any one) under definite legal obligations; esp. under the obligation of a bond or covenant.

Bind (v. i.) To tie; to confine by any ligature.

Bind (v. i.) To contract; to grow hard or stiff; to cohere or stick together in a mass; as, clay binds by heat.

Binder (n.) Anything that binds, as a fillet, cord, rope, or band; a bandage; -- esp. the principal piece of timber intended to bind together any building.

Binding (n.) Anything that binds; a bandage; the cover of a book, or the cover with the sewing, etc.; something that secures the edge of cloth from raveling.

Binding (pl.) The transoms, knees, beams, keelson, and other chief timbers used for connecting and strengthening the parts of a vessel.

Bindingness (n.) The condition or property of being binding; obligatory quality.

Binnacle (n.) A case or box placed near the helmsman, containing the compass of a ship, and a light to show it at night.

Binocle (n.) A dioptric telescope, fitted with two tubes joining, so as to enable a person to view an object with both eyes at once; a double-barreled field glass or an opera glass.

Binocular (a.) Adapted to the use of both eyes; as, a binocular microscope or telescope.

Binocular (n.) A binocular glass, whether opera glass, telescope, or microscope.

Binomial (n.) An expression consisting of two terms connected by the sign plus (+) or minus (-); as, a + b, or 7 - 3.

Biographer (n.) One who writes an account or history of the life of a particular person; a writer of lives, as Plutarch.

Biographical (a.) Of or pertaining to biography; containing biography.

Bioplasmic (a.) Pertaining to, or consisting of, bioplasm.

Bioplast (n.) A tiny mass of bioplasm, in itself a living unit and having formative power, as a living white blood corpuscle; bioblast.

Biotaxy (n.) The classification of living organisms according to their structural character; taxonomy.

Biotite (n.) Mica containing iron and magnesia, generally of a black or dark green color; -- a common constituent of crystalline rocks. See Mica.

Bipartite (a.) Being in two parts; having two correspondent parts, as a legal contract or writing, one for each party; shared by two; as, a bipartite treaty.

Bipartite (a.) Divided into two parts almost to the base, as a leaf; consisting of two parts or subdivisions.

Bipartition (n.) The act of dividing into two parts, or of making two correspondent parts, or the state of being so divided.

Bipectinated (a.) Having two margins toothed like a comb.

Bipeltate (a.) Having a shell or covering like a double shield.

Bipolar (a.) Doubly polar; having two poles; as, a bipolar cell or corpuscle.

Bipupillate (a.) Having an eyelike spot on the wing, with two dots within it of a different color, as in some butterflies.

Biramous (a.) Having, or consisting of, two branches.

Birch (n.) A tree of several species, constituting the genus Betula; as, the white or common birch (B. alba) (also called silver birch and lady birch); the dwarf birch (B. glandulosa); the paper or canoe birch (B. papyracea); the yellow birch (B. lutea); the black or cherry birch (B. lenta).

Birdcage (n.) A cage for confining birds.

Birdcall (n.) A sound made in imitation of the note or cry of a bird for the purpose of decoying the bird or its mate.

Bird fancier () One who takes pleasure in rearing or collecting rare or curious birds.

Bird of paradise () The name of several very beautiful birds of the genus Paradisea and allied genera, inhabiting New Guinea and the adjacent islands. The males have brilliant colors, elegant plumes, and often remarkable tail feathers.

Bird pepper () A species of capsicum (Capsicum baccatum), whose small, conical, coral-red fruit is among the most piquant of all red peppers.

Bird's-mouth (n.) An interior angle or notch cut across a piece of timber, for the reception of the edge of another, as that in a rafter to be laid on a plate; -- commonly called crow's-foot in the United States.

Bird's-nest (n.) The nest of a small swallow (Collocalia nidifica and several allied species), of China and the neighboring countries, which is mixed with soups.

Bird's-nesting (n.) Hunting for, or taking, birds' nests or their contents.

Birrus (n.) A coarse kind of thick woolen cloth, worn by the poor in the Middle Ages; also, a woolen cap or hood worn over the shoulders or over the head.

Birth (n.) The act or fact of coming into life, or of being born; -- generally applied to human beings; as, the birth of a son.

Birth (n.) The condition to which a person is born; natural state or position; inherited disposition or tendency.

Birthday (n.) The day in which any person is born; day of origin or commencement.

Birthplace (n.) The town, city, or country, where a person is born; place of origin or birth, in its more general sense.

Birthright (n.) Any right, privilege, or possession to which a person is entitled by birth, such as an estate descendible by law to an heir, or civil liberty under a free constitution; esp. the rights or inheritance of the first born.

Bis (adv.) Twice; -- a word showing that something is, or is to be, repeated; as a passage of music, or an item in accounts.

Biscotin (n.) A confection made of flour, sugar, marmalade, and eggs; a sweet biscuit.

Bise (n.) A cold north wind which prevails on the northern coasts of the Mediterranean and in Switzerland, etc.; -- nearly the same as the mistral.

Bishop (n.) In the Roman Catholic, Greek, and Anglican or Protestant Episcopal churches, one ordained to the highest order of the ministry, superior to the priesthood, and generally claiming to be a successor of the Apostles. The bishop is usually the spiritual head or ruler of a diocese, bishopric, or see.

Bishop (n.) In the Methodist Episcopal and some other churches, one of the highest church officers or superintendents.

Bishop (v. t.) To admit into the church by confirmation; to confirm; hence, to receive formally to favor.

Bishopdom (n.) Jurisdiction of a bishop; episcopate.

Bishoply (a.) Bishoplike; episcopal.

Bisilicate (n.) A salt of metasilicic acid; -- so called because the ratio of the oxygen of the silica to the oxygen of the base is as two to one. The bisilicates include many of the most common and important minerals.

Bismillah (interj.) An adjuration or exclamation common among the Mohammedans.

Bismuth (n.) One of the elements; a metal of a reddish white color, crystallizing in rhombohedrons. It is somewhat harder than lead, and rather brittle; masses show broad cleavage surfaces when broken across. It melts at 507¡ Fahr., being easily fused in the flame of a candle. It is found in a native state, and as a constituent of some minerals. Specific gravity 9.8. Atomic weight 207.5. Symbol Bi.

Bismuthic (a.) Of or pertaining to bismuth; containing bismuth, when this element has its higher valence; as, bismuthic oxide.

Bismuthous (a.) Of, or containing, bismuth, when this element has its lower valence.

Bismuthyl (n.) Hydrous carbonate of bismuth, an earthy mineral of a dull white or yellowish color.

Bissextile (n.) Leap year; every fourth year, in which a day is added to the month of February on account of the excess of the tropical year (365 d. 5 h. 48 m. 46 s.) above 365 days. But one day added every four years is equivalent to six hours each year, which is 11 m. 14 s. more than the excess of the real year. Hence, it is necessary to suppress the bissextile day at the end of every century which is not divisible by 400, while it is retained at the end of those which are divisible by 400.

Bistoury (n.) A surgical instrument consisting of a slender knife, either straight or curved, generally used by introducing it beneath the part to be divided, and cutting towards the surface.

Bisulcous (a.) Bisulcate.

Bit (v.) In the Southern and Southwestern States, a small silver coin (as the real) formerly current; commonly, one worth about 12 1/2 cents; also, the sum of 12 1/2 cents.

Bitake (v. t.) To commend; to commit.

Bite (v.) A blank on the edge or corner of a page, owing to a portion of the frisket, or something else, intervening between the type and paper.

Biting in () The process of corroding or eating into metallic plates, by means of an acid. See Etch.

Bitter (v. t.) Causing pain or smart; piercing; painful; sharp; severe; as, a bitter cold day.

Bittering (n.) A bitter compound used in adulterating beer; bittern.

Bittern (a.) The brine which remains in salt works after the salt is concreted, having a bitter taste from the chloride of magnesium which it contains.

Bittern (a.) A very bitter compound of quassia, cocculus Indicus, etc., used by fraudulent brewers in adulterating beer.

Bitter spar () A common name of dolomite; -- so called because it contains magnesia, the soluble salts of which are bitter. See Dolomite.

Bittersweet (n.) A climbing shrub, with oval coral-red berries (Solanum dulcamara); woody nightshade. The whole plant is poisonous, and has a taste at first sweetish and then bitter. The branches are the officinal dulcamara.

Bittersweet (n.) An American woody climber (Celastrus scandens), whose yellow capsules open late in autumn, and disclose the red aril which covers the seeds; -- also called Roxbury waxwork.

Bitumen (n.) Mineral pitch; a black, tarry substance, burning with a bright flame; Jew's pitch. It occurs as an abundant natural product in many places, as on the shores of the Dead and Caspian Seas. It is used in cements, in the construction of pavements, etc. See Asphalt.

Bituminize (v. t.) To prepare, treat, impregnate, or coat with bitumen.

Bituminous (a.) Having the qualities of bitumen; compounded with bitumen; containing bitumen.

Bivalent (p. pr.) Equivalent in combining or displacing power to two atoms of hydrogen; dyad.

Bivalve (n.) A mollusk having a shell consisting of two lateral plates or valves joined together by an elastic ligament at the hinge, which is usually strengthened by prominences called teeth. The shell is closed by the contraction of two transverse muscles attached to the inner surface, as in the clam, -- or by one, as in the oyster. See Mollusca.

Bivouac (n.) An encampment for the night without tents or covering.

Bivouac (v. i.) To encamp for the night without tents or covering.

Black (a.) Destitute of light, or incapable of reflecting it; of the color of soot or coal; of the darkest or a very dark color, the opposite of white; characterized by such a color; as, black cloth; black hair or eyes.

Black (a.) Expressing menace, or discontent; threatening; sullen; foreboding; as, to regard one with black looks.

Black (n.) That which is destitute of light or whiteness; the darkest color, or rather a destitution of all color; as, a cloth has a good black.

Black (n.) A negro; a person whose skin is of a black color, or shaded with black; esp. a member or descendant of certain African races.

Black (n.) Mourning garments of a black color; funereal drapery.

Black art () The art practiced by conjurers and witches; necromancy; conjuration; magic.

Blackball (n.) A composition for blacking shoes, boots, etc.; also, one for taking impressions of engraved work.

Blackball (n.) A ball of black color, esp. one used as a negative in voting; -- in this sense usually two words.

Blackband (n.) An earthy carbonate of iron containing considerable carbonaceous matter; -- valuable as an iron ore.

Blackberry (n.) The fruit of several species of bramble (Rubus); also, the plant itself. Rubus fruticosus is the blackberry of England; R. villosus and R. Canadensis are the high blackberry and low blackberry of the United States. There are also other kinds.

Blackbird (n.) In England, a species of thrush (Turdus merula), a singing bird with a fin note; the merle. In America the name is given to several birds, as the Quiscalus versicolor, or crow blackbird; the Agelaeus phoeniceus, or red-winged blackbird; the cowbird; the rusty grackle, etc. See Redwing.

Black book () One of several books of a political character, published at different times and for different purposes; -- so called either from the color of the binding, or from the character of the contents.

Black book () A book compiled in the twelfth century, containing a description of the court of exchequer of England, an official statement of the revenues of the crown, etc.

Black book () A book containing details of the enormities practiced in the English monasteries and religious houses, compiled by order of their visitors under Henry VIII., to hasten their dissolution.

Black book () A book of admiralty law, of the highest authority, compiled in the reign of Edw. III.

Blackcoat (n.) A clergyman; -- familiarly so called, as a soldier is sometimes called a redcoat or a bluecoat.

Blackcock (n.) The male of the European black grouse (Tetrao tetrix, Linn.); -- so called by sportsmen. The female is called gray hen. See Heath grouse.

Blackfeet (n. pl.) A tribe of North American Indians formerly inhabiting the country from the upper Missouri River to the Saskatchewan, but now much reduced in numbers.

Blackfish (n.) A small kind of whale, of the genus Globicephalus, of several species. The most common is G. melas. Also sometimes applied to other whales of larger size.

Blackfish (n.) The black sea bass (Centropristis atrarius) of the Atlantic coast. It is excellent food fish; -- locally called also black Harry.

Black friar () A friar of the Dominican order; -- called also predicant and preaching friar; in France, Jacobin. Also, sometimes, a Benedictine.

Blackguard (n.) The scullions and lower menials of a court, or of a nobleman's household, who, in a removal from one residence to another, had charge of the kitchen utensils, and being smutted by them, were jocularly called the "black guard"; also, the servants and hangers-on of an army.

Blackguard (n.) The criminals and vagrants or vagabonds of a town or community, collectively.

Blackguard (n.) A person of stained or low character, esp. one who uses scurrilous language, or treats others with foul abuse; a scoundrel; a rough.

Blackguardism (n.) The conduct or language of a blackguard; ruffianism.

Blackheart (n.) A heart-shaped cherry with a very dark-colored skin.

Black hole () A dungeon or dark cell in a prison; a military lock-up or guardroom; -- now commonly with allusion to the cell (the Black Hole) in a fort at Calcutta, into which 146 English prisoners were thrust by the nabob Suraja Dowla on the night of June 20, 17656, and in which 123 of the prisoners died before morning from lack of air.

Black-jack (n.) Caramel or burnt sugar, used to color wines, spirits, ground coffee, etc.

Blacklead (v. t.) To coat or to polish with black lead.

Black letter () The old English or Gothic letter, in which the Early English manuscripts were written, and the first English books were printed. It was conspicuous for its blackness. See Type.

Blackly (adv.) In a black manner; darkly, in color; gloomily; threateningly; atrociously.

Blackmail (n.) A certain rate of money, corn, cattle, or other thing, anciently paid, in the north of England and south of Scotland, to certain men who were allied to robbers, or moss troopers, to be by them protected from pillage.

Blackmail (n.) Black rent, or rent paid in corn, flesh, or the lowest coin, a opposed to "white rent", which paid in silver.

Black Monday () Easter Monday, so called from the severity of that day in 1360, which was so unusual that many of Edward III.'s soldiers, then before Paris, died from the cold.

Blackness (n.) The quality or state of being black; black color; atrociousness or enormity in wickedness.

Black Rod () An usher in the legislature of British colonies.

Blacks (n. pl.) The name of a kind of in used in copperplate printing, prepared from the charred husks of the grape, and residue of the wine press.

Blacksmith (n.) A fish of the Pacific coast (Chromis, / Heliastes, punctipinnis), of a blackish color.

Blacksnake (n.) A snake of a black color, of which two species are common in the United States, the Bascanium constrictor, or racer, sometimes six feet long, and the Scotophis Alleghaniensis, seven or eight feet long.

Blackstrap (n.) Bad port wine; any common wine of the Mediterranean; -- so called by sailors.

Black vomit () A copious vomiting of dark-colored matter; or the substance so discharged; -- one of the most fatal symptoms in yellow fever.

Blackwood (n.) A name given to several dark-colored timbers. The East Indian black wood is from the tree Dalbergia latifolia.

Bladed (a.) Divested of blades; as, bladed corn.

Blae (a.) Dark blue or bluish gray; lead-colored.

Blameful (a.) Attributing blame or fault; implying or conveying censure; faultfinding; censorious.

Blanch (a.) To take the color out of, and make white; to bleach; as, to blanch linen; age has blanched his hair.

Blanch (a.) To whiten, as the surface of meat, by plunging into boiling water and afterwards into cold, so as to harden the surface and retain the juices.

Blanch (a.) To give a white luster to (silver, before stamping, in the process of coining.).

Blanch (a.) To cover (sheet iron) with a coating of tin.

Blanch (v. i.) To grow or become white; as, his cheek blanched with fear; the rose blanches in the sun.

Blancmange (n.) A preparation for desserts, etc., made from isinglass, sea moss, cornstarch, or other gelatinous or starchy substance, with mild, usually sweetened and flavored, and shaped in a mold.

Bland (a.) Mild; soft; gentle; smooth and soothing in manner; suave; as, a bland temper; bland persuasion; a bland sycophant.

Blank (a.) Of a white or pale color; without color.

Blank (a.) Utterly confounded or discomfited.

Blank (a.) Lacking characteristics which give variety; as, a blank desert; a blank wall; destitute of interests, affections, hopes, etc.; as, to live a blank existence; destitute of sensations; as, blank unconsciousness.

Blank (n.) Any void space; a void space on paper, or in any written instrument; an interval void of consciousness, action, result, etc; a void.

Blank (n.) A paper containing the substance of a legal instrument, as a deed, release, writ, or execution, with spaces left to be filled with names, date, descriptions, etc.

Blank (n.) A kind of base silver money, first coined in England by Henry V., and worth about 8 pence; also, a French coin of the seventeenth century, worth about 4 pence.

Blank (n.) A piece of metal prepared to be made into something by a further operation, as a coin, screw, nuts.

Blank (v. t.) To blanch; to make blank; to damp the spirits of; to dispirit or confuse.

Blanket (a.) A heavy, loosely woven fabric, usually of wool, and having a nap, used in bed clothing; also, a similar fabric used as a robe; or any fabric used as a cover for a horse.

Blanket (v. t.) To cover with a blanket.

Blarney (v. t.) To influence by blarney; to wheedle with smooth talk; to make or accomplish by blarney.

Blasphemous (a.) Speaking or writing blasphemy; uttering or exhibiting anything impiously irreverent; profane; as, a blasphemous person; containing blasphemy; as, a blasphemous book; a blasphemous caricature.

Blast (n.) A forcible stream of air from an orifice, as from a bellows, the mouth, etc. Hence: The continuous blowing to which one charge of ore or metal is subjected in a furnace; as, to melt so many tons of iron at a blast.

Blast (n.) The exhaust steam from and engine, driving a column of air out of a boiler chimney, and thus creating an intense draught through the fire; also, any draught produced by the blast.

Blast (v. t.) To confound by a loud blast or din.

Blastocoele (n.) The cavity of the blastosphere, or segmentation cavity.

Blastoidea (n. pl.) One of the divisions of Crinoidea found fossil in paleozoic rocks; pentremites. They are so named on account of their budlike form.

Blastophore (n.) That portion of the spermatospore which is not converted into spermatoblasts, but carries them.

Blast pipe () The exhaust pipe of a steam engine, or any pipe delivering steam or air, when so constructed as to cause a blast.

Blastula (n.) That stage in the development of the ovum in which the outer cells of the morula become more defined and form the blastoderm.

Blat (v. i.) To cry, as a calf or sheep; to bleat; to make a senseless noise; to talk inconsiderately.

Blat (v. t.) To utter inconsiderately.

Blaze (n.) A stream of gas or vapor emitting light and heat in the process of combustion; a bright flame.

Blaze (n.) Intense, direct light accompanied with heat; as, to seek shelter from the blaze of the sun.

Blaze (v. i.) To make public far and wide; to make known; to render conspicuous.

Blazon (n.) An heraldic shield; a coat of arms, or a bearing on a coat of arms; armorial bearings.

Blazon (n.) Ostentatious display, either by words or other means; publication; show; description; record.

Blazon (v. t.) To depict in colors; to display; to exhibit conspicuously; to publish or make public far and wide.

Blazon (v. i.) To shine; to be conspicuous.

Blazoner (n.) One who gives publicity, proclaims, or blazons; esp., one who blazons coats of arms; a herald.

Blazonry (n.) A coat of arms; an armorial bearing or bearings.

Bleach (a.) To make white, or whiter; to remove the color, or stains, from; to blanch; to whiten.

Bleach (v. i.) To grow white or lose color; to whiten.

Bleaching (n.) The act or process of whitening, by removing color or stains; esp. the process of whitening fabrics by chemical agents.

Bleak (a.) Without color; pale; pallid.

Bleak (a.) Desolate and exposed; swept by cold winds.

Bleareye (n.) A disease of the eyelids, consisting in chronic inflammation of the margins, with a gummy secretion of sebaceous matter.

Bleb (n.) A large vesicle or bulla, usually containing a serous fluid; a blister; a bubble, as in water, glass, etc.

Blee (n.) Complexion; color; hue; likeness; form.

Bleeder (n.) One in whom slight wounds give rise to profuse or uncontrollable bleeding.

Bleeding (a.) Emitting, or appearing to emit, blood or sap, etc.; also, expressing anguish or compassion.

Blench (v. i.) To shrink; to start back; to draw back, from lack of courage or resolution; to flinch; to quail.

Blench (v. t.) To baffle; to disconcert; to turn away; -- also, to obstruct; to hinder.

Blend (v. t.) To mix or mingle together; esp. to mingle, combine, or associate so that the separate things mixed, or the line of demarcation, can not be distinguished. Hence: To confuse; to confound.

Blend (v. t.) To pollute by mixture or association; to spoil or corrupt; to blot; to stain.

Blend (v. i.) To mingle; to mix; to unite intimately; to pass or shade insensibly into each other, as colors.

Blend (n.) A thorough mixture of one thing with another, as color, tint, etc., into another, so that it cannot be known where one ends or the other begins.

Blende (n.) A mineral, called also sphalerite, and by miners mock lead, false galena, and black-jack. It is a zinc sulphide, but often contains some iron. Its color is usually yellow, brown, or black, and its luster resinous.

Blendous (a.) Pertaining to, consisting of, or containing, blende.

Blenny (n.) A marine fish of the genus Blennius or family Blenniidae; -- so called from its coating of mucus. The species are numerous.

Bless (v. t.) To make or pronounce holy; to consecrate

Bless (v. t.) To make happy, blithesome, or joyous; to confer prosperity or happiness upon; to grant divine favor to.

Bless (v. t.) To invoke or confer beneficial attributes or qualities upon; to invoke or confer a blessing on, -- as on food.

Bless (v. t.) To esteem or account happy; to felicitate.

Blessed (a.) Hallowed; consecrated; worthy of blessing or adoration; heavenly; holy.

Blind (a.) Undiscerning; undiscriminating; inconsiderate.

Blind (a.) Having such a state or condition as a thing would have to a person who is blind; not well marked or easily discernible; hidden; unseen; concealed; as, a blind path; a blind ditch.

Blind (v. t.) To darken; to obscure to the eye or understanding; to conceal; to deceive.

Blind (v. t.) To cover with a thin coating of sand and fine gravel; as a road newly paved, in order that the joints between the stones may be filled.

Blind (n.) Something to hinder sight or keep out light; a screen; a cover; esp. a hinged screen or shutter for a window; a blinder for a horse.

Blind (n.) Something to mislead the eye or the understanding, or to conceal some covert deed or design; a subterfuge.

Blindage (n.) A cover or protection for an advanced trench or approach, formed of fascines and earth supported by a framework.

Blindfold (v. t.) To cover the eyes of, as with a bandage; to hinder from seeing.

Blindfold (a.) Having the eyes covered; blinded; having the mental eye darkened. Hence: Heedless; reckless; as, blindfold zeal; blindfold fury.

Blinding (n.) A thin coating of sand and fine gravel over a newly paved road. See Blind, v. t., 4.

Blindman's buff () A play in which one person is blindfolded, and tries to catch some one of the company and tell who it is.

Blindness (n.) State or condition of being blind, literally or figuratively.

Blister (n.) A vesicle of the skin, containing watery matter or serum, whether occasioned by a burn or other injury, or by a vesicatory; a collection of serous fluid causing a bladderlike elevation of the cuticle.

Blizzard (n.) A gale of piercingly cold wind, usually accompanied with fine and blinding snow; a furious blast.

Bloat (v. t.) To make turgid, as with water or air; to cause a swelling of the surface of, from effusion of serum in the cellular tissue, producing a morbid enlargement, often accompanied with softness.

Bloat (n.) A term of contempt for a worthless, dissipated fellow.

Bloater (n.) The common herring, esp. when of large size, smoked, and half dried; -- called also bloat herring.

Block (v. t.) The solid piece of wood on which condemned persons lay their necks when they are beheaded.

Block (v. t.) A large or long building divided into separate houses or shops, or a number of houses or shops built in contact with each other so as to form one building; a row of houses or shops.

Block (v. t.) A grooved pulley or sheave incased in a frame or shell which is provided with a hook, eye, or strap, by which it may be attached to an object. It is used to change the direction of motion, as in raising a heavy object that can not be conveniently reached, and also, when two or more such sheaves are compounded, to change the rate of motion, or to exert increased force; -- used especially in the rigging of ships, and in tackles.

Blocking course () The finishing course of a wall showing above a cornice.

Blonde (v. t.) Of a fair color; light-colored; as, blond hair; a blond complexion.

Blonde (n.) A person of very fair complexion, with light hair and light blue eyes.

Blonde (n.) A kind of silk lace originally of the color of raw silk, now sometimes dyed; -- called also blond lace.

Blood (n.) Relationship by descent from a common ancestor; consanguinity; kinship.

Blood (n.) Descent from parents of recognized breed; excellence or purity of breed.

Bloodbird (n.) An Australian honeysucker (Myzomela sanguineolata); -- so called from the bright red color of the male bird.

Bloodhound (n.) A breed of large and powerful dogs, with long, smooth, and pendulous ears, and remarkable for acuteness of smell. It is employed to recover game or prey which has escaped wounded from a hunter, and for tracking criminals. Formerly it was used for pursuing runaway slaves. Other varieties of dog are often used for the same purpose and go by the same name. The Cuban bloodhound is said to be a variety of the mastiff.

Blood money () Money obtained as the price, or at the cost, of another's life; -- said of a reward for supporting a capital charge, of money obtained for betraying a fugitive or for committing murder, or of money obtained from the sale of that which will destroy the purchaser.

Bloodroot (n.) A plant (Sanguinaria Canadensis), with a red root and red sap, and bearing a pretty, white flower in early spring; -- called also puccoon, redroot, bloodwort, tetterwort, turmeric, and Indian paint. It has acrid emetic properties, and the rootstock is used as a stimulant expectorant. See Sanguinaria.

Bloodshot (a.) Red and inflamed; suffused with blood, or having the vessels turgid with blood, as when the conjunctiva is inflamed or irritated.

Bloodstroke (n.) Loss of sensation and motion from hemorrhage or congestion in the brain.

Bloodwit (n.) A fine or amercement paid as a composition for the shedding of blood; also, a riot wherein blood was spilled.

Bloodwood (n.) A tree having the wood or the sap of the color of blood.

Bloodwort (n.) A plant, Rumex sanguineus, or bloody-veined dock. The name is applied also to bloodroot (Sanguinaria Canadensis), and to an extensive order of plants (Haemodoraceae), the roots of many species of which contain a red coloring matter useful in dyeing.

Bloody (a.) Infamous; contemptible; -- variously used for mere emphasis or as a low epithet.

Bloody sweat () A sweat accompanied by a discharge of blood; a disease, called sweating sickness, formerly prevalent in England and other countries.

Bloom (n.) A blossom; the flower of a plant; an expanded bud; flowers, collectively.

Bloom (n.) The delicate, powdery coating upon certain growing or newly-gathered fruits or leaves, as on grapes, plums, etc. Hence: Anything giving an appearance of attractive freshness; a flush; a glow.

Bloom (n.) A yellowish deposit or powdery coating which appears on well-tanned leather.

Bloom (n.) A popular term for a bright-hued variety of some minerals; as, the rose-red cobalt bloom.

Bloomer (n.) A costume for women, consisting of a short dress, with loose trousers gathered round ankles, and (commonly) a broad-brimmed hat.

Bloomer (n.) A woman who wears a Bloomer costume.

Bloomingness (n.) A blooming condition.

Blossom (n.) The flower of a plant, or the essential organs of reproduction, with their appendages; florescence; bloom; the flowers of a plant, collectively; as, the blossoms and fruit of a tree; an apple tree in blossom.

Blossom (n.) The color of a horse that has white hairs intermixed with sorrel and bay hairs; -- otherwise called peach color.

Blotch (a.) A blot or spot, as of color or of ink; especially a large or irregular spot. Also Fig.; as, a moral blotch.

Blotch (a.) A large pustule, or a coarse eruption.

Blotched (a.) Marked or covered with blotches.

Blottesque (a.) Characterized by blots or heavy touches; coarsely depicted; wanting in delineation.

Blouse (n.) A light, loose over-garment, like a smock frock, worn especially by workingmen in France; also, a loose coat of any material, as the undress uniform coat of the United States army.

Blow (v. t.) To clear of contents by forcing air through; as, to blow an egg; to blow one's nose.

Blow (n.) A single heat or operation of the Bessemer converter.

Blowess (n.) A prostitute; a courtesan; a strumpet.

Blower (n.) The whale; -- so called by seamen, from the circumstance of its spouting up a column of water.

Blower (n.) A small fish of the Atlantic coast (Tetrodon turgidus); the puffer.

Blowhole (n.) A hole in the ice to which whales, seals, etc., come to breathe.

Blow-off (adj.) as, a blow-off cock or pipe.

Blowpipe (n.) A tube for directing a jet of air into a fire or into the flame of a lamp or candle, so as to concentrate the heat on some object.

Blowtube (n.) A similar instrument, commonly of tin, used by boys for discharging paper wads and other light missiles.

Blowzed (a.) Having high color from exposure to the weather; ruddy-faced; blowzy; disordered.

Blowzy (a.) Coarse and ruddy-faced; fat and ruddy; high colored; frowzy.

Blue (superl.) Having the color of the clear sky, or a hue resembling it, whether lighter or darker; as, the deep, blue sea; as blue as a sapphire; blue violets.

Blue (superl.) Pale, without redness or glare, -- said of a flame; hence, of the color of burning brimstone, betokening the presence of ghosts or devils; as, the candle burns blue; the air was blue with oaths.

Blue (n.) One of the seven colors into which the rays of light divide themselves, when refracted through a glass prism; the color of the clear sky, or a color resembling that, whether lighter or darker; a pigment having such color. Sometimes, poetically, the sky.

Blue (v. t.) To make blue; to dye of a blue color; to make blue by heating, as metals, etc.

Blueback (n.) A salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) of the Columbia River and northward.

Blueberry (n.) The berry of several species of Vaccinium, an ericaceous genus, differing from the American huckleberries in containing numerous minute seeds instead of ten nutlets. The commonest species are V. Pennsylvanicum and V. vacillans. V. corymbosum is the tall blueberry.

Bluebill (n.) A duck of the genus Fuligula. Two American species (F. marila and F. affinis) are common. See Scaup duck.

Bluebird (n.) A small song bird (Sialia sialis), very common in the United States, and, in the north, one of the earliest to arrive in spring. The male is blue, with the breast reddish. It is related to the European robin.

Blue-bonnet (n.) A broad, flat Scottish cap of blue woolen, or one wearing such cap; a Scotchman.

Blue-bonnet (n.) The European blue titmouse (Parus coeruleus); the bluecap.

Blue book () A parliamentary publication, so called from its blue paper covers.

Bluecap (n.) A Scot; a Scotchman; -- so named from wearing a blue bonnet.

Bluecoat (n.) One dressed in blue, as a soldier, a sailor, a beadle, etc.

Blue-eyed grass () a grasslike plant (Sisyrinchium anceps), with small flowers of a delicate blue color.

Bluefish (n.) A large voracious fish (Pomatomus saitatrix), of the family Carangidae, valued as a food fish, and widely distributed on the American coast. On the New Jersey and Rhode Island coast it is called the horse mackerel, in Virginia saltwater tailor, or skipjack.

Bluegown (n.) One of a class of paupers or pensioners, or licensed beggars, in Scotland, to whim annually on the king's birthday were distributed certain alms, including a blue gown; a beadsman.

Blue grass () A species of grass (Poa compressa) with bluish green stems, valuable in thin gravelly soils; wire grass.

Blue jay () The common jay of the United States (Cyanocitta, or Cyanura, cristata). The predominant color is bright blue.

Bluely (adv.) With a blue color.

Blueness (n.) The quality of being blue; a blue color.

Bluenose (n.) A nickname for a Nova Scotian.

Bluestone (n.) A grayish blue building stone, as that commonly used in the eastern United States.

Bluets (a.) A name given to several different species of plants having blue flowers, as the Houstonia coerulea, the Centaurea cyanus or bluebottle, and the Vaccinium angustifolium.

Bluff (n.) An act of bluffing; an expression of self-confidence for the purpose of intimidation; braggadocio; as, that is only bluff, or a bluff.

Bluff (v. t.) To frighten or deter from accomplishing a purpose by making a show of confidence in one's strength or resources; as, he bluffed me off.

Blunder (v. t.) To do or treat in a blundering manner; to confuse.

Bluntly (adv.) In a blunt manner; coarsely; plainly; abruptly; without delicacy, or the usual forms of civility.

Blur (v. t.) To render obscure by making the form or outline of confused and uncertain, as by soiling; to smear; to make indistinct and confused; as, to blur manuscript by handling it while damp; to blur the impression of a woodcut by an excess of ink.

Blur (n.) A dim, confused appearance; indistinctness of vision; as, to see things with a blur; it was all blur.

Blurt (v. t.) To utter suddenly and unadvisedly; to divulge inconsiderately; to ejaculate; -- commonly with out.

Blush (v. i.) To become suffused with red in the cheeks, as from a sense of shame, modesty, or confusion; to become red from such cause, as the cheeks or face.

Blush (v. i.) To grow red; to have a red or rosy color.

Blush (v. i.) To have a warm and delicate color, as some roses and other flowers.

Blush (n.) A suffusion of the cheeks or face with red, as from a sense of shame, confusion, or modesty.

Blush (n.) A red or reddish color; a rosy tint.

Blushing (a.) Showing blushes; rosy red; having a warm and delicate color like some roses and other flowers; blooming; ruddy; roseate.

Blushing (n.) The act of turning red; the appearance of a reddish color or flush upon the cheeks.

Blushingly (adv.) In a blushing manner; with a blush or blushes; as, to answer or confess blushingly.

Blushy (a.) Like a blush; having the color of a blush; rosy.

Boa (n.) A genus of large American serpents, including the boa constrictor, the emperor boa of Mexico (B. imperator), and the chevalier boa of Peru (B. eques).

Boa (n.) A long, round fur tippet; -- so called from its resemblance in shape to the boa constrictor.

Boa constrictor () A large and powerful serpent of tropical America, sometimes twenty or thirty feet long. See Illustration in Appendix.

Board (n.) A piece of timber sawed thin, and of considerable length and breadth as compared with the thickness, -- used for building, etc.

Board (n.) A table at which a council or court is held. Hence: A council, convened for business, or any authorized assembly or meeting, public or private; a number of persons appointed or elected to sit in council for the management or direction of some public or private business or trust; as, the Board of Admiralty; a board of trade; a board of directors, trustees, commissioners, etc.

Board (n.) Paper made thick and stiff like a board, for book covers, etc.; pasteboard; as, to bind a book in boards.

Board (v. t.) To cover with boards or boarding; as, to board a house.

Board (n.) To furnish with regular meals, or with meals and lodgings, for compensation; to supply with daily meals.

Board (n.) To place at board, for compensation; as, to board one's horse at a livery stable.

Board (v. i.) To obtain meals, or meals and lodgings, statedly for compensation; as, he boards at the hotel.

Board (v. t.) To approach; to accost; to address; hence, to woo.

Boarder (n.) One who has food statedly at another's table, or meals and lodgings in his house, for pay, or compensation of any kind.

Boarding (n.) The act of covering with boards; also, boards, collectively; or a covering made of boards.

Boarfish (n.) An Australian percoid fish (Histiopterus recurvirostris), valued as a food fish.

Boast (v. i.) To vaunt one's self; to brag; to say or tell things which are intended to give others a high opinion of one's self or of things belonging to one's self; as, to boast of one's exploits courage, descent, wealth.

Boast (v. t.) To display in ostentatious language; to speak of with pride, vanity, or exultation, with a view to self-commendation; to extol.

Boatage (n.) Conveyance by boat; also, a charge for such conveyance.

Boatbill (n.) A wading bird (Cancroma cochlearia) of the tropical parts of South America. Its bill is somewhat like a boat with the keel uppermost.

Boating (n.) In Persia, a punishment of capital offenders, by laying them on the back in a covered boat, where they are left to perish.

Boatswain (n.) An officer who has charge of the boats, sails, rigging, colors, anchors, cables, cordage, etc., of a ship, and who also summons the crew, and performs other duties.

Bob (n.) A small piece of cork or light wood attached to a fishing line to show when a fish is biting; a float.

Bobbin (n.) A small pin, or cylinder, formerly of bone, now most commonly of wood, used in the making of pillow lace. Each thread is wound on a separate bobbin which hangs down holding the thread at a slight tension.

Bobbin (n.) A spool or reel of various material and construction, with a head at one or both ends, and sometimes with a hole bored through its length by which it may be placed on a spindle or pivot. It is used to hold yarn or thread, as in spinning or warping machines, looms, sewing machines, etc.

Bobbin (n.) A fine cord or narrow braid.

Bobbin (n.) A cylindrical or spool-shaped coil or insulated wire, usually containing a core of soft iron which becomes magnetic when the wire is traversed by an electrical current.

Bobbinet (n.) A kind of cotton lace which is wrought by machines, and not by hand.

Bobolink (n.) An American singing bird (Dolichonyx oryzivorus). The male is black and white; the female is brown; -- called also, ricebird, reedbird, and Boblincoln.

Bobsleigh (n.) A short sled, mostly used as one of a pair connected by a reach or coupling; also, the compound sled so formed.

Bobstay (n.) A rope or chain to confine the bowsprit of a ship downward to the stem or cutwater; -- usually in the pl.

Bobtailed (a.) Having the tail cut short, or naturally short; curtailed; as, a bobtailed horse or dog; a bobtailed coat.

Bobwhite (n.) The common quail of North America (Colinus, or Ortyx, Virginianus); -- so called from its note.

Boce (n.) A European fish (Box vulgaris), having a compressed body and bright colors; -- called also box, and bogue.

Bocking (n.) A coarse woolen fabric, used for floor cloths, to cover carpets, etc.; -- so called from the town of Bocking, in England, where it was first made.

Bodice (n.) A kind of under waist stiffened with whalebone, etc., worn esp. by women; a corset; stays.

Bodied (a.) Having a body; -- usually in composition; as, able-bodied.

Bodiless (a.) Without material form; incorporeal.

Bodily (a.) Having a body or material form; physical; corporeal; consisting of matter.

Bodily (adv.) In respect to, or so as to affect, the entire body or mass; entirely; all at once; completely; as, to carry away bodily. "Leapt bodily below."

Bodkin (n.) A sharp tool, like an awl, used for picking /ut letters from a column or page in making corrections.

Bodle (n.) A small Scotch coin worth about one sixth of an English penny.

Body (n.) The trunk, or main part, of a person or animal, as distinguished from the limbs and head; the main, central, or principal part, as of a tree, army, country, etc.

Body (n.) A person; a human being; -- frequently in composition; as, anybody, nobody.

Body (n.) A number of individuals spoken of collectively, usually as united by some common tie, or as organized for some purpose; a collective whole or totality; a corporation; as, a legislative body; a clerical body.

Body (n.) A number of things or particulars embodied in a system; a general collection; as, a great body of facts; a body of laws or of divinity.

Body (n.) That part of a garment covering the body, as distinguished from the parts covering the limbs.

Body (n.) Consistency; thickness; substance; strength; as, this color has body; wine of a good body.

Boer (n.) A colonist or farmer in South Africa of Dutch descent.

Bogberry (n.) The small cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus), which grows in boggy places.

Boggy (a.) Consisting of, or containing, a bog or bogs; of the nature of a bog; swampy; as, boggy land.

Bogie (n.) A four-wheeled truck, having a certain amount of play around a vertical axis, used to support in part a locomotive on a railway track.

Bogsucker (n.) The American woodcock; -- so called from its feeding among the bogs.

Bogtrotter (n.) One who lives in a boggy country; -- applied in derision to the lowest class of Irish.

Bogus (a.) Spurious; fictitious; sham; -- a cant term originally applied to counterfeit coin, and hence denoting anything counterfeit.

Bogwood (n.) The wood of trees, esp. of oaks, dug up from peat bogs. It is of a shining black or ebony color, and is largely used for making ornaments.

Bohemia (n.) A country of central Europe.

Bohemia (n.) Fig.: The region or community of social Bohemians. See Bohemian, n., 3.

Bohemian (n.) Of or pertaining to a social gypsy or "Bohemian" (see Bohemian, n., 3); vagabond; unconventional; free and easy.

Bohemian (n.) A restless vagabond; -- originally, an idle stroller or gypsy (as in France) thought to have come from Bohemia; in later times often applied to an adventurer in art or literature, of irregular, unconventional habits, questionable tastes, or free morals.

Bohemianism (n.) The characteristic conduct or methods of a Bohemian.

Boil (v.) To be in boiling water, as in cooking; as, the potatoes are boiling.

Boil (v. t.) To subject to the action of heat in a boiling liquid so as to produce some specific effect, as cooking, cleansing, etc.; as, to boil meat; to boil clothes.

Boil (n.) A hard, painful, inflamed tumor, which, on suppuration, discharges pus, mixed with blood, and discloses a small fibrous mass of dead tissue, called the core.

Boiled (a.) Dressed or cooked by boiling; subjected to the action of a boiling liquid; as, boiled meat; a boiled dinner; boiled clothes.

Boiler (n.) A strong metallic vessel, usually of wrought iron plates riveted together, or a composite structure variously formed, in which steam is generated for driving engines, or for heating, cooking, or other purposes.

Bois durci () A hard, highly polishable composition, made of fine sawdust from hard wood (as rosewood) mixed with blood, and pressed.

Boistous (a.) Rough or rude; coarse; strong; violent; boisterous; noisy.

Bolas (n. sing. & pl.) A kind of missile weapon consisting of one, two, or more balls of stone, iron, or other material, attached to the ends of a leather cord; -- used by the Gauchos of South America, and others, for hurling at and entangling an animal.

Bold (n.) Forward to meet danger; venturesome; daring; not timorous or shrinking from risk; brave; courageous.

Bold (n.) Exhibiting or requiring spirit and contempt of danger; planned with courage; daring; vigorous.

Bold (n.) In a bad sense, too forward; taking undue liberties; over assuming or confident; lacking proper modesty or restraint; rude; impudent.

Bold (n.) Somewhat overstepping usual bounds, or conventional rules, as in art, literature, etc.; taking liberties in composition or expression; as, the figures of an author are bold.

Bold (n.) Standing prominently out to view; markedly conspicuous; striking the eye; in high relief.

Bold (v. i.) To be or become bold.

Bolden (v. t.) To make bold; to encourage; to embolden.

Bold-faced (a.) Having a conspicuous or heavy face.

Boldu (n.) A fragrant evergreen shrub of Chili (Peumus Boldus). The bark is used in tanning, the wood for making charcoal, the leaves in medicine, and the drupes are eaten.

Bole (n.) Any one of several varieties of friable earthy clay, usually colored more or less strongly red by oxide of iron, and used to color and adulterate various substances. It was formerly used in medicine. It is composed essentially of hydrous silicates of alumina, or more rarely of magnesia. See Clay, and Terra alba.

Bolero (n.) A Spanish dance, or the lively music which accompanies it.

Boletus (n.) A genus of fungi having the under side of the pileus or cap composed of a multitude of fine separate tubes. A few are edible, and others very poisonous.

Boll (n.) The pod or capsule of a plant, as of flax or cotton; a pericarp of a globular form.

Boll (n.) A Scotch measure, formerly in use: for wheat and beans it contained four Winchester bushels; for oats, barley, and potatoes, six bushels. A boll of meal is 140 lbs. avoirdupois. Also, a measure for salt of two bushels.

Bollworm (n.) The larva of a moth (Heliothis armigera) which devours the bolls or unripe pods of the cotton plant, often doing great damage to the crops.

Bolster (n.) A pad, quilt, or anything used to hinder pressure, support any part of the body, or make a bandage sit easy upon a wounded part; a compress.

Bolster (n.) A cushioned or a piece of soft wood covered with tarred canvas, placed on the trestletrees and against the mast, for the collars of the shrouds to rest on, to prevent chafing.

Bolt (n.) A compact package or roll of cloth, as of canvas or silk, often containing about forty yards.

Bolt (v. t.) To cause to start or spring forth; to dislodge, as conies, rabbits, etc.

Bolt (v. i.) To start forth like a bolt or arrow; to spring abruptly; to come or go suddenly; to dart; as, to bolt out of the room.

Bolt (v. i.) To refuse to support a nomination made by a party or a caucus with which one has been connected; to break away from a party.

Bolt (v. i.) A refusal to support a nomination made by the party with which one has been connected; a breaking away from one's party.

Bolt (v. t.) To sift or separate the coarser from the finer particles of, as bran from flour, by means of a bolter; to separate, assort, refine, or purify by other means.

Bolter (n.) An instrument or machine for separating bran from flour, or the coarser part of meal from the finer; a sieve.

Boltonite (n.) A granular mineral of a grayish or yellowish color, found in Bolton, Massachusetts. It is a silicate of magnesium, belonging to the chrysolite family.

Bombardier (n.) A noncommissioned officer in the British artillery.

Bombast (n.) Originally, cotton, or cotton wool.

Bombax (n.) A genus of trees, called also the silkcotton tree; also, a tree of the genus Bombax.

Bombazet Bombazette (n.) A sort of thin woolen cloth. It is of various colors, and may be plain or twilled.

Bombycinous (a.) Being of the color of the silkworm; transparent with a yellow tint.

Bon-accord (n.) Good will; good fellowship; agreement.

Bonair (a.) Gentle; courteous; complaisant; yielding.

Bonanza (n.) In mining, a rich mine or vein of silver or gold; hence, anything which is a mine of wealth or yields a large income.

Bona roba () A showy wanton; a courtesan.

Bonbon (n.) Sugar confectionery; a sugarplum; hence, any dainty.

Boncilate (n.) A substance composed of ground bone, mineral matters, etc., hardened by pressure, and used for making billiard balls, boxes, etc.

Bond (n.) That which binds, ties, fastens, or confines, or by which anything is fastened or bound, as a cord, chain, etc.; a band; a ligament; a shackle or a manacle.

Bond (n.) A writing under seal, by which a person binds himself, his heirs, executors, and administrators, to pay a certain sum on or before a future day appointed. This is a single bond. But usually a condition is added, that, if the obligor shall do a certain act, appear at a certain place, conform to certain rules, faithfully perform certain duties, or pay a certain sum of money, on or before a time specified, the obligation shall be void; otherwise it shall remain in full force. If the condition is not performed, the bond becomes forfeited, and the obligor and his heirs are liable to the payment of the whole sum.

Bond (n.) An instrument (of the nature of the ordinary legal bond) made by a government or a corporation for purpose of borrowing money; as, a government, city, or railway bond.

Bond (n.) The union or tie of the several stones or bricks forming a wall. The bricks may be arranged for this purpose in several different ways, as in English or block bond (Fig. 1), where one course consists of bricks with their ends toward the face of the wall, called headers, and the next course of bricks with their lengths parallel to the face of the wall, called stretchers; Flemish bond (Fig.2), where each course consists of headers and stretchers alternately, so laid as always to break joints; Cross bond, which differs from the English by the change of the second stretcher line so that its joints come in the middle of the first, and the same position of stretchers comes back every fifth line; Combined cross and English bond, where the inner part of the wall is laid in the one method, the outer in the other.

Bond (v. t.) To place under the conditions of a bond; to mortgage; to secure the payment of the duties on (goods or merchandise) by giving a bond.

Bondage (a.) The state of being bound; condition of being under restraint; restraint of personal liberty by compulsion; involuntary servitude; slavery; captivity.

Bondage (a.) Villenage; tenure of land on condition of doing the meanest services for the owner.

Bonded (a.) Placed under, or covered by, a bond, as for the payment of duties, or for conformity to certain regulations.

Bondholder (n.) A person who holds the bonds of a public or private corporation for the payment of money at a certain time.

Bond service () The condition of a bond servant; service without wages; slavery.

Bone (n.) The hard, calcified tissue of the skeleton of vertebrate animals, consisting very largely of calcic carbonate, calcic phosphate, and gelatine; as, blood and bone.

Bone (n.) Whalebone; hence, a piece of whalebone or of steel for a corset.

Bone (v. t.) To withdraw bones from the flesh of, as in cookery.

Boned (a.) Having (such) bones; -- used in composition; as, big-boned; strong-boned.

Boned (a.) Deprived of bones; as, boned turkey or codfish.

Bonesetter (n.) One who sets broken or dislocated bones; -- commonly applied to one, not a regular surgeon, who makes an occupation of setting bones.

Bongrace (n.) A projecting bonnet or shade to protect the complexion; also, a wide-brimmed hat.

Bonify (v. t.) To convert into, or make, good.

Boniness (n.) The condition or quality of being bony.

Bonito (n.) A large tropical fish (Orcynus pelamys) allied to the tunny. It is about three feet long, blue above, with four brown stripes on the sides. It is sometimes found on the American coast.

Bonito (n.) The skipjack (Sarda Mediterranea) of the Atlantic, an important and abundant food fish on the coast of the United States, and (S. Chilensis) of the Pacific, and other related species. They are large and active fishes, of a blue color with black oblique stripes.

Bonito (n.) The cobia or crab eater (Elacate canada), an edible fish of the Middle and Southern United States.

Bonnet (n.) A soft, elastic, very durable cap, made of thick, seamless woolen stuff, and worn by men in Scotland.

Bonnet (n.) A covering for the head, worn by women, usually protecting more or less the back and sides of the head, but no part of the forehead. The shape of the bonnet varies greatly at different times; formerly the front part projected, and spread outward, like the mouth of a funnel.

Bonnet (n.) A metallic canopy, or projection, over an opening, as a fireplace, or a cowl or hood to increase the draught of a chimney, etc.

Bonnet (n.) A frame of wire netting over a locomotive chimney, to prevent escape of sparks.

Bonnet (n.) In pumps, a metal covering for the openings in the valve chambers.

Bonnet (n.) The second stomach of a ruminating animal.

Bonnet (n.) An accomplice of a gambler, auctioneer, etc., who entices others to bet or to bid; a decoy.

Bonnet (v. i.) To take off the bonnet or cap as a mark of respect; to uncover.

Bonny (n.) A round and compact bed of ore, or a distinct bed, not communicating with a vein.

Bonus (n.) A premium given for a loan, or for a charter or other privilege granted to a company; as the bank paid a bonus for its charter.

Bonus (n.) An extra dividend to the shareholders of a joint stock company, out of accumulated profits.

Bonus (n.) Money paid in addition to a stated compensation.

Bon vivant (p. pr.) A good fellow; a jovial companion; a free liver.

Booby (n.) A swimming bird (Sula fiber or S. sula) related to the common gannet, and found in the West Indies, nesting on the bare rocks. It is so called on account of its apparent stupidity. The name is also sometimes applied to other species of gannets; as, S. piscator, the red-footed booby.

Boodle (n.) The whole collection or lot; caboodle.

Book (n.) A collection of sheets of paper, or similar material, blank, written, or printed, bound together; commonly, many folded and bound sheets containing continuous printing or writing.

Book (n.) A composition, written or printed; a treatise.

Book (n.) A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, etc.

Book (n.) Six tricks taken by one side, in the game of whist; in certain other games, two or more corresponding cards, forming a set.

Book (v. t.) To enter the name of (any one) in a book for the purpose of securing a passage, conveyance, or seat; as, to be booked for Southampton; to book a seat in a theater.

Booker (n.) One who enters accounts or names, etc., in a book; a bookkeeper.

Bookholder (n.) A support for a book, holding it open, while one reads or copies from it.

Booking clerk () A clerk who registers passengers, baggage, etc., for conveyance, as by railway or steamship, or who sells passage tickets at a booking office.

Booking office () An office where passengers, baggage, etc., are registered for conveyance, as by railway or steamship.

Bookkeeper (n.) One who keeps accounts; one who has the charge of keeping the books and accounts in an office.

Bookkeeping (n.) The art of recording pecuniary or business transactions in a regular and systematic manner, so as to show their relation to each other, and the state of the business in which they occur; the art of keeping accounts. The books commonly used are a daybook, cashbook, journal, and ledger. See Daybook, Cashbook, Journal, and Ledger.

Bookmaker (n.) One who writes and publishes books; especially, one who gathers his materials from other books; a compiler.

Book muslin () A kind of muslin used for the covers of books.

Booly (n.) A company of Irish herdsmen, or a single herdsman, wandering from place to place with flocks and herds, and living on their milk, like the Tartars; also, a place in the mountain pastures inclosed for the shelter of cattle or their keepers.

Boom (n.) A pole with a conspicuous top, set up to mark the channel in a river or harbor.

Boom (n.) A line of connected floating timbers stretched across a river, or inclosing an area of water, to keep saw logs, etc., from floating away.

Boom (n.) A strong and extensive advance, with more or less noisy excitement; -- applied colloquially or humorously to market prices, the demand for stocks or commodities and to political chances of aspirants to office; as, a boom in the stock market; a boom in coffee.

Boomdas (n.) A small African hyracoid mammal (Dendrohyrax arboreus) resembling the daman.

Boomerang (n.) A very singular missile weapon used by the natives of Australia and in some parts of India. It is usually a curved stick of hard wood, from twenty to thirty inches in length, from two to three inches wide, and half or three quarters of an inch thick. When thrown from the hand with a quick rotary motion, it describes very remarkable curves, according to the shape of the instrument and the manner of throwing it, often moving nearly horizontally a long distance, then curving upward to a considerable height, and finally taking a retrograde direction, so as to fall near the place from which it was thrown, or even far in the rear of it.

Boomslange (n.) A large South African tree snake (Bucephalus Capensis). Although considered venomous by natives, it has no poison fangs.

Boon (n.) Gay; merry; jovial; convivial.

Boor (n.) A husbandman; a peasant; a rustic; esp. a clownish or unrefined countryman.

Boor (n.) A Dutch, German, or Russian peasant; esp. a Dutch colonist in South Africa, Guiana, etc.: a boer.

Boose (n.) A stall or a crib for an ox, cow, or other animal.

Boost (v. i.) To lift or push from behind (one who is endeavoring to climb); to push up; hence, to assist in overcoming obstacles, or in making advancement.

Boot (n.) A covering for the foot and lower part of the leg, ordinarily made of leather.

Boot (n.) An instrument of torture for the leg, formerly used to extort confessions, particularly in Scotland.

Boot (n.) A place at the side of a coach, where attendants rode; also, a low outside place before and behind the body of the coach.

Boot (n.) A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach.

Boot (n.) An apron or cover (of leather or rubber cloth) for the driving seat of a vehicle, to protect from rain and mud.

Booted (a.) Having an undivided, horny, bootlike covering; -- said of the tarsus of some birds.

Bootes (n.) A northern constellation, containing the bright star Arcturus.

Booth (n.) A covered stall or temporary structure in a fair or market, or at a polling place.

Bootikin (n.) A covering for the foot or hand, worn as a cure for the gout.

Boottree (n.) An instrument to stretch and widen the leg of a boot, consisting of two pieces, together shaped like a leg, between which, when put into the boot, a wedge is driven.

Booty (n.) That which is seized by violence or obtained by robbery, especially collective spoil taken in war; plunder; pillage.

Booze (v. i.) To drink greedily or immoderately, esp. alcoholic liquor; to tipple.

Boozer (n.) One who boozes; a toper; a guzzler of alcoholic liquors; a bouser.

Boracic (a.) Pertaining to, or produced from, borax; containing boron; boric; as, boracic acid.

Boracite (n.) A mineral of a white or gray color occurring massive and in isometric crystals; in composition it is a magnesium borate with magnesium chloride.

Boracous (a.) Relating to, or obtained from, borax; containing borax.

Borate (n.) A salt formed by the combination of boric acid with a base or positive radical.

Borax (n.) A white or gray crystalline salt, with a slight alkaline taste, used as a flux, in soldering metals, making enamels, fixing colors on porcelain, and as a soap. It occurs native in certain mineral springs, and is made from the boric acid of hot springs in Tuscany. It was originally obtained from a lake in Thibet, and was sent to Europe under the name of tincal. Borax is a pyroborate or tetraborate of sodium, Na2B4O7.10H2O.

Bord (n.) The face of coal parallel to the natural fissures.

Bordage (n.) The base or servile tenure by which a bordar held his cottage.

Bordar (n.) A villein who rendered menial service for his cottage; a cottier.

Border (n.) A boundary; a frontier of a state or of the settled part of a country; a frontier district.

Border (v. i.) To touch at the edge or boundary; to be contiguous or adjacent; -- with on or upon as, Connecticut borders on Massachusetts.

Border (v. i.) To approach; to come near to; to verge.

Border (v. t.) To be, or to have, contiguous to; to touch, or be touched, as by a border; to be, or to have, near the limits or boundary; as, the region borders a forest, or is bordered on the north by a forest.

Border (v. t.) To confine within bounds; to limit.

Borderer (n.) One who dwells on a border, or at the extreme part or confines of a country, region, or tract of land; one who dwells near to a place or region.

Bordraging (n.) An incursion upon the borders of a country; a raid.

Bore (n.) A tidal flood which regularly or occasionally rushes into certain rivers of peculiar configuration or location, in one or more waves which present a very abrupt front of considerable height, dangerous to shipping, as at the mouth of the Amazon, in South America, the Hoogly and Indus, in India, and the Tsien-tang, in China.

Borecole (n.) A brassicaceous plant of many varieties, cultivated for its leaves, which are not formed into a compact head like the cabbage, but are loose, and are generally curled or wrinkled; kale.

Boredom (n.) The realm of bores; bores, collectively.

Borele (n.) The smaller two-horned rhinoceros of South Africa (Atelodus bicornis).

Boric (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, boron.

Boride (n.) A binary compound of boron with a more positive or basic element or radical; -- formerly called boruret.

Borne (p. p.) Carried; conveyed; supported; defrayed. See Bear, v. t.

Borneol (n.) A rare variety of camphor, C10H17.OH, resembling ordinary camphor, from which it can be produced by reduction. It is said to occur in the camphor tree of Borneo and Sumatra (Dryobalanops camphora), but the natural borneol is rarely found in European or American commerce, being in great request by the Chinese. Called also Borneo camphor, Malay camphor, and camphol.

Bornite (n.) A valuable ore of copper, containing copper, iron, and sulphur; -- also called purple copper ore (or erubescite), in allusion to the colors shown upon the slightly tarnished surface.

Boroglyceride (n.) A compound of boric acid and glycerin, used as an antiseptic.

Boron (n.) A nonmetallic element occurring abundantly in borax. It is reduced with difficulty to the free state, when it can be obtained in several different forms; viz., as a substance of a deep olive color, in a semimetallic form, and in colorless quadratic crystals similar to the diamond in hardness and other properties. It occurs in nature also in boracite, datolite, tourmaline, and some other minerals. Atomic weight 10.9. Symbol B.

Borough (n.) In England, an incorporated town that is not a city; also, a town that sends members to parliament; in Scotland, a body corporate, consisting of the inhabitants of a certain district, erected by the sovereign, with a certain jurisdiction; in America, an incorporated town or village, as in Pennsylvania and Connecticut.

Borough (n.) The collective body of citizens or inhabitants of a borough; as, the borough voted to lay a tax.

Borrel (n.) Coarse woolen cloth; hence, coarse clothing; a garment.

Borrow (v. t.) To take (one or more) from the next higher denomination in order to add it to the next lower; -- a term of subtraction when the figure of the subtrahend is larger than the corresponding one of the minuend.

Borrow (v. t.) To copy or imitate; to adopt; as, to borrow the style, manner, or opinions of another.

Borrow (v. t.) To feign or counterfeit.

Borsholder (a.) The head or chief of a tithing, or borough (see 2d Borough); the headborough; a parish constable.

Bort (n.) Imperfectly crystallized or coarse diamonds, or fragments made in cutting good diamonds which are reduced to powder and used in lapidary work.

Bosh (n.) Empty talk; contemptible nonsense; trash; humbug.

Bosh (n.) In forging and smelting, a trough in which tools and ingots are cooled.

Bosky (a.) Woody or bushy; covered with boscage or thickets.

Bosom (n.) The breast, considered as the seat of the passions, affections, and operations of the mind; consciousness; secret thoughts.

Bosom (a.) Intimate; confidential; familiar; trusted; cherished; beloved; as, a bosom friend.

Bosom (v. t.) To conceal; to hide from view; to embosom.

Boss (n.) The enlarged part of a shaft, on which a wheel is keyed, or at the end, where it is coupled to another.

Bossage (n.) Rustic work, consisting of stones which seem to advance beyond the level of the building, by reason of indentures or channels left in the joinings.

Bossy (n.) A cow or calf; -- familiarly so called.

Botany Bay () A harbor on the east coast of Australia, and an English convict settlement there; -- so called from the number of new plants found on its shore at its discovery by Cook in 1770.

Botargo (n.) A sort of cake or sausage, made of the salted roes of the mullet, much used on the coast of the Mediterranean as an incentive to drink.

Botcher (n.) One who mends or patches, esp. a tailor or cobbler.

Bote (n.) Compensation; amends; satisfaction; expiation; as, man bote, a compensation or a man slain.

Botfly (n.) A dipterous insect of the family (Estridae, of many different species, some of which are particularly troublesome to domestic animals, as the horse, ox, and sheep, on which they deposit their eggs. A common species is one of the botflies of the horse (Gastrophilus equi), the larvae of which (bots) are taken into the stomach of the animal, where they live several months and pass through their larval states. In tropical America one species sometimes lives under the human skin, and another in the stomach. See Gadfly.

Both (conj.) As well; not only; equally.

Bothnic (a.) Of or pertaining to Bothnia, a country of northern Europe, or to a gulf of the same name which forms the northern part of the Baltic sea.

Boothy (n.) A wooden hut or humble cot, esp. a rude hut or barrack for unmarried farm servants; a shepherd's or hunter's hut; a booth.

Bo tree () The peepul tree; esp., the very ancient tree standing at Anurajahpoora in Ceylon, grown from a slip of the tree under which Gautama is said to have received the heavenly light and so to have become Buddha.

Botryogen (n.) A hydrous sulphate of iron of a deep red color. It often occurs in botryoidal form.

Bottine (n.) An appliance resembling a small boot furnished with straps, buckles, etc., used to correct or prevent distortions in the lower extremities of children.

Bottle (n.) The contents of a bottle; as much as a bottle contains; as, to drink a bottle of wine.

Bottleholder (n.) One who assists or supports another in a contest; an abettor; a backer.

Bottle-nose (n.) A cetacean of the Dolphin family, of several species, as Delphinus Tursio and Lagenorhyncus leucopleurus, of Europe.

Bottlescrew (n.) A corkscrew.

Bottling (n.) The act or the process of putting anything into bottles (as beer, mineral water, etc.) and corking the bottles.

Bottom (n.) The part of anything which is beneath the contents and supports them, as the part of a chair on which a person sits, the circular base or lower head of a cask or tub, or the plank floor of a ship's hold; the under surface.

Bottom (v. i.) To reach or impinge against the bottom, so as to impede free action, as when the point of a cog strikes the bottom of a space between two other cogs, or a piston the end of a cylinder.

Bottom (n.) A ball or skein of thread; a cocoon.

Bottomed (a.) Having at the bottom, or as a bottom; resting upon a bottom; grounded; -- mostly, in composition; as, sharp-bottomed; well-bottomed.

Bottomry (n.) A contract in the nature of a mortgage, by which the owner of a ship, or the master as his agent, hypothecates and binds the ship (and sometimes the accruing freight) as security for the repayment of money advanced or lent for the use of the ship, if she terminates her voyage successfully. If the ship is lost by perils of the sea, the lender loses the money; but if the ship arrives safe, he is to receive the money lent, with the interest or premium stipulated, although it may, and usually does, exceed the legal rate of interest. See Hypothecation.

Bouch (n.) An allowance of meat and drink for the tables of inferior officers or servants in a nobleman's palace or at court.

Bought (n.) A flexure; a bend; a twist; a turn; a coil, as in a rope; as the boughts of a serpent.

Bought (n.) The part of a sling that contains the stone.

Bougie (n.) A long slender rod consisting of gelatin or some other substance that melts at the temperature of the body. It is impregnated with medicine, and designed for introduction into urethra, etc.

Boulangerite (n.) A mineral of a bluish gray color and metallic luster, usually in plumose masses, also compact. It is a sulphide of antimony and lead.

Boultin (n.) A molding, the convexity of which is one fourth of a circle, being a member just below the abacus in the Tuscan and Roman Doric capital; a torus; an ovolo.

Boultin (n.) One of the shafts of a clustered column.

Bounce (v. t.) To bully; to scold.

Bound (n.) The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary.

Bound (v. t.) To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; -- said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine.

Bound (p. p. & a.) Inclosed in a binding or cover; as, a bound volume.

Bound (p. p. & a.) Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; -- followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail.

Bound (p. p. & a.) Constipated; costive.

Boundless (a.) Without bounds or confines; illimitable; vast; unlimited.

Bounty (n.) A premium offered or given to induce men to enlist into the public service; or to encourage any branch of industry, as husbandry or manufactures.

Bour (n.) A chamber or a cottage.

Bourbon (n.) A politician who is behind the age; a ruler or politician who neither forgets nor learns anything; an obstinate conservative.

Bourbonism (n.) The principles of those adhering to the house of Bourbon; obstinate conservatism.

Bourgeoisie (n.) The French middle class, particularly such as are concerned in, or dependent on, trade.

Bournonite (n.) A mineral of a steel-gray to black color and metallic luster, occurring crystallized, often in twin crystals shaped like cogwheels (wheel ore), also massive. It is a sulphide of antimony, lead, and copper.

Bourree (n.) An old French dance tune in common time.

Bouse (n.) Drink, esp. alcoholic drink; also, a carouse; a booze.

Bout (n.) A conflict; contest; attempt; trial; a set-to at anything; as, a fencing bout; a drinking bout.

Bovey coal () A kind of mineral coal, or brown lignite, burning with a weak flame, and generally a disagreeable odor; -- found at Bovey Tracey, Devonshire, England. It is of geological age of the oolite, and not of the true coal era.

Bovine (a.) Of or pertaining to the genus Bos; relating to, or resembling, the ox or cow; oxlike; as, the bovine genus; a bovine antelope.

Bovine (a.) Having qualities characteristic of oxen or cows; sluggish and patient; dull; as, a bovine temperament.

Bow (v. t.) To exercise powerful or controlling influence over; to bend, figuratively; to turn; to incline.

Bow (v. t.) To bend or incline, as the head or body, in token of respect, gratitude, assent, homage, or condescension.

Bow (v. t.) A weapon made of a strip of wood, or other elastic material, with a cord connecting the two ends, by means of which an arrow is propelled.

Bow (v. t.) An appliance consisting of an elastic rod, with a number of horse hairs stretched from end to end of it, used in playing on a stringed instrument.

Bow (v. t.) An arcograph.

Bow (v. t.) Any instrument consisting of an elastic rod, with ends connected by a string, employed for giving reciprocating motion to a drill, or for preparing and arranging the hair, fur, etc., used by hatters.

Bowbell (n.) One born within hearing distance of Bow-bells; a cockney.

Bow-bells (n. pl.) The bells of Bow Church in London; cockneydom.

Bow-compasses (pl. ) of Bow-compass

Bow-compass (n.) An arcograph.

Bow-compass (n.) A small pair of compasses, one leg of which carries a pencil, or a pen, for drawing circles. Its legs are often connected by a bow-shaped spring, instead of by a joint.

Bow-compass (n.) A pair of compasses, with a bow or arched plate riveted to one of the legs, and passing through the other.

Bowel (n.) The seat of pity or kindness. Hence: Tenderness; compassion.

Bowenite (n.) A hard, compact variety of serpentine found in Rhode Island. It is of a light green color and resembles jade.

Bower (n.) One of the two highest cards in the pack commonly used in the game of euchre.

Bower (n.) A rustic cottage or abode; poetically, an attractive abode or retreat.

Bower (n.) A shelter or covered place in a garden, made with boughs of trees or vines, etc., twined together; an arbor; a shady recess.

Bower bird () An Australian bird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus / holosericeus), allied to the starling, which constructs singular bowers or playhouses of twigs and decorates them with bright-colored objects; the satin bird.

Bowl (n.) A concave vessel of various forms (often approximately hemispherical), to hold liquids, etc.

Bowl (n.) Specifically, a drinking vessel for wine or other spirituous liquors; hence, convivial drinking.

Bowl (n.) The contents of a full bowl; what a bowl will hold.

Bow-pen (n.) Bow-compasses carrying a drawing pen. See Bow-compass.

Bow-pencil (n.) Bow-compasses, one leg of which carries a pencil.

Box (n.) A tree or shrub, flourishing in different parts of the world. The common box (Buxus sempervirens) has two varieties, one of which, the dwarf box (B. suffruticosa), is much used for borders in gardens. The wood of the tree varieties, being very hard and smooth, is extensively used in the arts, as by turners, engravers, mathematical instrument makers, etc.

Box (n.) The quantity that a box contain.

Box (n.) A chest or any receptacle for the deposit of money; as, a poor box; a contribution box.

Box (n.) A small country house.

Box (n.) The driver's seat on a carriage or coach.

Box (v. i.) To fight with the fist; to combat with, or as with, the hand or fist; to spar.

Boxing (n.) The act of fighting with the fist; a combat with the fist; sparring.

Box-iron (n.) A hollow smoothing iron containing a heater within.

Boyau (n.) A winding or zigzag trench forming a path or communication from one siegework to another, to a magazine, etc.

Boycotted (imp. & p. p.) of Boycott

Boycotting (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Boycott

Boycott (v. t.) To combine against (a landlord, tradesman, employer, or other person), to withhold social or business relations from him, and to deter others from holding such relations; to subject to a boycott.

Boycott (n.) The process, fact, or pressure of boycotting; a combining to withhold or prevent dealing or social intercourse with a tradesman, employer, etc.; social and business interdiction for the purpose of coercion.

Boycotter (n.) A participant in boycotting.

Boycottism (n.) Methods of boycotters.

Brabble (v. i.) To clamor; to contest noisily.

Brabble (n.) A broil; a noisy contest; a wrangle.

Braccate (a.) Furnished with feathers which conceal the feet.

Brace (n.) A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension, as a cord on the side of a drum.

Brace (n.) A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.

Brace (n.) A vertical curved line connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be taken together; thus, boll, bowl; or, in music, used to connect staves.

Brace (n.) A pair; a couple; as, a brace of ducks; now rarely applied to persons, except familiarly or with some contempt.

Bracer (n.) A covering to protect the arm of the bowman from the vibration of the string; also, a brassart.

Brachiopoda (n.) A class of Molluscoidea having a symmetrical bivalve shell, often attached by a fleshy peduncle.

Brachycephalism (n.) The state or condition of being brachycephalic; shortness of head.

Brachypinacoid (n.) A plane of an orthorhombic crystal which is parallel both to the vertical axis and to the shorter lateral (brachydiagonal) axis.

Brachystochrone (n.) A curve, in which a body, starting from a given point, and descending solely by the force of gravity, will reach another given point in a shorter time than it could by any other path. This curve of quickest descent, as it is sometimes called, is, in a vacuum, the same as the cycloid.

Brachyura (n. pl.) A group of decapod Crustacea, including the common crabs, characterized by a small and short abdomen, which is bent up beneath the large cephalo-thorax. [Also spelt Brachyoura.] See Crab, and Illustration in Appendix.

Bracing (n.) Any system of braces; braces, collectively; as, the bracing of a truss.

Bracket (n.) An architectural member, plain or ornamental, projecting from a wall or pier, to support weight falling outside of the same; also, a decorative feature seeming to discharge such an office.

Bracket (n.) A piece or combination of pieces, usually triangular in general shape, projecting from, or fastened to, a wall, or other surface, to support heavy bodies or to strengthen angles.

Bracket (n.) A gas fixture or lamp holder projecting from the face of a wall, column, or the like.

Bracket (v. t.) To place within brackets; to connect by brackets; to furnish with brackets.

Bracketing (n.) A series or group of brackets; brackets, collectively.

Brad (n.) A thin nail, usually small, with a slight projection at the top on one side instead of a head; also, a small wire nail, with a flat circular head; sometimes, a small, tapering, square-bodied finishing nail, with a countersunk head.

Brag (v. i.) To talk about one's self, or things pertaining to one's self, in a manner intended to excite admiration, envy, or wonder; to talk boastfully; to boast; -- often followed by of; as, to brag of one's exploits, courage, or money, or of the great things one intends to do.

Brag (v. i.) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.

Brahma (n.) The One First Cause; also, one of the triad of Hindoo gods. The triad consists of Brahma, the Creator, Vishnu, the Preserver, and Siva, the Destroyer.

Brahma (n.) A valuable variety of large, domestic fowl, peculiar in having the comb divided lengthwise into three parts, and the legs well feathered. There are two breeds, the dark or penciled, and the light; -- called also Brahmapootra.

Braid (v. t.) To mingle, or to bring to a uniformly soft consistence, by beating, rubbing, or straining, as in some culinary operations.

Braiding (n.) Braids, collectively; trimming.

Brail (n.) Ropes passing through pulleys, and used to haul in or up the leeches, bottoms, or corners of sails, preparatory to furling.

Brain (n.) The whitish mass of soft matter (the center of the nervous system, and the seat of consciousness and volition) which is inclosed in the cartilaginous or bony cranium of vertebrate animals. It is simply the anterior termination of the spinal cord, and is developed from three embryonic vesicles, whose cavities are connected with the central canal of the cord; the cavities of the vesicles become the central cavities, or ventricles, and the walls thicken unequally and become the three segments, the fore-, mid-, and hind-brain.

Brain (v. t.) To conceive; to understand.

Braize (n.) Charcoal powder; breeze.

Braise (v. t.) To stew or broil in a covered kettle or pan.

Brake (n.) A fern of the genus Pteris, esp. the P. aquilina, common in almost all countries. It has solitary stems dividing into three principal branches. Less properly: Any fern.

Brake (v. t.) A frame for confining a refractory horse while the smith is shoeing him; also, an inclosure to restrain cattle, horses, etc.

Brake (v. t.) An apparatus for testing the power of a steam engine, or other motor, by weighing the amount of friction that the motor will overcome; a friction brake.

Bramble bush () The bramble, or a collection of brambles growing together.

Bran (n.) The broken coat of the seed of wheat, rye, or other cereal grain, separated from the flour or meal by sifting or bolting; the coarse, chaffy part of ground grain.

Branch (n.) A shoot or secondary stem growing from the main stem, or from a principal limb or bough of a tree or other plant.

Branch (n.) Any division extending like a branch; any arm or part connected with the main body of thing; ramification; as, the branch of an antler; the branch of a chandelier; a branch of a river; a branch of a railway.

Branch (n.) A warrant or commission given to a pilot, authorizing him to pilot vessels in certain waters.

Branchia (n.) A gill; a respiratory organ for breathing the air contained in water, such as many aquatic and semiaquatic animals have.

Branchiostegal (a.) Pertaining to the membrane covering the gills of fishes.

Branch pilot () A pilot who has a branch or commission, as from Trinity House, England, for special navigation.

Branchy (a.) Full of branches; having wide-spreading branches; consisting of branches.

Brand (v. t.) A mark made by burning with a hot iron, as upon a cask, to designate the quality, manufacturer, etc., of the contents, or upon an animal, to designate ownership; -- also, a mark for a similar purpose made in any other way, as with a stencil. Hence, figurately: Quality; kind; grade; as, a good brand of flour.

Brand (v. t.) To burn a distinctive mark into or upon with a hot iron, to indicate quality, ownership, etc., or to mark as infamous (as a convict).

Brand (v. t.) To put an actual distinctive mark upon in any other way, as with a stencil, to show quality of contents, name of manufacture, etc.

Brandy (n.) A strong alcoholic liquor distilled from wine. The name is also given to spirit distilled from other liquors, and in the United States to that distilled from cider and peaches. In northern Europe, it is also applied to a spirit obtained from grain.

Brangle (n.) A wrangle; a squabble; a noisy contest or dispute.

Brangle (v. i.) To wrangle; to dispute contentiously; to squabble.

Branks (n.) A scolding bridle, an instrument formerly used for correcting scolding women. It was an iron frame surrounding the head and having a triangular piece entering the mouth of the scold.

Branlin (n.) A small red worm or larva, used as bait for small fresh-water fish; -- so called from its red color.

Branny (a.) Having the appearance of bran; consisting of or containing bran.

Brantail (n.) The European redstart; -- so called from the red color of its tail.

Brant-fox (n.) A kind of fox found in Sweden (Vulpes alopex), smaller than the common fox (V. vulgaris), but probably a variety of it.

Brazier (n.) A pan for holding burning coals.

Brass (n.) An alloy (usually yellow) of copper and zinc, in variable proportion, but often containing two parts of copper to one part of zinc. It sometimes contains tin, and rarely other metals.

Brass (n.) Coin made of copper, brass, or bronze.

Brass (n.) A brass plate engraved with a figure or device. Specifically, one used as a memorial to the dead, and generally having the portrait, coat of arms, etc.

Brass (n.) Lumps of pyrites or sulphuret of iron, the color of which is near to that of brass.

Brassage (n.) A sum formerly levied to pay the expense of coinage; -- now called seigniorage.

Brassart (n.) Armor for the arm; -- generally used for the whole arm from the shoulder to the wrist, and consisting, in the 15th and 16th centuries, of many parts.

Brassica (n.) A genus of plants embracing several species and varieties differing much in appearance and qualities: such as the common cabbage (B. oleracea), broccoli, cauliflowers, etc.; the wild turnip (B. campestris); the common turnip (B. rapa); the rape or coleseed (B. napus), etc.

Brassiness (n.) The state, condition, or quality of being brassy.

Brat (n.) A coarse garment or cloak; also, coarse clothing, in general.

Brat (n.) A coarse kind of apron for keeping the clothes clean; a bib.

Brat (n.) A child; an offspring; -- formerly used in a good sense, but now usually in a contemptuous sense.

Brat (n.) A thin bed of coal mixed with pyrites or carbonate of lime.

Braunite (n.) A native oxide of manganese, of dark brownish black color. It was named from a Mr. Braun of Gotha.

Brave (superl.) Bold; courageous; daring; intrepid; -- opposed to cowardly; as, a brave man; a brave act.

Brave (superl.) Having any sort of superiority or excellence; -- especially such as in conspicuous.

Brave (v. t.) To encounter with courage and fortitude; to set at defiance; to defy; to dare.

Bravely (adv.) In a brave manner; courageously; gallantly; valiantly; splendidly; nobly.

Brawl (v. i.) To complain loudly; to scold.

Brawl (v. i.) To make a loud confused noise, as the water of a rapid stream running over stones.

Brawl (n.) A noisy quarrel; loud, angry contention; a wrangle; a tumult; as, a drunken brawl.

Brawling (a.) Making a loud confused noise. See Brawl, v. i., 3.

Bray (v. i.) To make a harsh, grating, or discordant noise.

Bray (v. t.) To make or utter with a loud, discordant, or harsh and grating sound.

Bray (n.) The harsh cry of an ass; also, any harsh, grating, or discordant sound.

Braze (v. i.) To solder with hard solder, esp. with an alloy of copper and zinc; as, to braze the seams of a copper pipe.

Braze (v. t.) To cover or ornament with brass.

Brazen (a.) Impudent; immodest; shameless; having a front like brass; as, a brazen countenance.

Brazilin (n.) A substance contained in both Brazil wood and Sapan wood, from which it is extracted as a yellow crystalline substance which is white when pure. It is colored intensely red by alkalies.

Brazil wood () The wood of the oriental Caesalpinia Sapan; -- so called before the discovery of America.

Brazil wood () A very heavy wood of a reddish color, imported from Brazil and other tropical countries, for cabinet-work, and for dyeing. The best is the heartwood of Caesalpinia echinata, a leguminous tree; but other trees also yield it. An inferior sort comes from Jamaica, the timber of C. Braziliensis and C. crista. This is often distinguished as Braziletto , but the better kind is also frequently so named.

Breach (n.) Specifically: A breaking or infraction of a law, or of any obligation or tie; violation; non-fulfillment; as, a breach of contract; a breach of promise.

Bread (v. t.) To cover with bread crumbs, preparatory to cooking; as, breaded cutlets.

Breadcorn () Corn of grain of which bread is made, as wheat, rye, etc.

Breadfruit (n.) The tree itself, which is one of considerable size, with large, lobed leaves. Cloth is made from the bark, and the timber is used for many purposes. Called also breadfruit tree and bread tree.

Break (v. t.) To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with violence; as, to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or coal; to break a lock.

Break (v. t.) To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate.

Break (v. t.) To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate; as, to break silence; to break one's sleep; to break one's journey.

Break (v. t.) To destroy the completeness of; to remove a part from; as, to break a set.

Break (v. t.) To destroy the strength, firmness, or consistency of; as, to break flax.

Break (v. i.) To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder.

Break (v. i.) To burst forth; to make its way; to come to view; to appear; to dawn.

Break (v. i.) To become weakened in constitution or faculties; to lose health or strength.

Break (v. i.) To fall in business; to become bankrupt.

Break (v. i.) To fail in musical quality; as, a singer's voice breaks when it is strained beyond its compass and a tone or note is not completed, but degenerates into an unmusical sound instead. Also, to change in tone, as a boy's voice at puberty.

Break (v. t.) An interruption of continuity; change of direction; as, a break in a wall; a break in the deck of a ship.

Break (v. t.) An interruption; a pause; as, a break in friendship; a break in the conversation.

Break (v. t.) An interruption in continuity in writing or printing, as where there is an omission, an unfilled line, etc.

Breakage (n.) An allowance or compensation for things broken accidentally, as in transportation or use.

Breakdown (n.) A noisy, rapid, shuffling dance engaged in competitively by a number of persons or pairs in succession, as among the colored people of the Southern United States, and so called, perhaps, because the exercise is continued until most of those who take part in it break down.

Breaker (n.) Specifically: A machine for breaking rocks, or for breaking coal at the mines; also, the building in which such a machine is placed.

Breakwater (n.) Any structure or contrivance, as a mole, or a wall at the mouth of a harbor, to break the force of waves, and afford protection from their violence.

Breast (n.) The face of a coal working.

Breast (n.) The seat of consciousness; the repository of thought and self-consciousness, or of secrets; the seat of the affections and passions; the heart.

Breast (n.) The power of singing; a musical voice; -- so called, probably, from the connection of the voice with the lungs, which lie within the breast.

Breastbeam (n.) The front transverse beam of a locomotive.

Breasted (a.) Having a breast; -- used in composition with qualifying words, in either a literal or a metaphorical sense; as, a single-breasted coat.

Breastplate (n.) A plate of metal covering the breast as defensive armor.

Breastrail (n.) The upper rail of any parapet of ordinary height, as of a balcony; the railing of a quarter-deck, etc.

Breastwheel (n.) A water wheel, on which the stream of water strikes neither so high as in the overshot wheel, nor so low as in the undershot, but generally at about half the height of the wheel, being kept in contact with it by the breasting. The water acts on the float boards partly by impulse, partly by its weight.

Breathe (v. t.) To suffer to take breath, or recover the natural breathing; to rest; as, to breathe a horse.

Breathe (v. t.) To utter without vocality, as the nonvocal consonants.

Breathing (n.) Utterance; communication or publicity by words.

Breathless (a.) Not breathing; holding the breath, on account of fear, expectation, or intense interest; attended with a holding of the breath; as, breathless attention.

Breccia (n.) A rock composed of angular fragments either of the same mineral or of different minerals, etc., united by a cement, and commonly presenting a variety of colors.

Breech (v. t.) To cover as with breeches.

Breeches (n. pl.) A garment worn by men, covering the hips and thighs; smallclothes.

Breeching (n.) A strong rope rove through the cascabel of a cannon and secured to ringbolts in the ship's side, to limit the recoil of the gun when it is discharged.

Breeching (n.) The sheet iron casing at the end of boilers to convey the smoke from the flues to the smokestack.

Breech sight () A device attached to the breech of a firearm, to guide the eye, in conjunction with the front sight, in taking aim.

Breed (v. t.) To give birth to; to be the native place of; as, a pond breeds fish; a northern country breeds stout men.

Breeding (n.) Deportment or behavior in the external offices and decorums of social life; manners; knowledge of, or training in, the ceremonies, or polite observances of society.

Breeze (n.) An excited or ruffed state of feeling; a flurry of excitement; a disturbance; a quarrel; as, the discovery produced a breeze.

Breeze (n.) Refuse left in the process of making coke or burning charcoal.

Breeze (n.) Refuse coal, coal ashes, and cinders, used in the burning of bricks.

Bregma (n.) The point of junction of the coronal and sagittal sutures of the skull.

Brehon (n.) An ancient Irish or Scotch judge.

Brettice (n.) The wooden boarding used in supporting the roofs and walls of coal mines. See Brattice.

Breve (n.) Any writ or precept under seal, issued out of any court.

Breve (n.) A curved mark [/] used commonly to indicate the short quantity of a vowel.

Brevet (n.) A commission giving an officer higher rank than that for which he receives pay; an honorary promotion of an officer.

Brevet (v. t.) To confer rank upon by brevet.

Brevet (a.) Taking or conferring rank by brevet; as, a brevet colonel; a brevet commission.

Brevetcy (n.) The rank or condition of a brevet officer.

Breviary (n.) An abridgment; a compend; an epitome; a brief account or summary.

Breviary (n.) A book containing the daily public or canonical prayers of the Roman Catholic or of the Greek Church for the seven canonical hours, namely, matins and lauds, the first, third, sixth, and ninth hours, vespers, and compline; -- distinguished from the missal.

Breviate (n.) A short compend; a summary; a brief statement.

Brevity (n.) Contraction into few words; conciseness.

Brew (v. t.) To boil or seethe; to cook.

Brew (v. t.) To prepare by steeping and mingling; to concoct.

Brew (v. t.) To foment or prepare, as by brewing; to contrive; to plot; to concoct; to hatch; as, to brew mischief.

Bribe (n.) A price, reward, gift, or favor bestowed or promised with a view to prevent the judgment or corrupt the conduct of a judge, witness, voter, or other person in a position of trust.

Bribe (v. t.) To give or promise a reward or consideration to (a judge, juror, legislator, voter, or other person in a position of trust) with a view to prevent the judgment or corrupt the conduct; to induce or influence by a bribe; to give a bribe to.

Bribe (v. i.) To commit robbery or theft.

Bribe (v. i.) To give a bribe to a person; to pervert the judgment or corrupt the action of a person in a position of trust, by some gift or promise.

Briber (n.) One who bribes, or pays for corrupt practices.

Bribery (n.) The act or practice of giving or taking bribes; the act of influencing the official or political action of another by corrupt inducements.

Bric-a brac (n.) Miscellaneous curiosities and works of decorative art, considered collectively.

Brick (n.) Bricks, collectively, as designating that kind of material; as, a load of brick; a thousand of brick.

Brick (v. t.) To lay or pave with bricks; to surround, line, or construct with bricks.

Brick (v. t.) To imitate or counterfeit a brick wall on, as by smearing plaster with red ocher, making the joints with an edge tool, and pointing them.

Bricole (n.) A kind of traces with hooks and rings, with which men drag and maneuver guns where horses can not be used.

Bridewell (n.) A house of correction for the confinement of disorderly persons; -- so called from a hospital built in 1553 near St. Bride's (or Bridget's) well, in London, which was subsequently a penal workhouse.

Bridge (n.) A structure, usually of wood, stone, brick, or iron, erected over a river or other water course, or over a chasm, railroad, etc., to make a passageway from one bank to the other.

Bridge (n.) Anything supported at the ends, which serves to keep some other thing from resting upon the object spanned, as in engraving, watchmaking, etc., or which forms a platform or staging over which something passes or is conveyed.

Bridge (n.) A device to measure the resistance of a wire or other conductor forming part of an electric circuit.

Bridgehead (n.) A fortification commanding the extremity of a bridge nearest the enemy, to insure the preservation and usefulness of the bridge, and prevent the enemy from crossing; a tete-de-pont.

Bridle (n.) The head gear with which a horse is governed and restrained, consisting of a headstall, a bit, and reins, with other appendages.

Bridle (v. t.) To restrain, guide, or govern, with, or as with, a bridle; to check, curb, or control; as, to bridle the passions; to bridle a muse.

Bridle (v. i.) To hold up the head, and draw in the chin, as an expression of pride, scorn, or resentment; to assume a lofty manner; -- usually with up.

Bridoon (n.) The snaffle and rein of a military bridle, which acts independently of the bit, at the pleasure of the rider. It is used in connection with a curb bit, which has its own rein.

Brief (a.) Rife; common; prevalent.

Brief (a.) A short concise writing or letter; a statement in few words.

Brief (a.) An abridgment or concise statement of a client's case, made out for the instruction of counsel in a trial at law. This word is applied also to a statement of the heads or points of a law argument.

Brief (n.) A writ issuing from the chancery, directed to any judge ordinary, commanding and authorizing that judge to call a jury to inquire into the case, and upon their verdict to pronounce sentence.

Brief (n.) A letter patent, from proper authority, authorizing a collection or charitable contribution of money in churches, for any public or private purpose.

Briefman (n.) A copier of a manuscript.

Briefness (n.) The quality of being brief; brevity; conciseness in discourse or writing.

Brigade (n.) A body of troops, whether cavalry, artillery, infantry, or mixed, consisting of two or more regiments, under the command of a brigadier general.

Brigadier general () An officer in rank next above a colonel, and below a major general. He commands a brigade, and is sometimes called, by a shortening of his title, simple a brigadier.

Brigandine (n.) A coast of armor for the body, consisting of scales or plates, sometimes overlapping each other, generally of metal, and sewed to linen or other material. It was worn in the Middle Ages.

Bright (a.) Having qualities that render conspicuous or attractive, or that affect the mind as light does the eye; resplendent with charms; as, bright beauty.

Bright (a.) Of brilliant color; of lively hue or appearance.

Brighten (v. i.) To grow bright, or more bright; to become less dark or gloomy; to clear up; to become bright or cheerful.

Bright's disease () An affection of the kidneys, usually inflammatory in character, and distinguished by the occurrence of albumin and renal casts in the urine. Several varieties of Bright's disease are now recognized, differing in the part of the kidney involved, and in the intensity and course of the morbid process.

Brigue (n.) A cabal, intrigue, faction, contention, strife, or quarrel.

Brigue (n.) To contend for; to canvass; to solicit.

Brilliant (a.) A diamond or other gem of the finest cut, formed into faces and facets, so as to reflect and refract the light, by which it is rendered more brilliant. It has at the middle, or top, a principal face, called the table, which is surrounded by a number of sloping facets forming a bizet; below, it has a small face or collet, parallel to the table, connected with the girdle by a pavilion of elongated facets. It is thus distinguished from the rose diamond, which is entirely covered with facets on the surface, and is flat below.

Brilliant (a.) A kind of cotton goods, figured on the weaving.

Brim (n.) The edge or margin, as of a fountain, or of the water contained in it; the brink; border.

Brim (a.) Fierce; sharp; cold. See Breme.

Brimful (a.) Full to the brim; completely full; ready to overflow.

Brimmed (a.) Having a brim; -- usually in composition.

Brinded (a.) Of a gray or tawny color with streaks of darker hue; streaked; brindled.

Brindle (n.) A brindled color; also, that which is brindled.

Bring (v. t.) To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to be; to bear from a more distant to a nearer place; to fetch.

Bring (v. t.) To cause the accession or obtaining of; to procure; to make to come; to produce; to draw to.

Bring (v. t.) To convey; to move; to carry or conduct.

Bring (v. t.) To produce in exchange; to sell for; to fetch; as, what does coal bring per ton?

Brisk (v. t. & i.) To make or become lively; to enliven; to animate; to take, or cause to take, an erect or bold attitude; -- usually with up.

Bristle (n.) A short, stiff, coarse hair, as on the back of swine.

Bristle (v. i.) To appear as if covered with bristles; to have standing, thick and erect, like bristles.

Britt (n.) The young of the common herring; also, a small species of herring; the sprat.

Britannia (n.) A white-metal alloy of tin, antimony, bismuth, copper, etc. It somewhat resembles silver, and is used for table ware. Called also Britannia metal.

Bright (v. t.) To be or become overripe, as wheat, barley, or hops.

Britzska (n.) A long carriage, with a calash top, so constructed as to give space for reclining at night, when used on a journey.

Broach (n.) A tool of steel, generally tapering, and of a polygonal form, with from four to eight cutting edges, for smoothing or enlarging holes in metal; sometimes made smooth or without edges, as for burnishing pivot holes in watches; a reamer. The broach for gun barrels is commonly square and without taper.

Broach (n.) To make public; to utter; to publish first; to put forth; to introduce as a topic of conversation.

Broach (n.) To shape roughly, as a block of stone, by chiseling with a coarse tool.

Broad (superl.) Free; unrestrained; unconfined.

Broad (superl.) Cross; coarse; indelicate; as, a broad compliment; a broad joke; broad humor.

Broad (superl.) Strongly marked; as, a broad Scotch accent.

Broadbill (n.) A wild duck (Aythya, / Fuligula, marila), which appears in large numbers on the eastern coast of the United States, in autumn; -- called also bluebill, blackhead, raft duck, and scaup duck. See Scaup duck.

Broad Church () A portion of the Church of England, consisting of persons who claim to hold a position, in respect to doctrine and fellowship, intermediate between the High Church party and the Low Church, or evangelical, party. The term has been applied to other bodies of men holding liberal or comprehensive views of Christian doctrine and fellowship.

Broaden (a.) To grow broad; to become broader or wider.

Broaden (v. t.) To make broad or broader; to render more broad or comprehensive.

Broadness (n.) The condition or quality of being broad; breadth; coarseness; grossness.

Broadpiece (n.) An old English gold coin, broader than a guinea, as a Carolus or Jacobus.

Broad seal () The great seal of England; the public seal of a country or state.

Broadside (n.) A sheet of paper containing one large page, or printed on one side only; -- called also broadsheet.

Brocatel (n.) A kind of coarse brocade, or figured fabric, used chiefly for tapestry, linings for carriages, etc.

Broccoli (n.) A plant of the Cabbage species (Brassica oleracea) of many varieties, resembling the cauliflower. The "curd," or flowering head, is the part used for food.

Brochantite (n.) A basic sulphate of copper, occurring in emerald-green crystals.

Brochure (v. t.) A printed and stitched book containing only a few leaves; a pamphlet.

Brogan (n.) A stout, coarse shoe; a brogue.

Brogue (n.) A stout, coarse shoe; a brogan.

Broil (n.) A tumult; a noisy quarrel; a disturbance; a brawl; contention; discord, either between individuals or in the state.

Broil (v. t.) To cook by direct exposure to heat over a fire, esp. upon a gridiron over coals.

Broil (v. t.) To subject to great (commonly direct) heat.

Broil (v. i.) To be subjected to the action of heat, as meat over the fire; to be greatly heated, or to be made uncomfortable with heat.

Broiler (n.) One who broils, or cooks by broiling.

Broken (v. t.) Disconnected; not continuous; also, rough; uneven; as, a broken surface.

Broken (v. t.) Subdued; humbled; contrite.

Broken (v. t.) Not carried into effect; not adhered to; violated; as, a broken promise, vow, or contract; a broken law.

Broken (v. t.) Imperfectly spoken, as by a foreigner; as, broken English; imperfectly spoken on account of emotion; as, to say a few broken words at parting.

Broker (v. t.) An agent employed to effect bargains and contracts, as a middleman or negotiator, between other persons, for a compensation commonly called brokerage. He takes no possession, as broker, of the subject matter of the negotiation. He generally contracts in the names of those who employ him, and not in his own.

Broker (v. t.) A dealer in secondhand goods.

Brokerage (n.) The fee, reward, or commission, given or changed for transacting business as a broker.

Broma (n.) A light form of prepared cocoa (or cacao), or the drink made from it.

Bromal (n.) An oily, colorless fluid, CBr3.COH, related to bromoform, as chloral is to chloroform, and obtained by the action of bromine on alcohol.

Bromate (v. t.) To combine or impregnate with bromine; as, bromated camphor.

Bromeliaceous (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a family of endogenous and mostly epiphytic or saxicolous plants of which the genera Tillandsia and Billbergia are examples. The pineapple, though terrestrial, is also of this family.

Bromic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, bromine; -- said of those compounds of bromine in which this element has a valence of five, or the next to its highest; as, bromic acid.

Bromide (n.) A compound of bromine with a positive radical.

Bromine (n.) One of the elements, related in its chemical qualities to chlorine and iodine. Atomic weight 79.8. Symbol Br. It is a deep reddish brown liquid of a very disagreeable odor, emitting a brownish vapor at the ordinary temperature. In combination it is found in minute quantities in sea water, and in many saline springs. It occurs also in the mineral bromyrite.

Bromism (n.) A diseased condition produced by the excessive use of bromine or one of its compounds. It is characterized by mental dullness and muscular weakness.

Bromoform (n.) A colorless liquid, CHBr3, having an agreeable odor and sweetish taste. It is produced by the simultaneous action of bromine and caustic potash upon wood spirit, alcohol, or acetone, as also by certain other reactions. In composition it is the same as chloroform, with the substitution of bromine for chlorine. It is somewhat similar to chloroform in its effects.

Brompicrin (n.) A pungent colorless explosive liquid, CNO2Br3, analogous to and resembling chlorpicrin.

Bronco (n.) Same as Broncho.

Brontotherium (n.) A genus of large extinct mammals from the miocene strata of western North America. They were allied to the rhinoceros, but the skull bears a pair of powerful horn cores in front of the orbits, and the fore feet were four-toed. See Illustration in Appendix.

Bronze (a.) An alloy of copper and tin, to which small proportions of other metals, especially zinc, are sometimes added. It is hard and sonorous, and is used for statues, bells, cannon, etc., the proportions of the ingredients being varied to suit the particular purposes. The varieties containing the higher proportions of tin are brittle, as in bell metal and speculum metal.

Bronze (a.) A yellowish or reddish brown, the color of bronze; also, a pigment or powder for imitating bronze.

Bronze (n.) To give an appearance of bronze to, by a coating of bronze powder, or by other means; to make of the color of bronze; as, to bronze plaster casts; to bronze coins or medals.

Bronzing (n.) The act or art of communicating to articles in metal, wood, clay, plaster, etc., the appearance of bronze by means of bronze powders, or imitative painting, or by chemical processes.

Bronzist (n.) One who makes, imitates, collects, or deals in, bronzes.

Brooch (n.) A painting all of one color, as a sepia painting, or an India painting.

Brood (v. t.) Heavy waste in tin and copper ores.

Brood (v. i.) To sit on and cover eggs, as a fowl, for the purpose of warming them and hatching the young; or to sit over and cover young, as a hen her chickens, in order to warm and protect them; hence, to sit quietly, as if brooding.

Brood (v. i.) To have the mind dwell continuously or moodily on a subject; to think long and anxiously; to be in a state of gloomy, serious thought; -- usually followed by over or on; as, to brood over misfortunes.

Brood (v. t.) To sit over, cover, and cherish; as, a hen broods her chickens.

Brookite (n.) A mineral consisting of titanic oxide, and hence identical with rutile and octahedrite in composition, but crystallizing in the orthorhombic system.

Broom (n.) A plant having twigs suitable for making brooms to sweep with when bound together; esp., the Cytisus scoparius of Western Europe, which is a low shrub with long, straight, green, angular branches, minute leaves, and large yellow flowers.

Broom (n.) An implement for sweeping floors, etc., commonly made of the panicles or tops of broom corn, bound together or attached to a long wooden handle; -- so called because originally made of the twigs of the broom.

Broom corn () A variety of Sorghum vulgare, having a joined stem, like maize, rising to the height of eight or ten feet, and bearing its seeds on a panicle with long branches, of which brooms are made.

Brose (n.) Pottage made by pouring some boiling liquid on meal (esp. oatmeal), and stirring it. It is called beef brose, water brose, etc., according to the name of the liquid (beef broth, hot water, etc.) used.

Brother (n.) One related or closely united to another by some common tie or interest, as of rank, profession, membership in a society, toil, suffering, etc.; -- used among judges, clergymen, monks, physicians, lawyers, professors of religion, etc.

Brother german () A brother by both the father's and mother's side, in contradistinction to a uterine brother, one by the mother only.

Brotherly (a.) Of or pertaining to brothers; such as is natural for brothers; becoming to brothers; kind; affectionate; as, brotherly love.

Brow (n.) The prominent ridge over the eye, with the hair that covers it, forming an arch above the orbit.

Brow (n.) The hair that covers the brow (ridge over the eyes); the eyebrow.

Brow (n.) The general air of the countenance.

Browbeat (v. t.) To depress or bear down with haughty, stern looks, or with arrogant speech and dogmatic assertions; to abash or disconcert by impudent or abusive words or looks; to bully; as, to browbeat witnesses.

Browbeating (n.) The act of bearing down, abashing, or disconcerting, with stern looks, supercilious manners, or confident assertions.

Browed (a.) Having (such) a brow; -- used in composition; as, dark-browed, stern-browed.

Brown (superl.) Of a dark color, of various shades between black and red or yellow.

Brown (n.) A dark color inclining to red or yellow, resulting from the mixture of red and black, or of red, black, and yellow; a tawny, dusky hue.

Brown (v. t.) To make brown by scorching slightly; as, to brown meat or flour.

Brown (v. t.) To give a bright brown color to, as to gun barrels, by forming a thin coat of oxide on their surface.

Brown (v. i.) To become brown.

Brownian (a.) Pertaining to Dr. Robert Brown, who first demonstrated (about 1827) the commonness of the motion described below.

Browning (n.) The act or operation of giving a brown color, as to gun barrels, etc.

Browning (n.) A smooth coat of brown mortar, usually the second coat, and the preparation for the finishing coat of plaster.

Brownist (n.) A follower of Robert Brown, of England, in the 16th century, who taught that every church is complete and independent in itself when organized, and consists of members meeting in one place, having full power to elect and depose its officers.

Brown thrush () A common American singing bird (Harporhynchus rufus), allied to the mocking bird; -- also called brown thrasher.

Brownwort (n.) A species of figwort or Scrophularia (S. vernalis), and other species of the same genus, mostly perennials with inconspicuous coarse flowers.

Bruise (v. t.) To injure, as by a blow or collision, without laceration; to contuse; as, to bruise one's finger with a hammer; to bruise the bark of a tree with a stone; to bruise an apple by letting it fall.

Bruise (n.) An injury to the flesh of animals, or to plants, fruit, etc., with a blunt or heavy instrument, or by collision with some other body; a contusion; as, a bruise on the head; bruises on fruit.

Bruiser (n.) A concave tool used in grinding lenses or the speculums of telescopes.

Bruisewort (n.) A plant supposed to heal bruises, as the true daisy, the soapwort, and the comfrey.

Brumaire (n.) The second month of the calendar adopted by the first French republic. It began thirty days after the autumnal equinox. See Vendemiaire.

Brunette (a.) A girl or woman with a somewhat brown or dark complexion.

Brunonian (a.) Pertaining to, or invented by, Brown; -- a term applied to a system of medicine promulgated in the 18th century by John Brown, of Scotland, the fundamental doctrine of which was, that life is a state of excitation produced by the normal action of external agents upon the body, and that disease consists in excess or deficiency of excitation.

Brunswick green () An oxychloride of copper, used as a green pigment; also, a carbonate of copper similarly employed.

Brunt (v. t.) The heat, or utmost violence, of an onset; the strength or greatest fury of any contention; as, the brunt of a battle.

Brunt (v. t.) The force of a blow; shock; collision.

Brush (n.) An instrument composed of bristles, or other like material, set in a suitable back or handle, as of wood, bone, or ivory, and used for various purposes, as in removing dust from clothes, laying on colors, etc. Brushes have different shapes and names according to their use; as, clothes brush, paint brush, tooth brush, etc.

Brush (n.) A bundle of flexible wires or thin plates of metal, used to conduct an electrical current to or from the commutator of a dynamo, electric motor, or similar apparatus.

Brush (n.) A skirmish; a slight encounter; a shock or collision; as, to have a brush with an enemy.

Brush (n.) A short contest, or trial, of speed.

Brush (n.) To apply a brush to, according to its particular use; to rub, smooth, clean, paint, etc., with a brush.

Brush (n.) To remove or gather by brushing, or by an act like that of brushing, or by passing lightly over, as wind; -- commonly with off.

Brushiness (n.) The quality of resembling a brush; brushlike condition; shagginess.

Brushite (n.) A white or gray crystalline mineral consisting of the acid phosphate of calcium.

Brushwood (n.) Brush; a thicket or coppice of small trees and shrubs.

Brutalize (v. i.) To become brutal, inhuman, barbarous, or coarse and beasty.

Brute (a.) Not having sensation; senseless; inanimate; unconscious; without intelligence or volition; as, the brute earth; the brute powers of nature.

Brute (a.) Having the physical powers predominating over the mental; coarse; unpolished; unintelligent.

Brute (n.) A brutal person; a savage in heart or manners; as unfeeling or coarse person.

Brutish (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a brute or brutes; of a cruel, gross, and stupid nature; coarse; unfeeling; unintelligent.

Bryonin (n.) A bitter principle obtained from the root of the bryony (Bryonia alba and B. dioica). It is a white, or slightly colored, substance, and is emetic and cathartic.

Bryony (n.) The common name of several cucurbitaceous plants of the genus Bryonia. The root of B. alba (rough or white bryony) and of B. dioica is a strong, irritating cathartic.

Bryozoa (n. pl.) A class of Molluscoidea, including minute animals which by budding form compound colonies; -- called also Polyzoa.

Bryozoum (n.) An individual zooid of a bryozoan coralline, of which there may be two or more kinds in a single colony. The zooecia usually have a wreath of tentacles around the mouth, and a well developed stomach and intestinal canal; but these parts are lacking in the other zooids (Avicularia, Ooecia, etc.).

Bubble (n.) To rise in bubbles, as liquids when boiling or agitated; to contain bubbles.

Bubonocele (n.) An inguinal hernia; esp. that incomplete variety in which the hernial pouch descends only as far as the groin, forming a swelling there like a bubo.

Buccinum (n.) A genus of large univalve mollusks abundant in the arctic seas. It includes the common whelk (B. undatum).

Buck (v. i.) To copulate, as bucks and does.

Buck (v. t.) To subject to a mode of punishment which consists in tying the wrists together, passing the arms over the bent knees, and putting a stick across the arms and in the angle formed by the knees.

Bucket (n.) A vessel (as a tub or scoop) for hoisting and conveying coal, ore, grain, etc.

Buckie (n.) A large spiral marine shell, esp. the common whelk. See Buccinum.

Buckle (n.) A device, usually of metal, consisting of a frame with one more movable tongues or catches, used for fastening things together, as parts of dress or harness, by means of a strap passing through the frame and pierced by the tongue.

Buckle (n.) A contorted expression, as of the face.

Buckle (n.) To fasten or confine with a buckle or buckles; as, to buckle a harness.

Buckle (n.) To bend; to cause to kink, or to become distorted.

Buckle (v. i.) To bend permanently; to become distorted; to bow; to curl; to kink.

Buckle (v. i.) To enter upon some labor or contest; to join in close fight; to struggle; to contend.

Buckra (n.) A white man; -- a term used by negroes of the African coast, West Indies, etc.

Buckram (n.) A coarse cloth of linen or hemp, stiffened with size or glue, used in garments to keep them in the form intended, and for wrappers to cover merchandise.

Buck's-horn (n.) A plant with leaves branched somewhat like a buck's horn (Plantago Coronopus); also, Lobelia coronopifolia.

Buckshot (n.) A coarse leaden shot, larger than swan shot, used in hunting deer and large game.

Buckskin (n.) A soft strong leather, usually yellowish or grayish in color, made of deerskin.

Bucolic (a.) Of or pertaining to the life and occupation of a shepherd; pastoral; rustic.

Bucolic (n.) A pastoral poem, representing rural affairs, and the life, manners, and occupation of shepherds; as, the Bucolics of Theocritus and Virgil.

Bucolical (a.) Bucolic.

Bud (n.) A small protuberance on the stem or branches of a plant, containing the rudiments of future leaves, flowers, or stems; an undeveloped branch or flower.

Budding (n.) A process of asexual reproduction, in which a new organism or cell is formed by a protrusion of a portion of the animal or vegetable organism, the bud thus formed sometimes remaining attached to the parent stalk or cell, at other times becoming free; gemmation. See Hydroidea.

Buddle (n.) An apparatus, especially an inclined trough or vat, in which stamped ore is concentrated by subjecting it to the action of running water so as to wash out the lighter and less valuable portions.

Bude burner () A burner consisting of two or more concentric Argand burners (the inner rising above the outer) and a central tube by which oxygen gas or common air is supplied.

Bude light () A light in which high illuminating power is obtained by introducing a jet of oxygen gas or of common air into the center of a flame fed with coal gas or with oil.

budgerow (n.) A large and commodious, but generally cumbrous and sluggish boat, used for journeys on the Ganges.

Budget (n.) A bag or sack with its contents; hence, a stock or store; an accumulation; as, a budget of inventions.

Budget (n.) The annual financial statement which the British chancellor of the exchequer makes in the House of Commons. It comprehends a general view of the finances of the country, with the proposed plan of taxation for the ensuing year. The term is sometimes applied to a similar statement in other countries.

Buff (n.) The color of buff; a light yellow, shading toward pink, gray, or brown.

Buff (n.) A military coat, made of buff leather.

Buff (n.) The grayish viscid substance constituting the buffy coat. See Buffy coat, under Buffy, a.

Buff (a.) A wheel covered with buff leather, and used in polishing cutlery, spoons, etc.

Buff (a.) Of the color of buff.

Buffa (n. fem.) The comic actress in an opera.

Buffalo (n.) A species of the genus Bos or Bubalus (B. bubalus), originally from India, but now found in most of the warmer countries of the eastern continent. It is larger and less docile than the common ox, and is fond of marshy places and rivers.

Buffel duck () A small duck (Charitonetta albeola); the spirit duck, or butterball. The head of the male is covered with numerous elongated feathers, and thus appears large. Called also bufflehead.

Buffer (n.) An elastic apparatus or fender, for deadening the jar caused by the collision of bodies; as, a buffer at the end of a railroad car.

Bufferhead (n.) The head of a buffer, which recieves the concussion, in railroad carriages.

Buffet (n.) A counter for refreshments; a restaurant at a railroad station, or place of public gathering.

Buffet (v. i.) A small stool; a stool for a buffet or counter.

Buffet (v. t.) To affect as with blows; to strike repeatedly; to strive with or contend against; as, to buffet the billows.

Buffet (v. i.) To exercise or play at boxing; to strike; to smite; to strive; to contend.

Buffeting (n.) A succession of blows; continued violence, as of winds or waves; afflictions; adversity.

Buffin (n.) A sort of coarse stuff; as, buffin gowns.

Buffo (n.masc.) The comic actor in an opera.

Buffoonish (a.) Like a buffoon; consisting in low jests or gestures.

Bufonite (n.) An old name for a fossil consisting of the petrified teeth and palatal bones of fishes belonging to the family of Pycnodonts (thick teeth), whose remains occur in the oolite and chalk formations; toadstone; -- so named from a notion that it was originally formed in the head of a toad.

Buggery (n.) Unnatural sexual intercourse; sodomy.

Bugle (n.) A copper instrument of the horn quality of tone, shorter and more conical that the trumpet, sometimes keyed; formerly much used in military bands, very rarely in the orchestra; now superseded by the cornet; -- called also the Kent bugle.

Bugle (n.) An elongated glass bead, of various colors, though commonly black.

Bugleweed (n.) A plant of the Mint family and genus Lycopus; esp. L. Virginicus, which has mild narcotic and astringent properties, and is sometimes used as a remedy for hemorrhage.

Buhlwork (n.) Decorative woodwork in which tortoise shell, yellow metal, white metal, etc., are inlaid, forming scrolls, cartouches, etc.

Build (v. t.) To erect or construct, as an edifice or fabric of any kind; to form by uniting materials into a regular structure; to fabricate; to make; to raise.

Build (v. t.) To increase and strengthen; to increase the power and stability of; to settle, or establish, and preserve; -- frequently with up; as, to build up one's constitution.

Build (n.) Form or mode of construction; general figure; make; as, the build of a ship.

Building (n.) The act of constructing, erecting, or establishing.

Building (n.) The art of constructing edifices, or the practice of civil architecture.

Building (n.) That which is built; a fabric or edifice constructed, as a house, a church, etc.

Built (a.) Formed; shaped; constructed; made; -- often used in composition and preceded by the word denoting the form; as, frigate-built, clipper-built, etc.

Bulb (n.) A spheroidal body growing from a plant either above or below the ground (usually below), which is strictly a bud, consisting of a cluster of partially developed leaves, and producing, as it grows, a stem above, and roots below, as in the onion, tulip, etc. It differs from a corm in not being solid.

Bulbar (a.) Of or pertaining to bulb; especially, in medicine, pertaining to the bulb of the spinal cord, or medulla oblongata; as, bulbar paralysis.

Bulbo-tuber (n.) A corm.

Bulbous (n.) Having or containing bulbs, or a bulb; growing from bulbs; bulblike in shape or structure.

Bulbul (n.) The Persian nightingale (Pycnonotus jocosus). The name is also applied to several other Asiatic singing birds, of the family Timaliidae. The green bulbuls belong to the Chloropsis and allied genera.

Bull (n.) Taurus, the second of the twelve signs of the zodiac.

Bull (n.) A constellation of the zodiac between Aries and Gemini. It contains the Pleiades.

Bull (v. i.) To be in heat; to manifest sexual desire as cows do.

Bull (v. i.) A grotesque blunder in language; an apparent congruity, but real incongruity, of ideas, contained in a form of expression; so called, perhaps, from the apparent incongruity between the dictatorial nature of the pope's bulls and his professions of humility.

Bulla (n.) A bleb; a vesicle, or an elevation of the cuticle, containing a transparent watery fluid.

Bullace (n.) A small European plum (Prunus communis, var. insitita). See Plum.

Bullary (n.) A collection of papal bulls.

Bull brier () A species of Smilax (S. Pseudo-China) growing from New Jersey to the Gulf of Mexico, which has very large tuberous and farinaceous rootstocks, formerly used by the Indians for a sort of bread, and by the negroes as an ingredient in making beer; -- called also bamboo brier and China brier.

Bullcomber (n.) A scaraboid beetle; esp. the Typhaeus vulgaris of Europe.

Bulldog (n.) A variety of dog, of remarkable ferocity, courage, and tenacity of grip; -- so named, probably, from being formerly employed in baiting bulls.

Bulldog (a.) Characteristic of, or like, a bulldog; stubborn; as, bulldog courage; bulldog tenacity.

Bulldoze (v. t.) To intimidate; to restrain or coerce by intimidation or violence; -- used originally of the intimidation of negro voters, in Louisiana.

Bulletin (n.) A periodical publication, especially one containing the proceeding of a society.

Bullion (n.) Uncoined gold or silver in the mass.

Bullion (n.) Base or uncurrent coin.

Bullion (n.) Showy metallic ornament, as of gold, silver, or copper, on bridles, saddles, etc.

Bullion (n.) Heavy twisted fringe, made of fine gold or silver wire and used for epaulets; also, any heavy twisted fringe whose cords are prominent.

Bullionist (n.) An advocate for a metallic currency, or a paper currency always convertible into gold.

Bullirag (n.) To intimidate by bullying; to rally contemptuously; to badger.

Bull's-eye (n.) A small circular or oval wooden block without sheaves, having a groove around it and a hole through it, used for connecting rigging.

Bull's-eye (n.) A lantern, with a thick glass lens on one side for concentrating the light on any object; also, the lens itself.

Bully (n.) A noisy, blustering fellow, more insolent than courageous; one who is threatening and quarrelsome; an insolent, tyrannical fellow.

Bumboat (n.) A clumsy boat, used for conveying provisions, fruit, etc., for sale, to vessels lying in port or off shore.

Bump (v. i.) To come in violent contact with something; to thump.

Bumper (n.) A covered house at a theater, etc., in honor of some favorite performer.

Bumpkin (n.) An awkward, heavy country fellow; a clown; a country lout.

Bumptious (a.) Self-conceited; forward; pushing.

Bunch (n.) A collection, cluster, or tuft, properly of things of the same kind, growing or fastened together; as, a bunch of grapes; a bunch of keys.

Bunch (n.) A small isolated mass of ore, as distinguished from a continuous vein.

Bunchberry (n.) The dwarf cornel (Cornus Canadensis), which bears a dense cluster of bright red, edible berries.

Bunch grass () A grass growing in bunches and affording pasture. In California, Atropis tenuifolia, Festuca scabrella, and several kinds of Stipa are favorite bunch grasses. In Utah, Eriocoma cuspidata is a good bunch grass.

Bunchiness (n.) The quality or condition of being bunchy; knobbiness.

Buncombe (n.) Alt. of Bunkum

Bunkum (n.) Speech-making for the gratification of constituents, or to gain public applause; flattering talk for a selfish purpose; anything said for mere show.

Bund (n.) League; confederacy; esp. the confederation of German states.

Bundesrath (n.) The federal council of the German Empire. In the Bundesrath and the Reichstag are vested the legislative functions. The federal council of Switzerland is also so called.

Bundle (n.) A number of things bound together, as by a cord or envelope, into a mass or package convenient for handling or conveyance; a loose package; a roll; as, a bundle of straw or of paper; a bundle of old clothes.

Bungalow (n.) A thatched or tiled house or cottage, of a single story, usually surrounded by a veranda.

Bungarum (n.) A venomous snake of India, of the genus Bungarus, allied to the cobras, but without a hood.

Bunker (n.) A large bin or similar receptacle; as, a coal bunker.

Bunkum (n.) See Buncombe.

Bunny (n.) A great collection of ore without any vein coming into it or going out from it.

Buntine (n.) A thin woolen stuff, used chiefly for flags, colors, and ships' signals.

Bunion (n.) An enlargement and inflammation of a small membranous sac (one of the bursae muscosae), usually occurring on the first joint of the great toe.

Buoyage (n.) Buoys, taken collectively; a series of buoys, as for the guidance of vessels into or out of port; the providing of buoys.

Buoyancy (n.) The property of floating on the surface of a liquid, or in a fluid, as in the atmosphere; specific lightness, which is inversely as the weight compared with that of an equal volume of water.

Buprestidan (n.) One of a tribe of beetles, of the genus Buprestis and allied genera, usually with brilliant metallic colors. The larvae are usually borers in timber, or beneath bark, and are often very destructive to trees.

Burden (n.) A fixed quantity of certain commodities; as, a burden of gad steel, 120 pounds.

Burdock (n.) A genus of coarse biennial herbs (Lappa), bearing small burs which adhere tenaciously to clothes, or to the fur or wool of animals.

Bureaucracy (n.) A system of carrying on the business of government by means of departments or bureaus, each under the control of a chief, in contradiction to a system in which the officers of government have an associated authority and responsibility; also, government conducted on this system.

Bureaucracy (n.) Government officials, collectively.

Bureaucrat (n.) An official of a bureau; esp. an official confirmed in a narrow and arbitrary routine.

Burette (n.) An apparatus for delivering measured quantities of liquid or for measuring the quantity of liquid or gas received or discharged. It consists essentially of a graduated glass tube, usually furnished with a small aperture and stopcock.

Bur fish () A spinose, plectognath fish of the Allantic coast of the United States (esp. Chilo mycterus geometricus) having the power of distending its body with water or air, so as to resemble a chestnut bur; -- called also ball fish, balloon fish, and swellfish.

Burgee (n.) A kind of small coat.

Burgess (n.) An inhabitant of a Scotch burgh qualified to vote for municipal officers.

Burggrave (n.) Originally, one appointed to the command of a burg (fortress or castle); but the title afterward became hereditary, with a domain attached.

Burgh (n.) A borough or incorporated town, especially, one in Scotland. See Borough.

Burghbote (n.) A contribution toward the building or repairing of castles or walls for the defense of a city or town.

Burgher (n.) A member of that party, among the Scotch seceders, which asserted the lawfulness of the burgess oath (in which burgesses profess "the true religion professed within the realm"), the opposite party being called antiburghers.

Burghmote (n.) A court or meeting of a burgh or borough; a borough court held three times yearly.

Burglarious (a.) Pertaining to burglary; constituting the crime of burglary.

Burglariously (adv.) With an intent to commit burglary; in the manner of a burglar.

Burglary (n.) Breaking and entering the dwelling house of another, in the nighttime, with intent to commit a felony therein, whether the felonious purpose be accomplished or not.

Burgomaster (n.) A chief magistrate of a municipal town in Holland, Flanders, and Germany, corresponding to mayor in England and the United States; a burghmaster.

Burgomaster (n.) An aquatic bird, the glaucous gull (Larus glaucus), common in arctic regions.

Burlap (n.) A coarse fabric, made of jute or hemp, used for bagging; also, a finer variety of similar material, used for curtains, etc.

Burlesque (a.) Tending to excite laughter or contempt by extravagant images, or by a contrast between the subject and the manner of treating it, as when a trifling subject is treated with mock gravity; jocular; ironical.

Burlesque (n.) An ironical or satirical composition intended to excite laughter, or to ridicule anything.

Burletta (a.) A comic operetta; a music farce.

Burn (v. t.) To consume with fire; to reduce to ashes by the action of heat or fire; -- frequently intensified by up: as, to burn up wood.

Burn (v. t.) To injure by fire or heat; to change destructively some property or properties of, by undue exposure to fire or heat; to scorch; to scald; to blister; to singe; to char; to sear; as, to burn steel in forging; to burn one's face in the sun; the sun burns the grass.

Burn (v. t.) To perfect or improve by fire or heat; to submit to the action of fire or heat for some economic purpose; to destroy or change some property or properties of, by exposure to fire or heat in due degree for obtaining a desired residuum, product, or effect; to bake; as, to burn clay in making bricks or pottery; to burn wood so as to produce charcoal; to burn limestone for the lime.

Burn (v. t.) To make or produce, as an effect or result, by the application of fire or heat; as, to burn a hole; to burn charcoal; to burn letters into a block.

Burn (v. t.) To consume, injure, or change the condition of, as if by action of fire or heat; to affect as fire or heat does; as, to burn the mouth with pepper.

Burn (v. t.) To cause to combine with oxygen or other active agent, with evolution of heat; to consume; to oxidize; as, a man burns a certain amount of carbon at each respiration; to burn iron in oxygen.

Burn (v. i.) To suffer from, or be scorched by, an excess of heat.

Burn (v. i.) To have a condition, quality, appearance, sensation, or emotion, as if on fire or excessively heated; to act or rage with destructive violence; to be in a state of lively emotion or strong desire; as, the face burns; to burn with fever.

Burn (v. i.) To combine energetically, with evolution of heat; as, copper burns in chlorine.

Burn (v. i.) In certain games, to approach near to a concealed object which is sought.

Burnet (n.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet.

Burning (n.) The act of consuming by fire or heat, or of subjecting to the effect of fire or heat; the state of being on fire or excessively heated.

Burnish (v. i.) To shine forth; to brighten; to become smooth and glossy, as from swelling or filling out; hence, to grow large.

Burnous (n.) A combination cloak and hood worn by women.

Burnt (p. p. & a.) Consumed with, or as with, fire; scorched or dried, as with fire or heat; baked or hardened in the fire or the sun.

Burrow (n.) An incorporated town. See 1st Borough.

Burrow (v. i.) To excavate a hole to lodge in, as in the earth; to lodge in a hole excavated in the earth, as conies or rabbits.

Burrow (v. i.) To lodge, or take refuge, in any deep or concealed place; to hide.

Burry (a.) Abounding in burs, or containing burs; resembling burs; as, burry wool.

Bursar (n.) A treasurer, or cash keeper; a purser; as, the bursar of a college, or of a monastery.

Bursar (n.) A student to whom a stipend or bursary is paid for his complete or partial support.

Bursary (n.) The treasury of a college or monastery.

Bursary (n.) A scholarship or charitable foundation in a university, as in Scotland; a sum given to enable a student to pursue his studies.

Burse (n.) An ornamental case of hold the corporal when not in use.

Burse (n.) An exchange, for merchants and bankers, in the cities of continental Europe. Same as Bourse.

Burst (v. i.) To exert force or pressure by which something is made suddenly to give way; to break through obstacles or limitations; hence, to appear suddenly and unexpectedly or unaccountably, or to depart in such manner; -- usually with some qualifying adverb or preposition, as forth, out, away, into, upon, through, etc.

Bury (v. t.) To cover out of sight, either by heaping something over, or by placing within something, as earth, etc.; to conceal by covering; to hide; as, to bury coals in ashes; to bury the face in the hands.

Bury (v. t.) Specifically: To cover out of sight, as the body of a deceased person, in a grave, a tomb, or the ocean; to deposit (a corpse) in its resting place, with funeral ceremonies; to inter; to inhume.

Busby (n.) A military headdress or cap, used in the British army. It is of fur, with a bag, of the same color as the facings of the regiment, hanging from the top over the right shoulder.

Buscon (n.) One who searches for ores; a prospector.

Bush (v. t.) To use a bush harrow on (land), for covering seeds sown; to harrow with a bush; as, to bush a piece of land; to bush seeds into the ground.

Bush (n.) A piece of copper, screwed into a gun, through which the venthole is bored.

Bushel (n.) A dry measure, containing four pecks, eight gallons, or thirty-two quarts.

Bushel (n.) A quantity that fills a bushel measure; as, a heap containing ten bushels of apples.

Bushelage (n.) A duty payable on commodities by the bushel.

Bushiness (n.) The condition or quality of being bushy.

Business (n.) That which busies one, or that which engages the time, attention, or labor of any one, as his principal concern or interest, whether for a longer or shorter time; constant employment; regular occupation; as, the business of life; business before pleasure.

Business (n.) Affair; concern; matter; -- used in an indefinite sense, and modified by the connected words.

Busk (n.) A thin, elastic strip of metal, whalebone, wood, or other material, worn in the front of a corset.

Busk (v. t. & i.) To go; to direct one's course.

Buskin (n.) A strong, protecting covering for the foot, coming some distance up the leg.

Buskin (n.) A similar covering for the foot and leg, made with very thick soles, to give an appearance of elevation to the stature; -- worn by tragic actors in ancient Greece and Rome. Used as a symbol of tragedy, or the tragic drama, as distinguished from comedy.

Bustling (a.) Agitated; noisy; tumultuous; characterized by confused activity; as, a bustling crowd.

Busybody (n.) One who officiously concerns himself with the affairs of others; a meddling person.

But (adv. & conj.) Except with; unless with; without.

But (adv. & conj.) Except; besides; save.

But (adv. & conj.) Excepting or excluding the fact that; save that; were it not that; unless; -- elliptical, for but that.

But (adv. & conj.) Otherwise than that; that not; -- commonly, after a negative, with that.

But (adv. & conj.) Only; solely; merely.

But (adv. & conj.) On the contrary; on the other hand; only; yet; still; however; nevertheless; more; further; -- as connective of sentences or clauses of a sentence, in a sense more or less exceptive or adversative; as, the House of Representatives passed the bill, but the Senate dissented; our wants are many, but quite of another kind.

But (prep., adv. & conj.) The outer apartment or kitchen of a two-roomed house; -- opposed to ben, the inner room.

Butcherly (a.) Like a butcher; without compunction; savage; bloody; inhuman; fell.

Butchery (n.) Murder or manslaughter, esp. when committed with unusual barbarity; great or cruel slaughter.

But (v. t.) A person at whom ridicule, jest, or contempt is directed; as, the butt of the company.

But (v. t.) A joint where the ends of two objects come squarely together without scarfing or chamfering; -- also called butt joint.

But (v. t.) The end of a connecting rod or other like piece, to which the boxing is attached by the strap, cotter, and gib.

But (v. t.) The portion of a half-coupling fastened to the end of a hose.

Butt (n.) A large cask or vessel for wine or beer. It contains two hogsheads.

Butt (n.) The common English flounder.

Butter (n.) Any substance resembling butter in degree of consistence, or other qualities, especially, in old chemistry, the chlorides, as butter of antimony, sesquichloride of antimony; also, certain concrete fat oils remaining nearly solid at ordinary temperatures, as butter of cacao, vegetable butter, shea butter.

Butter (v. t.) To cover or spread with butter.

Butterfish (n.) A name given to several different fishes, in allusion to their slippery coating of mucus, as the Stromateus triacanthus of the Atlantic coast, the Epinephelus punctatus of the southern coast, the rock eel, and the kelpfish of New Zealand.

Butternut (n.) An American tree (Juglans cinerea) of the Walnut family, and its edible fruit; -- so called from the oil contained in the latter. Sometimes called oil nut and white walnut.

Butter-scotch (n.) A kind of candy, mainly composed of sugar and butter.

Butterweed (n.) An annual composite plant of the Mississippi valley (Senecio lobatus).

Buttery (a.) Having the qualities, consistence, or appearance, of butter.

Buttery (n.) A room in some English colleges where liquors, fruit, and refreshments are kept for sale to the students.

But-thorn (n.) The common European starfish (Asterias rubens).

Butt joint () A joint in which the edges or ends of the pieces united come squarely together instead of overlapping. See 1st Butt, 8.

Buttock (n.) The convexity of a ship behind, under the stern.

Button (v. i.) To be fastened by a button or buttons; as, the coat will not button.

Buttonhole (v. t.) To hold at the button or buttonhole; to detain in conversation to weariness; to bore; as, he buttonholed me a quarter of an hour.

Buttonmold (n.) A disk of bone, wood, or other material, which is made into a button by covering it with cloth.

Buttonweed (n.) The name of several plants of the genera Spermacoce and Diodia, of the Madder family.

Butty (n.) One who mines by contract, at so much per ton of coal or ore.

Butyl (n.) A compound radical, regarded as butane, less one atom of hydrogen.

Butyrin (n.) A butyrate of glycerin; a fat contained in small quantity in milk, which helps to give to butter its peculiar flavor.

Butyrometer (n.) An instrument for determining the amount of fatty matter or butter contained in a sample of milk.

Buxine (n.) An alkaloid obtained from the Buxus sempervirens, or common box tree. It is identical with bebeerine; -- called also buxina.

Buxom (a.) Yielding; pliable or compliant; ready to obey; obedient; tractable; docile; meek; humble.

Buxom (a.) Having the characteristics of health, vigor, and comeliness, combined with a gay, lively manner; stout and rosy; jolly; frolicsome.

Buy (v. t.) To acquire the ownership of (property) by giving an accepted price or consideration therefor, or by agreeing to do so; to acquire by the payment of a price or value; to purchase; -- opposed to sell.

Buy (v. t.) To acquire or procure by something given or done in exchange, literally or figuratively; to get, at a cost or sacrifice; to buy pleasure with pain.

Buzz (v. i.) To make a low, continuous, humming or sibilant sound, like that made by bees with their wings. Hence: To utter a murmuring sound; to speak with a low, humming voice.

Buzz (v. t.) To whisper; to communicate, as tales, in an under tone; to spread, as report, by whispers, or secretly.

Buzz (v. t.) To talk to incessantly or confidentially in a low humming voice.

Buzz (n.) A continuous, humming noise, as of bees; a confused murmur, as of general conversation in low tones, or of a general expression of surprise or approbation.

Buzz (n.) The audible friction of voice consonants.

By (pref.) In the neighborhood of; near or next to; not far from; close to; along with; as, come and sit by me.

By (pref.) With, as means, way, process, etc.; through means of; with aid of; through; through the act or agency of; as, a city is destroyed by fire; profit is made by commerce; to take by force.

By (a.) Out of the common path; aside; -- used in composition, giving the meaning of something aside, secondary, or incidental, or collateral matter, a thing private or avoiding notice; as, by-line, by-place, by-play, by-street. It was formerly more freely used in composition than it is now; as, by-business, by-concernment, by-design, by-interest, etc.

Byard (n.) A piece of leather crossing the breast, used by the men who drag sledges in coal mines.

By-corner (n.) A private corner.

Bye (n.) A thing not directly aimed at; something which is a secondary object of regard; an object by the way, etc.; as in on or upon the bye, i. e., in passing; indirectly; by implication.

By-law (n.) A local or subordinate law; a private law or regulation made by a corporation for its own government.

By-law (n.) A law that is less important than a general law or constitutional provision, and subsidiary to it; a rule relating to a matter of detail; as, civic societies often adopt a constitution and by-laws for the government of their members. In this sense the word has probably been influenced by by, meaning secondary or aside.

By-pass (n.) A by-passage, for a pipe, or other channel, to divert circulation from the usual course.

Byplay (n.) Action carried on aside, and commonly in dumb show, while the main action proceeds.

By-product (n.) A secondary or additional product; something produced, as in the course of a manufacture, in addition to the principal product.

Byre (n.) A cow house.

Byssaceous (a.) Byssuslike; consisting of fine fibers or threads, as some very delicate filamentous algae.

Byssus (n.) A cloth of exceedingly fine texture, used by the ancients. It is disputed whether it was of cotton, linen, or silk.

Byssus (n.) An obsolete name for certain fungi composed of slender threads.

Bystander (n.) One who stands near; a spectator; one who has no concern with the business transacting.

Byword (n.) A common saying; a proverb; a saying that has a general currency.

Byword (n.) The object of a contemptuous saying.

Bywork (n.) Work aside from regular work; subordinate or secondary business.

Byzantine (n.) A gold coin, so called from being coined at Byzantium. See Bezant.

C () C is the third letter of the English alphabet. It is from the Latin letter C, which in old Latin represented the sounds of k, and g (in go); its original value being the latter. In Anglo-Saxon words, or Old English before the Norman Conquest, it always has the sound of k. The Latin C was the same letter as the Greek /, /, and came from the Greek alphabet. The Greeks got it from the Ph/nicians. The English name of C is from the Latin name ce, and was derived, probably, through the French. Etymologically C is related to g, h, k, q, s (and other sibilant sounds). Examples of these relations are in L. acutus, E. acute, ague; E. acrid, eager, vinegar; L. cornu, E. horn; E. cat, kitten; E. coy, quiet; L. circare, OF. cerchier, E. search.

C () C after the clef is the mark of common time, in which each measure is a semibreve (four fourths or crotchets); for alla breve time it is written /.

Cab (n.) The covered part of a locomotive, in which the engineer has his station.

Cab (n.) A Hebrew dry measure, containing a little over two (2.37) pints.

Cabal (n.) A number of persons united in some close design, usually to promote their private views and interests in church or state by intrigue; a secret association composed of a few designing persons; a junto.

Cabala (n.) A kind of occult theosophy or traditional interpretation of the Scriptures among Jewish rabbis and certain mediaeval Christians, which treats of the nature of god and the mystery of human existence. It assumes that every letter, word, number, and accent of Scripture contains a hidden sense; and it teaches the methods of interpretation for ascertaining these occult meanings. The cabalists pretend even to foretell events by this means.

Cabalistical (a.) Of or pertaining to the cabala; containing or conveying an occult meaning; mystic.

Cabaret (n.) a type of restaurant where liquor and dinner is served, and entertainment is provided, as by musicians, dancers, or comedians, and providing space for dancing by the patrons; -- similar to a nightclub. The term cabaret is often used in the names of such an establishment.

Cabbage (n.) An esculent vegetable of many varieties, derived from the wild Brassica oleracea of Europe. The common cabbage has a compact head of leaves. The cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, etc., are sometimes classed as cabbages.

Caber (n.) A pole or beam used in Scottish games for tossing as a trial of strength.

Cabin (n.) A cottage or small house; a hut.

Cabin (v. t.) To confine in, or as in, a cabin.

Cabinet (n.) A hut; a cottage; a small house.

Cabinet (n.) A private room in which consultations are held.

Cabinet (n.) The advisory council of the chief executive officer of a nation; a cabinet council.

Cabinet (n.) A set of drawers or a cupboard intended to contain articles of value. Hence:

Cabinet (n.) A decorative piece of furniture, whether open like an etagere or closed with doors. See Etagere.

Cabinet (n.) Any building or room set apart for the safe keeping and exhibition of works of art, etc.; also, the collection itself.

Cable (n.) A large, strong rope or chain, of considerable length, used to retain a vessel at anchor, and for other purposes. It is made of hemp, of steel wire, or of iron links.

Cable (n.) A rope of steel wire, or copper wire, usually covered with some protecting or insulating substance; as, the cable of a suspension bridge; a telegraphic cable.

Cable (n.) A molding, shaft of a column, or any other member of convex, rounded section, made to resemble the spiral twist of a rope; -- called also cable molding.

Cabling (n.) The decoration of a fluted shaft of a column or of a pilaster with reeds, or rounded moldings, which seem to be laid in the hollows of the fluting. These are limited in length to about one third of the height of the shaft.

Caboodle (n.) The whole collection; the entire quantity or number; -- usually in the phrase the whole caboodle.

Caboose (n.) A house on deck, where the cooking is done; -- commonly called the galley.

Caboose (n.) A car used on freight or construction trains for brakemen, workmen, etc.; a tool car.

Cabotage (n.) Navigation along the coast; the details of coast pilotage.

Cabrerite (n.) An apple-green mineral, a hydrous arseniate of nickel, cobalt, and magnesia; -- so named from the Sierra Cabrera, Spain.

Cabrilla (n.) A name applied to various species of edible fishes of the genus Serranus, and related genera, inhabiting the Meditarranean, the coast of California, etc. In California, some of them are also called rock bass and kelp salmon.

Cachaemia (n.) A degenerated or poisoned condition of the blood.

Cacao (n.) A small evergreen tree (Theobroma Cacao) of South America and the West Indies. Its fruit contains an edible pulp, inclosing seeds about the size of an almond, from which cocoa, chocolate, and broma are prepared.

Cachalot (n.) The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus). It has in the top of its head a large cavity, containing an oily fluid, which, after death, concretes into a whitish crystalline substance called spermaceti. See Sperm whale.

Cache (n.) A hole in the ground, or hiding place, for concealing and preserving provisions which it is inconvenient to carry.

Cachexy (n.) A condition of ill health and impairment of nutrition due to impoverishment of the blood, esp. when caused by a specific morbid process (as cancer or tubercle).

Cachinnatory (a.) Consisting of, or accompanied by, immoderate laughter.

Cachou (n.) A silvered aromatic pill, used to correct the odor of the breath.

Cachunde (n.) A pastil or troche, composed of various aromatic and other ingredients, highly celebrated in India as an antidote, and as a stomachic and antispasmodic.

Cackerel (n.) The mendole; a small worthless Mediterranean fish considered poisonous by the ancients. See Mendole.

Cacochymia (n.) Alt. of Cacochymy

Cacochymy (n.) A vitiated state of the humors, or fluids, of the body, especially of the blood.

Cacochymic (a.) Alt. of Cacochymical

Cacochymical (a.) Having the fluids of the body vitiated, especially the blood.

Cacodemon (n.) An evil spirit; a devil or demon.

Cacodemon (n.) The nightmare.

Cacodoxical (a.) Heretical.

Cacodoxy (n.) Erroneous doctrine; heresy; heterodoxy.

Cacodyl (n.) Alkarsin; a colorless, poisonous, arsenical liquid, As2(CH3)4, spontaneously inflammable and possessing an intensely disagreeable odor. It is the type of a series of compounds analogous to the nitrogen compounds called hydrazines.

Cacodylic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, cacodyl.

Cacoethes (n.) A bad custom or habit; an insatiable desire; as, cacoethes scribendi, "The itch for writing".

Cacoethes (n.) A bad quality or disposition in a disease; an incurable ulcer.

Cacogastric (a.) Troubled with bad digestion.

Cacographic (a.) Pertaining to, or characterized by, cacography; badly written or spelled.

Cacography (n.) Incorrect or bad writing or spelling.

Cacolet (n.) A chair, litter, or other contrivance fitted to the back or pack saddle of a mule for carrying travelers in mountainous districts, or for the transportation of the sick and wounded of an army.

Cacology (n.) Bad speaking; bad choice or use of words.

Cacomixle (n.) Alt. of Cacomixl

Cacomixtle (n.) Alt. of Cacomixl

Cacomixl (n.) A North American carnivore (Bassaris astuta), about the size of a cat, related to the raccoons. It inhabits Mexico, Texas, and California.

Cacoon (n.) One of the seeds or large beans of a tropical vine (Entada scandens) used for making purses, scent bottles, etc.

Cacophonic (a.) Alt. of Cacophonious

Cacophonical (a.) Alt. of Cacophonious

Cacophonous (a.) Alt. of Cacophonious

Cacophonious (a.) Harsh-sounding.

Cacophonies (pl. ) of Cacophony

Cacophony (n.) An uncouth or disagreable sound of words, owing to the concurrence of harsh letters or syllables.

Cacophony (n.) A combination of discordant sounds.

Cacophony (n.) An unhealthy state of the voice.

Cacotechny (n.) A corruption or corrupt state of art.

Cacoxene (n.) Alt. of Cacoxenite

Cacoxenite (n.) A hydrous phosphate of iron occurring in yellow radiated tufts. The phosphorus seriously injures it as an iron ore.

Cactaceous (a.) Belonging to, or like, the family of plants of which the prickly pear is a common example.

Cacuminal (a.) Pertaining to the top of the palate; cerebral; -- applied to certain consonants; as, cacuminal (or cerebral) letters.

Cadaver (n.) A dead human body; a corpse.

Cadaveric (a.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a corpse, or the changes produced by death; cadaverous; as, cadaveric rigidity.

Cadaverous (a.) Having the appearance or color of a dead human body; pale; ghastly; as, a cadaverous look.

Caddis (n.) The larva of a caddice fly. These larvae generally live in cylindrical cases, open at each end, and covered externally with pieces of broken shells, gravel, bits of wood, etc. They are a favorite bait with anglers. Called also caddice worm, or caddis worm.

Cade (v. t.) To bring up or nourish by hand, or with tenderness; to coddle; to tame.

Cade (n.) A species of juniper (Juniperus Oxycedrus) of Mediterranean countries.

Cadence (n.) The close or fall of a strain; the point of rest, commonly reached by the immediate succession of the tonic to the dominant chord.

Cadency (n.) Descent of related families; distinction between the members of a family according to their ages.

Cadenza (n.) A parenthetic flourish or flight of ornament in the course of a piece, commonly just before the final cadence.

Cadet (n.) A gentleman who carries arms in a regiment, as a volunteer, with a view of acquiring military skill and obtaining a commission.

Cadetship (n.) The position, rank, or commission of a cadet; as, to get a cadetship.

Caddie (n.) A Scotch errand boy, porter, or messenger.

Cadillac (n.) A large pear, shaped like a flattened top, used chiefly for cooking.

Cadis (n.) A kind of coarse serge.

Cadmia (n.) An oxide of zinc which collects on the sides of furnaces where zinc is sublimed. Formerly applied to the mineral calamine.

Cadmic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, cadmium; as, cadmic sulphide.

Cadmium (n.) A comparatively rare element related to zinc, and occurring in some zinc ores. It is a white metal, both ductile and malleable. Symbol Cd. Atomic weight 111.8. It was discovered by Stromeyer in 1817, who named it from its association with zinc or zinc ore.

Caducary (a.) Relating to escheat, forfeiture, or confiscation.

Caduceus (n.) The official staff or wand of Hermes or Mercury, the messenger of the gods. It was originally said to be a herald's staff of olive wood, but was afterwards fabled to have two serpents coiled about it, and two wings at the top.

Caducous () Dropping off or disappearing early, as the calyx of a poppy, or the gills of a tadpole.

Caen stone () A cream-colored limestone for building, found near Caen, France.

Caesarism (n.) A system of government in which unrestricted power is exercised by a single person, to whom, as Caesar or emperor, it has been committed by the popular will; imperialism; also, advocacy or support of such a system of government.

Caesious (a.) Of the color of lavender; pale blue with a slight mixture of gray.

Caesium (n.) A rare alkaline metal found in mineral water; -- so called from the two characteristic blue lines in its spectrum. It was the first element discovered by spectrum analysis, and is the most strongly basic and electro-positive substance known. Symbol Cs. Atomic weight 132.6.

Caesura (n.) A metrical break in a verse, occurring in the middle of a foot and commonly near the middle of the verse; a sense pause in the middle of a foot. Also, a long syllable on which the caesural accent rests, or which is used as a foot.

Cafe (n.) A coffeehouse; a restaurant; also, a room in a hotel or restaurant where coffee and liquors are served.

Cafeneh (n.) A humble inn or house of rest for travelers, where coffee is sold.

Caffeic (a.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, coffee.

Caffeine (n.) A white, bitter, crystallizable substance, obtained from coffee. It is identical with the alkaloid theine from tea leaves, and with guaranine from guarana.

Caffetannic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, the tannin of coffee.

Caftan (n.) A garment worn throughout the Levant, consisting of a long gown with sleeves reaching below the hands. It is generally fastened by a belt or sash.

Cage (n.) A box or inclosure, wholly or partly of openwork, in wood or metal, used for confining birds or other animals.

Cage (n.) A place of confinement for malefactors

Cage (n.) A wirework strainer, used in connection with pumps and pipes.

Cage (v. i.) To confine in, or as in, a cage; to shut up or confine.

Cageling (n.) A bird confined in a cage; esp. a young bird.

Cagit (n.) A kind of parrot, of a beautiful green color, found in the Philippine Islands.

Cagmag (n.) A tough old goose; hence, coarse, bad food of any kind.

Cahincic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, cahinca, the native name of a species of Brazilian Chiococca, perhaps C. racemosa; as, cahincic acid.

Cairn (n.) A rounded or conical heap of stones erected by early inhabitants of the British Isles, apparently as a sepulchral monument.

Cairngormstone () A yellow or smoky brown variety of rock crystal, or crystallized quartz, found esp, in the mountain of Cairngorm, in Scotland.

Caisson (n.) A four-wheeled carriage for conveying ammunition, consisting of two parts, a body and a limber. In light field batteries there is one caisson to each piece, having two ammunition boxes on the body, and one on the limber.

Caitiff (a.) Base; wicked and mean; cowardly; despicable.

Cajuput (n.) A highly stimulating volatile inflammable oil, distilled from the leaves of an East Indian tree (Melaleuca cajuputi, etc.) It is greenish in color and has a camphoraceous odor and pungent taste.

Cajuputene (n.) A colorless or greenish oil extracted from cajuput.

Cake (n.) A sweetened composition of flour and other ingredients, leavened or unleavened, baked in a loaf or mass of any size or shape.

Cake (n.) A mass of matter concreted, congealed, or molded into a solid mass of any form, esp. into a form rather flat than high; as, a cake of soap; an ague cake.

Cake (v. i.) To concrete or consolidate into a hard mass, as dough in an oven; to coagulate.

Caking coal () See Coal.

Calabar (n.) A district on the west coast of Africa.

Calabash (n.) The common gourd (plant or fruit).

Calamanco (n.) A glossy woolen stuff, plain, striped, or checked.

Calamander wood () A valuable furniture wood from India and Ceylon, of a hazel-brown color, with black stripes, very hard in texture. It is a species of ebony, and is obtained from the Diospyros quaesita. Called also Coromandel wood.

Calamary (n.) A cephalopod, belonging to the genus Loligo and related genera. There are many species. They have a sack of inklike fluid which they discharge from the siphon tube, when pursued or alarmed, in order to confuse their enemies. Their shell is a thin horny plate, within the flesh of the back, shaped very much like a quill pen. In America they are called squids. See Squid.

Calambour (n.) A species of agalloch, or aloes wood, of a dusky or mottled color, of a light, friable texture, and less fragrant than calambac; -- used by cabinetmakers.

Calamistrum (n.) A comblike structure on the metatarsus of the hind legs of certain spiders (Ciniflonidae), used to curl certain fibers in the construction of their webs.

Calamite (n.) A fossil plant of the coal formation, having the general form of plants of the modern Equiseta (the Horsetail or Scouring Rush family) but sometimes attaining the height of trees, and having the stem more or less woody within. See Acrogen, and Asterophyllite.

Calamity (n.) Any great misfortune or cause of misery; -- generally applied to events or disasters which produce extensive evil, either to communities or individuals.

Calamus (n.) The indian cane, a plant of the Palm family. It furnishes the common rattan. See Rattan, and Dragon's blood.

Calamus (n.) A species of Acorus (A. calamus), commonly called calamus, or sweet flag. The root has a pungent, aromatic taste, and is used in medicine as a stomachic; the leaves have an aromatic odor, and were formerly used instead of rushes to strew on floors.

Calash (n.) A hood, formerly worn by ladies, which could be drawn forward or thrown back like the top of a carriage.

Calcar (n.) A kind of oven, or reverberatory furnace, used for the calcination of sand and potash, and converting them into frit.

Calcar (n.) A hollow tube or spur at the base of a petal or corolla.

Calcareo-argillaceous (a.) consisting of, or containing, calcareous and argillaceous earths.

Calcareo-bituminous (a.) Consisting of, or containing, lime and bitumen.

Calcareo-siliceous (a.) Consisting of, or containing calcareous and siliceous earths.

Calcareous (a.) Partaking of the nature of calcite or calcium carbonate; consisting of, or containing, calcium carbonate or carbonate of lime.

Calcic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, calcium or lime.

Calciferous (a.) Bearing, producing, or containing calcite, or carbonate of lime.

Calcified (a.) Consisting of, or containing, calcareous matter or lime salts; calcareous.

Calcify (v. i.) To become changed into a stony or calcareous condition, in which lime is a principal ingredient, as in the formation of teeth.

Calcigenous (a.) Tending to form, or to become, a calx or earthlike substance on being oxidized or burnt; as magnesium, calcium. etc.

Calcimine (n.) A white or colored wash for the ceiling or other plastering of a room, consisting of a mixture of clear glue, Paris white or zinc white, and water.

Calcimine (v. t.) To wash or cover with calcimine; as, to calcimine walls.

Calcine (v. i.) To be converted into a powder or friable substance, or into a calx, by the action of heat.

Calcispongiae (n. pl.) An order of marine sponges, containing calcareous spicules. See Porifera.

Calcite (n.) Calcium carbonate, or carbonate of lime. It is rhombohedral in its crystallization, and thus distinguished from aragonite. It includes common limestone, chalk, and marble. Called also calc-spar and calcareous spar.

Calcium (n.) An elementary substance; a metal which combined with oxygen forms lime. It is of a pale yellow color, tenacious, and malleable. It is a member of the alkaline earth group of elements. Atomic weight 40. Symbol Ca.

Calcographer (n.) One who practices calcography.

Calcographic (a.) Alt. of Calcographical

Calcographical (a.) Relating to, or in the style of, calcography.

Calcography (n.) The art of drawing with chalk.

Calculary (n.) A congeries of little stony knots found in the pulp of the pear and other fruits.

Calculate (v. i.) To ascertain or determine by mathematical processes, usually by the ordinary rules of arithmetic; to reckon up; to estimate; to compute.

Calculate (v. i.) To ascertain or predict by mathematical or astrological computations the time, circumstances, or other conditions of; to forecast or compute the character or consequences of; as, to calculate or cast one's nativity.

Calculate (v. i.) To make a calculation; to forecast consequences; to estimate; to compute.

Calculated (p. p. & a.) Worked out by calculation; as calculated tables for computing interest; ascertained or conjectured as a result of calculation; as, the calculated place of a planet; the calculated velocity of a cannon ball.

Calculated (p. p. & a.) Adapted by calculation, contrivance. or forethought to accomplish a purpose; as, to use arts calculated to deceive the people.

Calculating (a.) Given to contrivance or forethought; forecasting; scheming; as, a cool calculating disposition.

Calculating (n.) The act or process of making mathematical computations or of estimating results.

Calculation (n.) The act or process, or the result, of calculating; computation; reckoning, estimate.

Calculator (n.) One who computes or reckons: one who estimates or considers the force and effect of causes, with a view to form a correct estimate of the effects.

Calcule (n.) Reckoning; computation.

Calculous (a.) Of the nature of a calculus; like stone; gritty; as, a calculous concretion.

Calculus (n.) Any solid concretion, formed in any part of the body, but most frequent in the organs that act as reservoirs, and in the passages connected with them; as, biliary calculi; urinary calculi, etc.

Calculus (n.) A method of computation; any process of reasoning by the use of symbols; any branch of mathematics that may involve calculation.

Caldron (n.) A large kettle or boiler of copper, brass, or iron. [Written also cauldron.]

Caledonia (n.) The ancient Latin name of Scotland; -- still used in poetry.

Caledonian (a.) Of or pertaining to Caledonia or Scotland; Scottish; Scotch.

Caledonian (n.) A native or inhabitant of Caledonia or Scotland.

Caledonite (n.) A hydrous sulphate of copper and lead, found in some parts of Caledonia or Scotland.

Calefaction (n.) The act of warming or heating; the production of heat in a body by the action of fire, or by communication of heat from other bodies.

Calefactory (a.) Making hot; producing or communicating heat.

Calefactory (n.) A hollow sphere of metal, filled with hot water, or a chafing dish, placed on the altar in cold weather for the priest to warm his hands with.

Calendar (n.) A tabular statement of the dates of feasts, offices, saints' days, etc., esp. of those which are liable to change yearly according to the varying date of Easter.

Calendar (n.) An orderly list or enumeration of persons, things, or events; a schedule; as, a calendar of state papers; a calendar of bills presented in a legislative assembly; a calendar of causes arranged for trial in court; a calendar of a college or an academy.

Calender (n.) A machine, used for the purpose of giving cloth, paper, etc., a smooth, even, and glossy or glazed surface, by cold or hot pressure, or for watering them and giving them a wavy appearance. It consists of two or more cylinders revolving nearly in contact, with the necessary apparatus for moving and regulating.

Calendula (n.) A genus of composite herbaceous plants. One species, Calendula officinalis, is the common marigold, and was supposed to blossom on the calends of every month, whence the name.

Calenture (n.) A name formerly given to various fevers occuring in tropics; esp. to a form of furious delirium accompanied by fever, among sailors, which sometimes led the affected person to imagine the sea to be a green field, and to throw himself into it.

Calf (n.) The young of the cow, or of the Bovine family of quadrupeds. Also, the young of some other mammals, as of the elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus, and whale.

Calf (n.) Leather made of the skin of the calf; especially, a fine, light-colored leather used in bookbinding; as, to bind books in calf.

Calibre (n.) The diameter of round or cylindrical body, as of a bullet or column.

Calibre (n.) Fig.: Capacity or compass of mind.

Calicle (n.) One of the small cuplike cavities, often with elevated borders, covering the surface of most corals. Each is formed by a polyp. (b) One of the cuplike structures inclosing the zooids of certain hydroids. See Campanularian.

Calicoes (pl. ) of Calico

Calico (n.) Plain white cloth made from cotton, but which receives distinctive names according to quality and use, as, super calicoes, shirting calicoes, unbleached calicoes, etc.

Calico (n.) Cotton cloth printed with a figured pattern.

Calico (a.) Made of, or having the appearance of, calico; -- often applied to an animal, as a horse or cat, on whose body are large patches of a color strikingly different from its main color.

Calicoback (n.) The calico bass.

Calicoback (n.) An hemipterous insect (Murgantia histrionica) which injures the cabbage and other garden plants; -- called also calico bug and harlequin cabbage bug.

Caliduct (n.) A pipe or duct used to convey hot air or steam.

Caligo (n.) Dimness or obscurity of sight, dependent upon a speck on the cornea; also, the speck itself.

Calipash (n.) A part of a turtle which is next to the upper shell. It contains a fatty and gelatinous substance of a dull greenish tinge, much esteemed as a delicacy in preparations of turtle.

Calipee (n.) A part of a turtle which is attached to the lower shell. It contains a fatty and gelatinous substance of a light yellowish color, much esteemed as a delicacy.

Calipers (n. pl.) An instrument, usually resembling a pair of dividers or compasses with curved legs, for measuring the diameter or thickness of bodies, as of work shaped in a lathe or planer, timber, masts, shot, etc.; or the bore of firearms, tubes, etc.; -- called also caliper compasses, or caliber compasses.

Calk (v. t.) To drive tarred oakum into the seams between the planks of (a ship, boat, etc.), to prevent leaking. The calking is completed by smearing the seams with melted pitch.

Calk (v. t.) To copy, as a drawing, by rubbing the back of it with red or black chalk, and then passing a blunt style or needle over the lines, so as to leave a tracing on the paper or other thing against which it is laid or held.

Calking (n.) The act or process of making seems tight, as in ships, or of furnishing with calks, as a shoe, or copying, as a drawing.

Call (v. t.) To command or request to come or be present; to summon; as, to call a servant.

Call (v. t.) To invite or command to meet; to convoke; -- often with together; as, the President called Congress together; to appoint and summon; as, to call a meeting of the Board of Aldermen.

Call (v. t.) To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off; as, to call, or call off, the items of an account; to call the roll of a military company.

Call (n.) A short visit; as, to make a call on a neighbor; also, the daily coming of a tradesman to solicit orders.

Call (n.) A note blown on the horn to encourage the hounds.

Call (n.) A reference to, or statement of, an object, course, distance, or other matter of description in a survey or grant requiring or calling for a corresponding object, etc., on the land.

Call (n.) The privilege to demand the delivery of stock, grain, or any commodity, at a fixed, price, at or within a certain time agreed on.

Calle (n.) A kind of head covering; a caul.

Caller (a.) Fresh; in good condition; as, caller berrings.

Callet (n.) A trull or prostitute; a scold or gossip.

Callet (v. i.) To rail or scold.

Calling (n.) A summoning or convocation, as of Parliament.

Calling (n.) The persons, collectively, engaged in any particular professions or employment.

Calliope (n.) A musical instrument consisting of a series of steam whistles, toned to the notes of the scale, and played by keys arranged like those of an organ. It is sometimes attached to steamboat boilers.

Callithump (n.) A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.

Callosity (n.) A hard or thickened spot or protuberance; a hardening and thickening of the skin or bark of a part, eps. as a result of continued pressure or friction.

Callosum (n.) The great band commissural fibers which unites the two cerebral hemispheres. See corpus callosum, under Carpus.

Callot (n.) A plant coif or skullcap. Same as Calotte.

Callus (n.) The material of repair in fractures of bone; a substance exuded at the site of fracture, which is at first soft or cartilaginous in consistence, but is ultimately converted into true bone and unites the fragments into a single piece.

Calorescence (n.) The conversion of obscure radiant heat into light; the transmutation of rays of heat into others of higher refrangibility.

Caloric (n.) The principle of heat, or the agent to which the phenomena of heat and combustion were formerly ascribed; -- not now used in scientific nomenclature, but sometimes used as a general term for heat.

Caloriduct (n.) A tube or duct for conducting heat; a caliduct.

Calorie (n.) The unit of heat according to the French standard; the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one kilogram (sometimes, one gram) of water one degree centigrade, or from 0¡ to 1¡. Compare the English standard unit, Foot pound.

Calorifere (n.) An apparatus for conveying and distributing heat, especially by means of hot water circulating in tubes.

Calorimeter (n.) An apparatus for measuring the amount of heat contained in bodies or developed by some mechanical or chemical process, as friction, chemical combination, combustion, etc.

Calorimeter (n.) An apparatus for measuring the proportion of unevaporated water contained in steam.

Caltrap (n.) A genus of herbaceous plants (Tribulus) of the order Zygophylleae, having a hard several-celled fruit, armed with stout spines, and resembling the military instrument of the same name. The species grow in warm countries, and are often very annoying to cattle.

Calumet (n.) A kind of pipe, used by the North American Indians for smoking tobacco. The bowl is usually made of soft red stone, and the tube is a long reed often ornamented with feathers.

Calvary (n.) A representation of the crucifixion, consisting of three crosses with the figures of Christ and the thieves, often as large as life, and sometimes surrounded by figures of other personages who were present at the crucifixion.

Calvinize (v. t.) To convert to Calvinism.

Calx (n.) The substance which remains when a metal or mineral has been subjected to calcination or combustion by heat, and which is, or may be, reduced to a fine powder.

Callyciflorous (a.) Having the petals and stamens adnate to the calyx; -- applied to a subclass of dicotyledonous plants in the system of the French botanist Candolle.

Calycozoa (n. pl.) A group of acalephs of which Lucernaria is the type. The body is cup-shaped with eight marginal lobes bearing clavate tentacles. An aboral sucker serves for attachment. The interior is divided into four large compartments. See Lucernarida.

Calypso (n.) A small and beautiful species of orchid, having a flower variegated with purple, pink, and yellow. It grows in cold and wet localities in the northern part of the United States. The Calypso borealis is the only orchid which reaches 68¡ N.

Calyptra (n.) A little hood or veil, resembling an extinguisher in form and position, covering each of the small flasklike capsules which contain the spores of mosses; also, any similar covering body.

Calyx (n.) The covering of a flower. See Flower.

Cam (n.) A turning or sliding piece which, by the shape of its periphery or face, or a groove in its surface, imparts variable or intermittent motion to, or receives such motion from, a rod, lever, or block brought into sliding or rolling contact with it.

Camaieu (n.) Painting in shades of one color; monochrome.

Camarilla (n.) A company of secret and irresponsible advisers, as of a king; a cabal or clique.

Camass (n.) A blue-flowered liliaceous plant (Camassia esculenta) of northwestern America, the bulbs of which are collected for food by the Indians.

Camber (n.) An upward convexity of a deck or other surface; as, she has a high camber (said of a vessel having an unusual convexity of deck).

Camber (n.) An upward concavity in the under side of a beam, girder, or lintel; also, a slight upward concavity in a straight arch. See Hogback.

Camber (v. t.) To cut bend to an upward curve; to construct, as a deck, with an upward curve.

Cambial (a.) Belonging to exchanges in commerce; of exchange.

Cambric (n.) A fabric made, in imitation of linen cambric, of fine, hardspun cotton, often with figures of various colors; -- also called cotton cambric, and cambric muslin.

Camera lucida () An instrument which by means of a prism of a peculiar form, or an arrangement of mirrors, causes an apparent image of an external object or objects to appear as if projected upon a plane surface, as of paper or canvas, so that the outlines may conveniently traced. It is generally used with the microscope.

Camera obscura () An apparatus in which the images of external objects, formed by a convex lens or a concave mirror, are thrown on a paper or other white surface placed in the focus of the lens or mirror within a darkened chamber, or box, so that the outlines may be traced.

Camera obscura () An apparatus in which the image of an external object or objects is, by means of lenses, thrown upon a sensitized plate or surface placed at the back of an extensible darkened box or chamber variously modified; -- commonly called simply the camera.

Cameronian (n.) A follower of the Rev. Richard Cameron, a Scotch Covenanter of the time of Charles II.

Camisado (n.) A shirt worn by soldiers over their uniform, in order to be able to recognize one another in a night attack.

Camlet (n.) A woven fabric originally made of camel's hair, now chiefly of goat's hair and silk, or of wool and cotton.

Chamomile (n.) A genus of herbs (Anthemis) of the Composite family. The common camomile, A. nobilis, is used as a popular remedy. Its flowers have a strong and fragrant and a bitter, aromatic taste. They are tonic, febrifugal, and in large doses emetic, and the volatile oil is carminative.

Camp (n.) A collection of tents, huts, etc., for shelter, commonly arranged in an orderly manner.

Camp (n.) The company or body of persons encamped, as of soldiers, of surveyors, of lumbermen, etc.

Campagna (n.) An open level tract of country; especially "Campagna di Roma." The extensive undulating plain which surrounds Rome.

Campaign (n.) An open field; a large, open plain without considerable hills. SeeChampaign.

Campaign (n.) A connected series of military operations forming a distinct stage in a war; the time during which an army keeps the field.

Campaign (n.) The period during which a blast furnace is continuously in operation.

Campania (n.) Open country.

Camphine (n.) Rectified oil of turpentine, used for burning in lamps, and as a common solvent in varnishes.

Camphoraceous (a.) Of the nature of camphor; containing camphor.

Campus (n.) The principal grounds of a college or school, between the buildings or within the main inclosure; as, the college campus.

Canal coal () See Cannel coal.

Canary (a.) Of a pale yellowish color; as, Canary stone.

Canary (n.) A pale yellow color, like that of a canary bird.

Canary bird () A small singing bird of the Finch family (Serinus Canarius), a native of the Canary Islands. It was brought to Europe in the 16th century, and made a household pet. It generally has a yellowish body with the wings and tail greenish, but in its wild state it is more frequently of gray or brown color. It is sometimes called canary finch.

Canaster (n.) A kind of tobacco for smoking, made of the dried leaves, coarsely broken; -- so called from the rush baskets in which it is packed in South America.

Cancan (n.) A rollicking French dance, accompanied by indecorous or extravagant postures and gestures.

Canceleer (n.) The turn of a hawk upon the wing to recover herself, when she misses her aim in the stoop.

Cancellate (v. t.) Having the surface coveres with raised lines, crossing at right angles.

Cancellation (n.) The act, process, or result of canceling; as, the cansellation of certain words in a contract, or of the contract itself.

Cancellation (n.) The operation of striking out common factors, in both the dividend and divisor.

Cancelli (v. t.) An interwoven or latticed wall or inclosure; latticework, rails, or crossbars, as around the bar of a court of justice, between the chancel and the nave of a church, or in a window.

Cancelli (v. t.) The interlacing osseous plates constituting the elastic porous tissue of certain parts of the bones, esp. in their articular extremities.

Cancer (n.) A genus of decapod Crustacea, including some of the most common shore crabs of Europe and North America, as the rock crab, Jonah crab, etc. See Crab.

Cancer (n.) The fourth of the twelve signs of the zodiac. The first point is the northern limit of the sun's course in summer; hence, the sign of the summer solstice. See Tropic.

Cancer (n.) A northern constellation between Gemini and Leo.

Cancer (n.) Formerly, any malignant growth, esp. one attended with great pain and ulceration, with cachexia and progressive emaciation. It was so called, perhaps, from the great veins which surround it, compared by the ancients to the claws of a crab. The term is now restricted to such a growth made up of aggregations of epithelial cells, either without support or embedded in the meshes of a trabecular framework.

Cancerate (v. i.) To grow into a canser; to become cancerous.

Canceration (n.) The act or state of becoming cancerous or growing into a cancer.

Cancrinite (n.) A mineral occurring in hexagonal crystals, also massive, generally of a yellow color, containing silica, alumina, lime, soda, and carbon dioxide.

Canderos (n.) An East Indian resin, of a pellucid white color, from which small ornaments and toys are sometimes made.

Candid (a.) Free from undue bias; disposed to think and judge according to truth and justice, or without partiality or prejudice; fair; just; impartial; as, a candid opinion.

Candidate (n.) One who offers himself, or is put forward by others, as a suitable person or an aspirant or contestant for an office, privilege, or honor; as, a candidate for the office of governor; a candidate for holy orders; a candidate for scholastic honors.

Candify (v. t. / v. i.) To make or become white, or candied.

Candite (n.) A variety of spinel, of a dark color, found at Candy, in Ceylon.

Candle (n.) A slender, cylindrical body of tallow, containing a wick composed of loosely twisted linen of cotton threads, and used to furnish light.

Candleberry tree () A shrub (the Myrica cerifera, or wax-bearing myrtle), common in North America, the little nuts of which are covered with a greenish white wax, which was formerly, used for hardening candles; -- also called bayberry tree, bayberry, or candleberry.

Candlebomb (n.) A pasteboard shell used in signaling. It is filled with a composition which makes a brilliant light when it explodes.

Candle coal () See Cannel coal.

Candlefish (n.) A marine fish (Thaleichthys Pacificus), allied to the smelt, found on the north Pacific coast; -- called also eulachon. It is so oily that, when dried, it may be used as a candle, by drawing a wick through it

Candlemas (n.) The second day of February, on which is celebrated the feast of the Purification of the Virgin Mary; -- so called because the candles for the altar or other sacred uses are blessed on that day.

Candlewaster (n.) One who consumes candles by being up late for study or dissipation.

Candor (n.) Whiteness; brightness; (as applied to moral conditions) usullied purity; innocence.

Candroy (n.) A machine for spreading out cotton cloths to prepare them for printing.

Candy (v. t.) To conserve or boil in sugar; as, to candy fruits; to candy ginger.

Candy (v. t.) A more or less solid article of confectionery made by boiling sugar or molasses to the desired consistency, and than crystallizing, molding, or working in the required shape. It is often flavored or colored, and sometimes contains fruit, nuts, etc.

Candytuft (n.) An annual plant of the genus Iberis, cultivated in gardens. The name was originally given to the I. umbellata, first, discovered in the island of Candia.

Cane (n.) A name given to several peculiar palms, species of Calamus and Daemanorops, having very long, smooth flexible stems, commonly called rattans.

Caned (a.) Filled with white flakes; mothery; -- said vinegar when containing mother.

Canescent (a.) Growing white, or assuming a color approaching to white.

Can hook () A device consisting of a short rope with flat hooks at each end, for hoisting casks or barrels by the ends of the staves.

Canister (n.) A small box or case for holding tea, coffee, etc.

Canker (n.) A corroding or sloughing ulcer; esp. a spreading gangrenous ulcer or collection of ulcers in or about the mouth; -- called also water canker, canker of the mouth, and noma.

Canker (n.) Anything which corrodes, corrupts, or destroy.

Canker (v. t.) To affect as a canker; to eat away; to corrode; to consume.

Canker (v. t.) To infect or pollute; to corrupt.

Canker (v. i.) To be or become diseased, or as if diseased, with canker; to grow corrupt; to become venomous.

Cannabene (n.) A colorless oil obtained from hemp by distillation, and possessing its intoxicating properties.

Cannabin (n.) A poisonous resin extracted from hemp (Cannabis sativa, variety Indica). The narcotic effects of hasheesh are due to this resin.

Cannel coal () A kind of mineral coal of a black color, sufficiently hard and solid to be cut and polished. It burns readily, with a clear, yellow flame, and on this account has been used as a substitute for candles.

Cannonade (n.) The act of discharging cannon and throwing ball, shell, etc., for the purpose of destroying an army, or battering a town, ship, or fort; -- usually, an attack of some continuance.

Cannonry (n.) Cannon, collectively; artillery.

Canon (n.) A law, or rule of doctrine or discipline, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope or the sovereign; a decision, regulation, code, or constitution made by ecclesiastical authority.

Canon (n.) The collection of books received as genuine Holy Scriptures, called the sacred canon, or general rule of moral and religious duty, given by inspiration; the Bible; also, any one of the canonical Scriptures. See Canonical books, under Canonical, a.

Canon (n.) In monasteries, a book containing the rules of a religious order.

Canon (n.) A member of a cathedral chapter; a person who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.

Canon (n.) A musical composition in which the voices begin one after another, at regular intervals, successively taking up the same subject. It either winds up with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each voice finishes, commences anew, thus forming a perpetual fugue or round. It is the strictest form of imitation. See Imitation.

Ca–on (n.) A deep gorge, ravine, or gulch, between high and steep banks, worn by water courses.

Canon bone () The shank bone, or great bone above the fetlock, in the fore and hind legs of the horse and allied animals, corresponding to the middle metacarpal or metatarsal bone of most mammals. See Horse.

Canoness (n.) A woman who holds a canonry in a conventual chapter.

Cannonical (a.) Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a , canon or canons.

Canonically (adv.) In a canonical manner; according to the canons.

Canonization (n.) The final process or decree (following beatifacation) by which the name of a deceased person is placed in the catalogue (canon) of saints and commended to perpetual veneration and invocation.

Canonry (n. pl.) A benefice or prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church; a right to a place in chapter and to a portion of its revenues; the dignity or emoluments of a canon.

Canopus (n.) A star of the first magnitude in the southern constellation Argo.

Canopy (n.) A covering fixed over a bed, dais, or the like, or carried on poles over an exalted personage or a sacred object, etc. chiefly as a mark of honor.

Canopy (n.) Also, a rooflike covering, supported on pillars over an altar, a statue, a fountain, etc.

Canopy (v. t.) To cover with, or as with, a canopy.

Cant (n.) A corner; angle; niche.

Cant (n.) A segment of he rim of a wooden cogwheel.

Can't () A colloquial contraction for can not.

Cantalever (n.) A bracket to support a balcony, a cornice, or the like.

Cantaloupe (n.) A muskmelon of several varieties, having when mature, a yellowish skin, and flesh of a reddish orange color.

Cantankerous (a.) Perverse; contentious; ugly; malicious.

Cantata (n.) A poem set to music; a musical composition comprising choruses, solos, interludes, etc., arranged in a somewhat dramatic manner; originally, a composition for a single noise, consisting of both recitative and melody.

Canteen (n.) The sutler's shop in a garrison; also, a chest containing culinary and other vessels for officers.

Canterbury (n.) A city in England, giving its name various articles. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury (primate of all England), and contains the shrine of Thomas a Becket, to which pilgrimages were formerly made.

Cantharis (n.) A beetle (Lytta, / Cantharis, vesicatoria), havin1g an elongated cylindrical body of a brilliant green color, and a nauseous odor; the blister fly or blister beetle, of the apothecary; -- also called Spanish fly. Many other species of Lytta, used for the same purpose, take the same name. See Blister beetle, under Blister. The plural form in usually applied to the dried insects used in medicine.

Canthus (n.) The corner where the upper and under eyelids meet on each side of the eye.

Canticoy (n.) A social gathering; usually, one for dancing.

Cantle (n.) A corner or edge of anything; a piece; a fragment; a part.

Cantlet (n.) A piece; a fragment; a corner.

Canton (n.) A small portion; a division; a compartment.

Canton (n.) A small community or clan.

Canton crape () A soft, white or colored silk fabric, of a gauzy texture and wavy appearance, used for ladies' scarfs, shawls, bonnet trimmings, etc.; -- called also Oriental crape.

Cantoned (a.) Having a charge in each of the four corners; -- said of a cross on a shield, and also of the shield itself.

Cantoned (a.) Having the angles marked by, or decorated with, projecting moldings or small columns; as, a cantoned pier or pilaster.

Cantoon (n.) A cotton stuff showing a fine cord on one side and a satiny surface on the other.

Cantref (n.) A district comprising a hundred villages, as in Wales.

Canuck (n.) A small or medium-sized hardy horse, common in Canada.

Canvas (n.) A strong cloth made of hemp, flax, or cotton; -- used for tents, sails, etc.

Canvas (n.) A coarse cloth so woven as to form regular meshes for working with the needle, as in tapestry, or worsted work.

Canvas (n.) A piece of strong cloth of which the surface has been prepared to receive painting, commonly painting in oil.

Canvas (n.) Something for which canvas is used: (a) A sail, or a collection of sails. (b) A tent, or a collection of tents. (c) A painting, or a picture on canvas.

Canvas (n.) A rough draft or model of a song, air, or other literary or musical composition; esp. one to show a poet the measure of the verses he is to make.

Canvas (a.) Made of, pertaining to, or resembling, canvas or coarse cloth; as, a canvas tent.

Canvass (v. i.) To search thoroughly; to engage in solicitation by traversing a district; as, to canvass for subscriptions or for votes; to canvass for a book, a publisher, or in behalf of a charity; -- commonly followed by for.

Cap (n.) A covering for the head

Cap (n.) A respectful uncovering of the head.

Cap (n.) The uppermost of any assemblage of parts; as, the cap of column, door, etc.; a capital, coping, cornice, lintel, or plate.

Cap (n.) Something covering the top or end of a thing for protection or ornament.

Cap (n.) A collar of iron or wood used in joining spars, as the mast and the topmast, the bowsprit and the jib boom; also, a covering of tarred canvas at the end of a rope.

Cap (n.) The removable cover of a journal box.

Cap (n.) A portion of a spherical or other convex surface.

Cap (v. t.) To cover with a cap, or as with a cap; to provide with a cap or cover; to cover the top or end of; to place a cap upon the proper part of; as, to cap a post; to cap a gun.

Cap (v. t.) To complete; to crown; to bring to the highest point or consummation; as, to cap the climax of absurdity.

Cap (v. t.) To match; to mate in contest; to furnish a complement to; as, to cap text; to cap proverbs.

Cap (v. i.) To uncover the head respectfully.

Capable (a.) Possessing adequate power; qualified; able; fully competent; as, a capable instructor; a capable judge; a mind capable of nice investigations.

Capable (a.) Possessing legal power or capacity; as, a man capable of making a contract, or a will.

Capable (a.) Capacious; large; comprehensive.

Capableness (n.) The quality or state of being capable; capability; adequateness; competency.

Capacious (a.) Having capacity; able to contain much; large; roomy; spacious; extended; broad; as, a capacious vessel, room, bay, or harbor.

Capacious (a.) Able or qualified to make large views of things, as in obtaining knowledge or forming designs; comprehensive; liberal.

Capaciosly (adv.) In a capacious manner or degree; comprehensively.

Capacity (n.) The power of receiving or containing; extent of room or space; passive power; -- used in reference to physical things.

Capacity (n.) The power of receiving and holding ideas, knowledge, etc.; the comprehensiveness of the mind; the receptive faculty; capability of undestanding or feeling.

Capacity (n.) Outward condition or circumstances; occupation; profession; character; position; as, to work in the capacity of a mason or a carpenter.

Capacity (n.) Legal or noral qualification, as of age, residence, character, etc., necessary for certain purposes, as for holding office, for marrying, for making contracts, will, etc.; legal power or right; competency.

Caparison (n.) An ornamental covering or housing for a horse; the harness or trappings of a horse, taken collectively, esp. when decorative.

Caparison (v. t.) To cover with housings, as a horse; to harness or fit out with decorative trappings, as a horse.

Cape (n.) A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into the sea or a lake; a promontory; a headland.

Cape (v. i.) To head or point; to keep a course; as, the ship capes southwest by south.

Capel (n.) A composite stone (quartz, schorl, and hornblende) in the walls of tin and copper lodes.

Capelin (n.) A small marine fish (Mallotus villosus) of the family Salmonidae, very abundant on the coasts of Greenland, Iceland, Newfoundland, and Alaska. It is used as a bait for the cod.

Capella (n.) A brilliant star in the constellation Auriga.

Caperberry (n.) The small olive-shaped berry of the European and Oriental caper, said to be used in pickles and as a condiment.

Capercally (n.) A species of grouse (Tetrao uragallus) of large size and fine flavor, found in northern Europe and formerly in Scotland; -- called also cock of the woods.

Capias (n.) A writ or process commanding the officer to take the body of the person named in it, that is, to arrest him; -- also called writ of capias.

Capillament (n.) Any villous or hairy covering; a fine fiber or filament, as of the nerves.

Capillarity (n.) The quality or condition of being capillary.

Capillarity (n.) The peculiar action by which the surface of a liquid, where it is in contact with a solid (as in a capillary tube), is elevated or depressed; capillary attraction.

Capillary (n.) A minute, thin-walled vessel; particularly one of the smallest blood vessels connecting arteries and veins, but used also for the smallest lymphatic and biliary vessels.

Capistrate (a.) Hooded; cowled.

Capital (n.) The head or uppermost member of a column, pilaster, etc. It consists generally of three parts, abacus, bell (or vase), and necking. See these terms, and Column.

Capital (n.) The seat of government; the chief city or town in a country; a metropolis.

Capital (n.) Money, property, or stock employed in trade, manufactures, etc.; the sum invested or lent, as distinguished from the income or interest. See Capital stock, under Capital, a.

Capitalize (v. t.) To convert into capital, or to use as capital.

Capitalize (v. t.) To compute, appraise, or assess the capital value of (a patent right, an annuity, etc.)

Capitellate (a.) Having a very small knoblike termination, or collected into minute capitula.

Capitibranchiata (n. pl.) A division of annelids in which the gills arise from or near the head. See Tubicola.

Capitulary (n.) The body of laws or statutes of a chapter, or of an ecclesiastical council.

Capitulary (n.) A collection of laws or statutes, civil and ecclesiastical, esp. of the Frankish kings, in chapters or sections.

Capitulate (v. t.) To surrender or transfer, as an army or a fortress, on certain conditions.

Capitulation (n.) The instrument containing the terms of an agreement or surrender.

Capitulum (n.) A thick head of flowers on a very short axis, as a clover top, or a dandelion; a composite flower. A capitulum may be either globular or flat.

Capling (n.) The cap or coupling of a flail, through which the thongs pass which connect the handle and swingel.

Capnomor (n.) A limpid, colorless oil with a peculiar odor, obtained from beech tar.

Capoc (n.) A sort of cotton so short and fine that it can not be spun, used in the East Indies to line palanquins, to make mattresses, etc.

Capoch (v. t.) To cover with, or as with, a hood; hence, to hoodwink or blind.

Capon (n.) A castrated cock, esp. when fattened; a male chicken gelded to improve his flesh for the table.

Caponiere (n.) A work made across or in the ditch, to protect it from the enemy, or to serve as a covered passageway.

Capot (n.) A winning of all the tricks at the game of piquet. It counts for forty points.

Capote (n.) A long cloak or overcoat, especially one with a hood.

Cappadine (n.) A floss or waste obtained from the cocoon after the silk has been reeled off, used for shag.

Cappeak (n.) The front piece of a cap; -- now more commonly called visor.

Capper (n.) A by-bidder; a decoy for gamblers [Slang, U. S.].

Capra (n.) A genus of ruminants, including the common goat.

Capricorn (n.) The tenth sign of zodiac, into which the sun enters at the winter solstice, about December 21. See Tropic.

Capricorn (n.) A southern constellation, represented on ancient monuments by the figure of a goat, or a figure with its fore part like a fish.

Capsaicin (n.) A colorless crystalline substance extracted from the Capsicum annuum, and giving off vapors of intense acridity.

Capsicum (n.) A genus of plants of many species, producing capsules or dry berries of various forms, which have an exceedingly pungent, biting taste, and when ground form the red or Cayenne pepper of commerce.

Capsquare (n.) A metal covering plate which passes over the trunnions of a cannon, and holds it in place.

Capsule (n.) A small saucer of clay for roasting or melting samples of ores, etc.; a scorifier.

Capsule (n.) A membranous sac containing fluid, or investing an organ or joint; as, the capsule of the lens of the eye. Also, a capsulelike organ.

Capsule (n.) A metallic seal or cover for closing a bottle.

Captain (n.) The military officer who commands a company, troop, or battery, or who has the rank entitling him to do so though he may be employed on other service.

Captain (n.) An officer in the United States navy, next above a commander and below a commodore, and ranking with a colonel in the army.

Captain (n.) By courtesy, an officer actually commanding a vessel, although not having the rank of captain.

Captain (n.) The master or commanding officer of a merchant vessel.

Captain (n.) One in charge of a portion of a ship's company; as, a captain of a top, captain of a gun, etc.

Captain (n.) A person having authority over others acting in concert; as, the captain of a boat's crew; the captain of a football team.

Captaincy (n.) The rank, post, or commission of a captain.

Captainry (n.) Power, or command, over a certain district; chieftainship.

Captainship (n.) The condition, rank, post, or authority of a captain or chief commander.

Captation (n.) A courting of favor or applause, by flattery or address; a captivating quality; an attraction.

Caption (n.) That part of a legal instrument, as a commission, indictment, etc., which shows where, when, and by what authority, it was taken, found, or executed.

Captive (a.) Made prisoner, especially in war; held in bondage or in confinement.

Captive (a.) Of or pertaining to bondage or confinement; serving to confine; as, captive chains; captive hours.

Captivity (n.) A state of being under control; subjection of the will or affections; bondage.

Capture (v. t.) To seize or take possession of by force, surprise, or stratagem; to overcome and hold; to secure by effort.

Capuchin (n.) A Franciscan monk of the austere branch established in 1526 by Matteo di Baschi, distinguished by wearing the long pointed cowl or capoch of St. Francis.

Capuchin (n.) A garment for women, consisting of a cloak and hood, resembling, or supposed to resemble, that of capuchin monks.

Capuchin (n.) A long-tailed South American monkey (Cabus capucinus), having the forehead naked and wrinkled, with the hair on the crown reflexed and resembling a monk's cowl, the rest being of a grayish white; -- called also capucine monkey, weeper, sajou, sapajou, and sai.

Caput (n.) The council or ruling body of the University of Cambridge prior to the constitution of 1856.

Car (n.) The basket, box, or cage suspended from a balloon to contain passengers, ballast, etc.

Caracole (n.) A half turn which a horseman makes, either to the right or the left.

Caracole (n.) A staircase in a spiral form.

Caracoled (imp. & p. p.) of Caracole

Caracole (v. i.) To move in a caracole, or in caracoles; to wheel.

Caracoly (n.) An alloy of gold, silver, and copper, of which an inferior quality of jewelry is made.

Caracore (n.) Alt. of Caracora

Caracora (n.) A light vessel or proa used by the people of Borneo, etc., and by the Dutch in the East Indies.

Caramel (n.) Burnt sugar; a brown or black porous substance obtained by heating sugar. It is soluble in water, and is used for coloring spirits, gravies, etc.

Caramel (n.) A kind of confectionery, usually a small cube or square of tenacious paste, or candy, of varying composition and flavor.

Caranx (n.) A genus of fishes, common on the Atlantic coast, including the yellow or golden mackerel.

Carapace (n.) The thick shell or shield which covers the back of the tortoise, or turtle, the crab, and other crustaceous animals.

Caravan (n.) A company of travelers, pilgrims, or merchants, organized and equipped for a long journey, or marching or traveling together, esp. through deserts and countries infested by robbers or hostile tribes, as in Asia or Africa.

Caravan (n.) A large, covered wagon, or a train of such wagons, for conveying wild beasts, etc., for exhibition; an itinerant show, as of wild beasts.

Caravan (n.) A covered vehicle for carrying passengers or for moving furniture, etc.; -- sometimes shorted into van.

Caravansary (n.) A kind of inn, in the East, where caravans rest at night, being a large, rude, unfurnished building, surrounding a court.

Caravel (n.) The caravel of the 16th century was a small vessel with broad bows, high, narrow poop, four masts, and lateen sails. Columbus commanded three caravels on his great voyage.

Caravel (n.) A small fishing boat used on the French coast.

Caraway (n.) A biennial plant of the Parsley family (Carum Carui). The seeds have an aromatic smell, and a warm, pungent taste. They are used in cookery and confectionery, and also in medicine as a carminative.

Caraway (n.) A cake or sweetmeat containing caraway seeds.

Carbamine (n.) An isocyanide of a hydrocarbon radical. The carbamines are liquids, usually colorless, and of unendurable odor.

Carbide (n.) A binary compound of carbon with some other element or radical, in which the carbon plays the part of a negative; -- formerly termed carburet.

Carbinol (n.) Methyl alcohol, CH3OH; -- also, by extension, any one in the homologous series of paraffine alcohols of which methyl alcohol is the type.

Carbohydrate (n.) One of a group of compounds including the sugars, starches, and gums, which contain six (or some multiple of six) carbon atoms, united with a variable number of hydrogen and oxygen atoms, but with the two latter always in proportion as to form water; as dextrose, C6H12O6.

Carbolic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid derived from coal tar and other sources; as, carbolic acid (called also phenic acid, and phenol). See Phenol.

Carbon (n.) An elementary substance, not metallic in its nature, which is present in all organic compounds. Atomic weight 11.97. Symbol C. it is combustible, and forms the base of lampblack and charcoal, and enters largely into mineral coals. In its pure crystallized state it constitutes the diamond, the hardest of known substances, occuring in monometric crystals like the octahedron, etc. Another modification is graphite, or blacklead, and in this it is soft, and occurs in hexagonal prisms or tables. When united with oxygen it forms carbon dioxide, commonly called carbonic acid, or carbonic oxide, according to the proportions of the oxygen; when united with hydrogen, it forms various compounds called hydrocarbons. Compare Diamond, and Graphite.

Carbonaceous (a.) Pertaining to, containing, or composed of, carbon.

Carbonado (n.) Flesh, fowl, etc., cut across, seasoned, and broiled on coals; a chop.

Carbonado (n.) A black variety of diamond, found in Brazil, and used for diamond drills. It occurs in irregular or rounded fragments, rarely distinctly crystallized, with a texture varying from compact to porous.

Carboniferous (a.) Producing or containing carbon or coal.

Carbonize (v. t.) To convert (an animal or vegetable substance) into a residue of carbon by the action of fire or some corrosive agent; to char.

Carbonize (v. t.) To impregnate or combine with carbon, as in making steel by cementation.

Carbonyl (n.) The radical (CO)'', occuring, always combined, in many compounds, as the aldehydes, the ketones, urea, carbonyl chloride, etc.

Carboxide (n.) A compound of carbon and oxygen, as carbonyl, with some element or radical; as, potassium carboxide.

Carboxyl (n.) The complex radical, CO.OH, regarded as the essential and characteristic constituent which all oxygen acids of carbon (as formic, acetic, benzoic acids, etc.) have in common; -- called also oxatyl.

Carboy (n.) A large, globular glass bottle, esp. one of green glass, inclosed in basket work or in a box, for protection; -- used commonly for carrying corrosive liquids; as sulphuric acid, etc.

Carbuncle (n.) A beautiful gem of a deep red color (with a mixture of scarlet) called by the Greeks anthrax; found in the East Indies. When held up to the sun, it loses its deep tinge, and becomes of the color of burning coal. The name belongs for the most part to ruby sapphire, though it has been also given to red spinel and garnet.

Carbuncle (n.) A very painful acute local inflammation of the subcutaneous tissue, esp. of the trunk or back of the neck, characterized by brawny hardness of the affected parts, sloughing of the skin and deeper tissues, and marked constitutional depression. It differs from a boil in size, tendency to spread, and the absence of a central core, and is frequently fatal. It is also called anthrax.

Carbuncle (n.) A charge or bearing supposed to represent the precious stone. It has eight scepters or staves radiating from a common center. Called also escarbuncle.

Carbunculation (n.) The blasting of the young buds of trees or plants, by excessive heat or cold.

Carburet (v. t.) To combine or to impregnate with carbon, as by passing through or over a liquid hydrocarbon; to carbonize or carburize.

Carbureted (a.) Saturated or impregnated with some volatile carbon compound; as, water gas is carbureted to increase its illuminating power.

Carburetor (n.) An apparatus in which coal gas, hydrogen, or air is passed through or over a volatile hydrocarbon, in order to confer or increase illuminating power.

Carburize (v. t.) To combine with carbon or a carbon compound; -- said esp. of a process for conferring a higher degree of illuminating power on combustible gases by mingling them with a vapor of volatile hydrocarbons.

Carcanet (n.) A jeweled chain, necklace, or collar.

Carcass (n.) A dead body, whether of man or beast; a corpse; now commonly the dead body of a beast.

Carcass (n.) The living body; -- now commonly used in contempt or ridicule.

Carcass (n.) The abandoned and decaying remains of some bulky and once comely thing, as a ship; the skeleton, or the uncovered or unfinished frame, of a thing.

Carcass (n.) A hollow case or shell, filled with combustibles, to be thrown from a mortar or howitzer, to set fire to buldings, ships, etc.

Carcinology (n.) The department of zoology which treats of the Crustacea (lobsters, crabs, etc.); -- called also malacostracology and crustaceology.

Card (n.) A published note, containing a brief statement, explanation, request, expression of thanks, or the like; as, to put a card in the newspapers. Also, a printed programme, and (fig.), an attraction or inducement; as, this will be a good card for the last day of the fair.

Card (n.) A paper on which the points of the compass are marked; the dial or face of the mariner's compass.

Card (n.) An instrument for disentangling and arranging the fibers of cotton, wool, flax, etc.; or for cleaning and smoothing the hair of animals; -- usually consisting of bent wire teeth set closely in rows in a thick piece of leather fastened to a back.

Card (v. t.) To comb with a card; to cleanse or disentangle by carding; as, to card wool; to card a horse.

Cardamine (n.) A genus of cruciferous plants, containing the lady's-smock, cuckooflower, bitter cress, meadow cress, etc.

Cardamom (n.) The aromatic fruit, or capsule with its seeds, of several plants of the Ginger family growing in the East Indies and elsewhere, and much used as a condiment, and in medicine.

Cardboard (n.) A stiff compact pasteboard of various qualities, for making cards, etc., often having a polished surface.

Cardiac (a.) Exciting action in the heart, through the medium of the stomach; cordial; stimulant.

Cardialgy (n.) A burning or gnawing pain, or feeling of distress, referred to the region of the heart, accompanied with cardiac palpitation; heartburn. It is usually a symptom of indigestion.

Cardinal (a.) One of the ecclesiastical princes who constitute the pope's council, or the sacred college.

Cardinalship (n.) The condition, dignity, of office of a cardinal

Carding (v. t.) A roll of wool or other fiber as it comes from the carding machine.

Cardiograph (n.) An instrument which, when placed in contact with the chest, will register graphically the comparative duration and intensity of the heart's movements.

Cardiosphygmograph (n.) A combination of cardiograph and sphygmograph.

Cardoon (n.) A large herbaceous plant (Cynara Cardunculus) related to the artichoke; -- used in cookery and as a salad.

Care (n.) A burdensome sense of responsibility; trouble caused by onerous duties; anxiety; concern; solicitude.

Care (n.) To be anxious or solicitous; to be concerned; to have regard or interest; -- sometimes followed by an objective of measure.

Career (n.) A race course: the ground run over.

Career (n.) A running; full speed; a rapid course.

Career (n.) General course of action or conduct in life, or in a particular part or calling in life, or in some special undertaking; usually applied to course or conduct which is of a public character; as, Washington's career as a soldier.

Careful (a.) Filling with care or solicitude; exposing to concern, anxiety, or trouble; painful.

Careless (a.) Having no care; not taking ordinary or proper care; negligent; unconcerned; heedless; inattentive; unmindful; regardless.

Careless (a.) Without thought or purpose; without due care; without attention to rule or system; unstudied; inconsiderate; spontaneous; rash; as, a careless throw; a careless expression.

Cargo (n.) The lading or freight of a ship or other vessel; the goods, merchandise, or whatever is conveyed in a vessel or boat; load; freight.

Carib (n.) A native of the Caribbee islands or the coasts of the Caribbean sea; esp., one of a tribe of Indians inhabiting a region of South America, north of the Amazon, and formerly most of the West India islands.

Caribou (n.) The American reindeer, especially the common or woodland species (Rangifer Caribou).

Caricous (a.) Of the shape of a fig; as, a caricous tumor.

Carina (n.) That part of a papilionaceous flower, consisting of two petals, commonly united, which incloses the organs of fructification

Carinaria (n.) A genus of oceanic heteropod Mollusca, having a thin, glassy, bonnet-shaped shell, which covers only the nucleus and gills.

Cariole (n.) A covered cart

Cark (n.) A noxious or corroding care; solicitude; worry.

Carking (a.) Distressing; worrying; perplexing; corroding; as, carking cares.

Caroline (n.) A silver coin once current in some parts of Italy, worth about seven cents.

Carlot (n.) A churl; a boor; a peasant or countryman.

Carman (n.) A man whose employment is to drive, or to convey goods in, a car or car.

Carminative (n.) A substance, esp. an aromatic, which tends to expel wind from the alimentary canal, or to relieve colic, griping, or flatulence.

Carmine (n.) A rich red or crimson color with a shade of purple.

Carmine (n.) A beautiful pigment, or a lake, of this color, prepared from cochineal, and used in miniature painting.

Carmine (n.) The essential coloring principle of cochineal, extracted as a purple-red amorphous mass. It is a glucoside and possesses acid properties; -- hence called also carminic acid.

Carmot (n.) The matter of which the philosopher's stone was believed to be composed.

Carnally (adv.) According to the flesh, to the world, or to human nature; in a manner to gratify animal appetites and lusts; sensually.

Carnary (n.) A vault or crypt in connection with a church, used as a repository for human bones disintered from their original burial places; a charnel house.

Carnation (n.) The natural color of flesh; rosy pink.

Carnation (n.) Those parts of a picture in which the human body or any part of it is represented in full color; the flesh tints.

Carnation (n.) A species of Dianthus (D. Caryophyllus) or pink, having very beautiful flowers of various colors, esp. white and usually a rich, spicy scent.

Carnationed (a.) Having a flesh color.

Carnelian (n.) A variety of chalcedony, of a clear, deep red, flesh red, or reddish white color. It is moderately hard, capable of a good polish, and often used for seals.

Carnify (v. i.) To form flesh; to become like flesh.

Carnival (n.) A festival celebrated with merriment and revelry in Roman Gatholic countries during the week before Lent, esp. at Rome and Naples, during a few days (three to ten) before Lent, ending with Shrove Tuesday.

Carnival (n.) Any merrymaking, feasting, or masquerading, especially when overstepping the bounds of decorum; a time of riotous excess.

Carnous (a.) Of a fleshy consistence; -- applied to succulent leaves, stems, etc.

Carnosity (n.) Fleshy substance or quality; fleshy covering.

Carob (n.) An evergreen leguminous tree (Ceratania Siliqua) found in the countries bordering the Mediterranean; the St. John's bread; -- called also carob tree.

Caroche (n.) A kind of pleasure carriage; a coach.

Carolin (n.) A former gold coin of Germany worth nearly five dollars; also, a gold coin of Sweden worth nearly five dollars.

Caroline (n.) A coin. See Carline.

Carolus (n.) An English gold coin of the value of twenty or twenty-three shillings. It was first struck in the reign of Charles I.

Carom (n.) A shot in which the ball struck with the cue comes in contact with two or more balls on the table; a hitting of two or more balls with the player's ball. In England it is called cannon.

Carotid (n.) One of the two main arteries of the neck, by which blood is conveyed from the aorta to the head. [See Illust. of Aorta.]

Carouse (v. i.) To drink deeply or freely in compliment; to take part in a carousal; to engage in drunken revels.

Carpellum (n.) A simple pistil or single-celled ovary or seed vessel, or one of the parts of a compound pistil, ovary, or seed vessel. See Illust of Carpaphore.

Carpellary (a.) Belonging to, forming, or containing carpels.

Carpentry (n.) The art of cutting, framing, and joining timber, as in the construction of buildings.

Carpentry (n.) An assemblage of pieces of timber connected by being framed together, as the pieces of a roof, floor, etc.; work done by a carpenter.

Carpet (n.) A heavy woven or felted fabric, usually of wool, but also of cotton, hemp, straw, etc.; esp. a floor covering made in breadths to be sewed together and nailed to the floor, as distinguished from a rug or mat; originally, also, a wrought cover for tables.

Carpet (n.) A smooth soft covering resembling or suggesting a carpet.

Carpet (v. t.) To cover with, or as with, a carpet; to spread with carpets; to furnish with a carpet or carpets.

Carpetbagger (n.) An adventurer; -- a term of contempt for a Northern man seeking private gain or political advancement in the southern part of the United States after the Civil War (1865).

Carpeting (n.) The act of covering with carpets.

Carpintero (n.) A california woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus), noted for its habit of inserting acorns in holes which it drills in trees. The acorns become infested by insect larvae, which, when grown, are extracted for food by the bird.

Carpophagous (a.) Living on fruits; fruit-consuming.

Carpophyll (n.) A leaf converted into a fruit or a constituent portion of a fruit; a carpel. [See Illust. of Gymnospermous.]

Carpophyte (n.) A flowerless plant which forms a true fruit as the result of fertilization, as the red seaweeds, the Ascomycetes, etc.

Carpospore (n.) A kind of spore formed in the conceptacles of red algae.

Carpus (n.) The wrist; the bones or cartilages between the forearm, or antibrachium, and the hand or forefoot; in man, consisting of eight short bones disposed in two rows.

Carrigeen (n.) A small, purplish, branching, cartilaginous seaweed (Chondrus crispus), which, when bleached, is the Irish moss of commerce.

Carriage (n.) The act of carrying, transporting, or conveying.

Carriage (n.) That which carries of conveys,

Carriage (n.) A wheeled vehicle for persons, esp. one designed for elegance and comfort.

Carriage (n.) The act or manner of conducting measures or projects; management.

Carriageable (a.) Passable by carriages; that can be conveyed in carriages.

Carrier (n.) One who, or that which, carries or conveys; a messenger.

Carrier (n.) That which drives or carries; as: (a) A piece which communicates to an object in a lathe the motion of the face plate; a lathe dog. (b) A spool holder or bobbin holder in a braiding machine. (c) A movable piece in magazine guns which transfers the cartridge to a position from which it can be thrust into the barrel.

Carrion (n.) The dead and putrefying body or flesh of an animal; flesh so corrupted as to be unfit for food.

Carrion (n.) A contemptible or worthless person; -- a term of reproach.

Carron oil () A lotion of linseed oil and lime water, used as an application to burns and scalds; -- first used at the Carron iron works in Scotland.

Carrot (n.) The esculent root of cultivated varieties of the plant, usually spindle-shaped, and of a reddish yellow color.

Carroty (a.) Like a carrot in color or in taste; -- an epithet given to reddish yellow hair, etc.

Carry (v. t.) To convey or transport in any manner from one place to another; to bear; -- often with away or off.

Carry (v. t.) To move; to convey by force; to impel; to conduct; to lead or guide.

Carry (v. t.) To transfer from one place (as a country, book, or column) to another; as, to carry the war from Greece into Asia; to carry an account to the ledger; to carry a number in adding figures.

Carry (v. t.) To convey by extension or continuance; to extend; as, to carry the chimney through the roof; to carry a road ten miles farther.

Carry (v. t.) To bear or uphold successfully through conflict, as a leader or principle; hence, to succeed in, as in a contest; to bring to a successful issue; to win; as, to carry an election.

Carry (v. t.) To contain; to comprise; to bear the aspect of ; to show or exhibit; to imply.

Carry (v. t.) To bear (one's self); to behave, to conduct or demean; -- with the reflexive pronouns.

Carry (v. i.) To act as a bearer; to convey anything; as, to fetch and carry.

Carryall (n.) A light covered carriage, having four wheels and seats for four or more persons, usually drawn by one horse.

Cart (n.) A common name for various kinds of vehicles, as a Scythian dwelling on wheels, or a chariot.

Cart (v. t.) To carry or convey in a cart.

Carte blanche () A blank paper, with a person's signature, etc., at the bottom, given to another person, with permission to superscribe what conditions he pleases. Hence: Unconditional terms; unlimited authority.

Cartel (n.) A letter of defiance or challenge; a challenge to single combat.

Carthamin (n.) A red coloring matter obtained from the safflower, or Carthamus tinctorius.

Cartilaginous (a.) Having the skeleton in the state of cartilage, the bones containing little or no calcareous matter; said of certain fishes, as the sturgeon and the sharks.

Cartoon (n.) A design or study drawn of the full size, to serve as a model for transferring or copying; -- used in the making of mosaics, tapestries, fresco pantings and the like; as, the cartoons of Raphael.

Cartouch (n.) A cantalever, console, corbel, or modillion, which has the form of a scroll of paper

Cartouch (n.) An oval figure on monuments, and in papyri, containing the name of a sovereign.

Cartridge (n.) A complete charge for a firearm, contained in, or held together by, a case, capsule, or shell of metal, pasteboard, or other material.

Cartulary (n.) A register, or record, as of a monastery or church.

Cartulary (n.) An ecclesiastical officer who had charge of records or other public papers.

Carus (n.) Coma with complete insensibility; deep lethargy.

Carve (v. t.) To cut, as wood, stone, or other material, in an artistic or decorative manner; to sculpture; to engrave.

Carve (v. t.) To lay out; to contrive; to design; to plan.

Carver (n.) One who carves; one who shapes or fashions by carving, or as by carving; esp. one who carves decorative forms, architectural adornments, etc.

Carving (n.) A piece of decorative work cut in stone, wood, or other material.

Carving (n.) The whole body of decorative sculpture of any kind or epoch, or in any material; as, the Italian carving of the 15th century.

Caryatid (n.) A draped female figure supporting an entablature, in the place of a column or pilaster.

Caryophyllaceous (a.) Having corollas of five petals with long claws inclosed in a tubular, calyx, as the pink

Caryophyllin (n.) A tasteless and odorless crystalline substance, extracted from cloves, polymeric with common camphor.

Caryopsis (n.) A one-celled, dry, indehiscent fruit, with a thin membranous pericarp, adhering closely to the seed, so that fruit and seed are incorporated in one body, forming a single grain, as of wheat, barley, etc.

Cascabel (n.) The projection in rear of the breech of a cannon, usually a knob or breeching loop connected with the gun by a neck. In old writers it included all in rear of the base ring. [See Illust. of Cannon.]

Case (n.) A box, sheath, or covering; as, a case for holding goods; a case for spectacles; the case of a watch; the case (capsule) of a cartridge; a case (cover) for a book.

Case (n.) A box and its contents; the quantity contained in a box; as, a case of goods; a case of instruments.

Case (n.) A shallow tray divided into compartments or "boxes" for holding type.

Case (v. t.) To cover or protect with, or as with, a case; to inclose.

Case (n.) That which befalls, comes, or happens; an event; an instance; a circumstance, or all the circumstances; condition; state of things; affair; as, a strange case; a case of injustice; the case of the Indian tribes.

Case (n.) The matters of fact or conditions involved in a suit, as distinguished from the questions of law; a suit or action at law; a cause.

Case (n.) One of the forms, or the inflections or changes of form, of a noun, pronoun, or adjective, which indicate its relation to other words, and in the aggregate constitute its declension; the relation which a noun or pronoun sustains to some other word.

Caseharden (v. t.) To subject to a process which converts the surface of iron into steel.

Casehardening (n.) The act or process of converting the surface of iron into steel.

Casein (n.) A proteid substance present in both the animal and the vegetable kingdom. In the animal kingdom it is chiefly found in milk, and constitutes the main part of the curd separated by rennet; in the vegetable kingdom it is found more or less abundantly in the seeds of leguminous plants. Its reactions resemble those of alkali albumin.

Casemate (n.) A hollow molding, chiefly in cornices.

Case shot () A collection of small projectiles, inclosed in a case or canister.

Cash (n.) Ready money; especially, coin or specie; but also applied to bank notes, drafts, bonds, or any paper easily convertible into money

Cash (n.sing & pl.) A Chinese coin.

Cashew (n.) A tree (Anacardium occidentale) of the same family which the sumac. It is native in tropical America, but is now naturalized in all tropical countries. Its fruit, a kidney-shaped nut, grows at the extremity of an edible, pear-shaped hypocarp, about three inches long.

Cashier (n.) One who has charge of money; a cash keeper; the officer who has charge of the payments and receipts (moneys, checks, notes), of a bank or a mercantile company.

Cashmere (n.) A dress fabric made of fine wool, or of fine wool and cotton, in imitation of the original cashmere.

Casing (n.) The act or process of inclosing in, or covering with, a case or thin substance, as plaster, boards, etc.

Casing (n.) An outside covering, for protection or ornament, or to precent the radiation of heat.

Casino (n.) A small country house.

Cask (n.) The quantity contained in a cask.

Casket (n.) Anything containing or intended to contain something highly esteemed

Cassareep (n.) A condiment made from the sap of the bitter cassava (Manihot utilissima) deprived of its poisonous qualities, concentrated by boiling, and flavored with aromatics. See Pepper pot.

Cassia (n.) The bark of several species of Cinnamomum grown in China, etc.; Chinese cinnamon. It is imported as cassia, but commonly sold as cinnamon, from which it differs more or less in strength and flavor, and the amount of outer bark attached.

Cassican (n.) An American bird of the genus Cassicus, allied to the starlings and orioles, remarkable for its skillfully constructed and suspended nest; the crested oriole. The name is also sometimes given to the piping crow, an Australian bird.

Cassideous (a.) Helmet-shaped; -- applied to a corolla having a broad, helmet-shaped upper petal, as in aconite.

Cassidony (n.) The goldilocks (Chrysocoma Linosyris) and perhaps other plants related to the genus Gnaphalium or cudweed.

Cassinette (n.) A cloth with a cotton warp, and a woof of very fine wool, or wool and silk.

Cassiopeia (n.) A constellation of the northern hemisphere, situated between Cepheus and Perseus; -- so called in honor of the wife of Cepheus, a fabulous king of Ethiopia.

Cassiterite (n.) Native tin dioxide; tin stone; a mineral occurring in tetragonal crystals of reddish brown color, and brilliant adamantine luster; also massive, sometimes in compact forms with concentric fibrous structure resembling wood (wood tin), also in rolled fragments or pebbly (Stream tin). It is the chief source of metallic tin. See Black tin, under Black.

Cassius (n.) A brownish purple pigment, obtained by the action of some compounds of tin upon certain salts of gold. It is used in painting and staining porcelain and glass to give a beautiful purple color. Commonly called Purple of Cassius.

Cassock (n.) A garment resembling a long frock coat worn by the clergy of certain churches when officiating, and by others as the usually outer garment.

Cassolette (n.) a box, or vase, with a perforated cover to emit perfumes.

Cassowary (n.) A large bird, of the genus Casuarius, found in the east Indies. It is smaller and stouter than the ostrich. Its head is armed with a kind of helmet of horny substance, consisting of plates overlapping each other, and it has a group of long sharp spines on each wing which are used as defensive organs. It is a shy bird, and runs with great rapidity. Other species inhabit New Guinea, Australia, etc.

Cast (v. t.) To compute; to reckon; to calculate; as, to cast a horoscope.

Cast (v. t.) To contrive; to plan.

Cast (v. t.) To defeat in a lawsuit; to decide against; to convict; as, to be cast in damages.

Cast (v. i.) To consider; to turn or revolve in the mind; to plan; as, to cast about for reasons.

Cast (v. i.) To calculate; to compute.

Cast (v. i.) To warp; to become twisted out of shape.

Cast (n.) That which is formed in a mild; esp. a reproduction or copy, as of a work of art, in bronze or plaster, etc.; a casting.

Cast (n.) Form; appearence; mien; air; style; as, a peculiar cast of countenance.

Cast (n.) A tendency to any color; a tinge; a shade.

Cast (n.) A flight or a couple or set of hawks let go at one time from the hand.

Cast (n.) A tube or funnel for conveying metal into a mold.

Cast (n.) Four; that is, as many as are thrown into a vessel at once in counting herrings, etc; a warp.

Castanets (n. pl.) Two small, concave shells of ivory or hard wood, shaped like spoons, fastened to the thumb, and beaten together with the middle finger; -- used by the Spaniards and Moors as an accompaniment to their dance and guitars.

Caste (n.) One of the hereditary classes into which the Hindoos are divided according to the laws of Brahmanism.

Caste (n.) A separate and fixed order or class of persons in society who chiefly hold intercourse among themselves.

Caster (n.) One who casts; as, caster of stones, etc. ; a caster of cannon; a caster of accounts.

Caster (n.) A vial, cruet, or other small vessel, used to contain condiments at the table; as, a set of casters.

Castigate (v. t.) To emend; to correct.

Castigation (n.) Emendation; correction.

Castigator (n.) One who castigates or corrects.

Castigatory (a.) Punitive in order to amendment; corrective.

Castigatory (n.) An instrument formerly used to punish and correct arrant scolds; -- called also a ducking stool, or trebucket.

Cast iron () Highly carbonized iron, the direct product of the blast furnace; -- used for making castings, and for conversion into wrought iron and steel. It can not be welded or forged, is brittle, and sometimes very hard. Besides carbon, it contains sulphur, phosphorus, silica, etc.

Castle (v. i.) To move the castle to the square next to king, and then the king around the castle to the square next beyond it, for the purpose of covering the king.

Castling (n.) A compound move of the king and castle. See Castle, v. i.

Castor (n.) A heavy quality of broadcloth for overcoats.

Castor (n.) the northernmost of the two bright stars in the constellation Gemini, the other being Pollux.

Castor bean () The bean or seed of the castor-oil plant (Ricinus communis, or Palma Christi.)

Castor oil () A mild cathartic oil, expressed or extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis, or Palma Christi. When fresh the oil is inodorous and insipid.

Casual (a.) Happening or coming to pass without design, and without being foreseen or expected; accidental; fortuitous; coming by chance.

Casualism (n.) The doctrine that all things exist or are controlled by chance.

Casualty (n.) That which comes without design or without being foreseen; contingency.

Casuarina (n.) A genus of leafless trees or shrubs, with drooping branchlets of a rushlike appearance, mostly natives of Australia. Some of them are large, producing hard and heavy timber of excellent quality, called beefwood from its color.

Casuistry (a.) The science or doctrine of dealing with cases of conscience, of resolving questions of right or wrong in conduct, or determining the lawfulness or unlawfulness of what a man may do by rules and principles drawn from the Scriptures, from the laws of society or the church, or from equity and natural reason; the application of general moral rules to particular cases.

Casus (n.) An event; an occurrence; an occasion; a combination of circumstances; a case; an act of God. See the Note under Accident.

Cat (n.) An animal of various species of the genera Felis and Lynx. The domestic cat is Felis domestica. The European wild cat (Felis catus) is much larger than the domestic cat. In the United States the name wild cat is commonly applied to the bay lynx (Lynx rufus) See Wild cat, and Tiger cat.

Cat (n.) A strong vessel with a narrow stern, projecting quarters, and deep waist. It is employed in the coal and timber trade.

Cat (n.) An old game; (a) The game of tipcat and the implement with which it is played. See Tipcat. (c) A game of ball, called, according to the number of batters, one old cat, two old cat, etc.

Cata () The Latin and English form of a Greek preposition, used as a prefix to signify down, downward, under, against, contrary or opposed to, wholly, completely; as in cataclysm, catarrh. It sometimes drops the final vowel, as in catoptric; and is sometimes changed to cath, as in cathartic, catholic.

Catacomb (n.) A cave, grotto, or subterraneous place of large extent used for the burial of the dead; -- commonly in the plural.

Catacoustic (n.) That part of acoustics which treats of reflected sounds or echoes See Acoustics.

Catadrome (n.) A race course.

Catafalco (n.) See Catafalque.

Catafalque (n.) A temporary structure sometimes used in the funeral solemnities of eminent persons, for the public exhibition of the remains, or their conveyance to the place of burial.

Catagmatic (a.) Having the quality of consolidating broken bones.

Catalectic (a.) Incomplete; partial; not affecting the whole of a substance.

Catalepsis (n.) A sudden suspension of sensation and volition, the body and limbs preserving the position that may be given them, while the action of the heart and lungs continues.

Catallacta (n. pl.) A division of Protozoa, of which Magosphaera is the type. They exist both in a myxopod state, with branched pseudopodia, and in the form of ciliated bodies united in free, spherical colonies.

Catallactics (n.) The science of exchanges, a branch of political economy.

Catalogue (n.) A list or enumeration of names, or articles arranged methodically, often in alphabetical order; as, a catalogue of the students of a college, or of books, or of the stars.

Catalysis (n.) A process by which reaction occurs in the presence of certain agents which were formerly believed to exert an influence by mere contact. It is now believed that such reactions are attended with the formation of an intermediate compound or compounds, so that by alternate composition and decomposition the agent is apparenty left unchanged; as, the catalysis of making ether from alcohol by means of sulphuric acid; or catalysis in the action of soluble ferments (as diastase, or ptyalin) on starch.

Catamaran (n.) A kind of raft or float, consisting of two or more logs or pieces of wood lashed together, and moved by paddles or sail; -- used as a surf boat and for other purposes on the coasts of the East and West Indies and South America. Modified forms are much used in the lumber regions of North America, and at life-saving stations.

Catamaran (n.) A quarrelsome woman; a scold.

Catamenia (n. pl.) The monthly courses of women; menstrual discharges; menses.

Catamount (n.) The cougar. Applied also, in some parts of the United States, to the lynx.

Catapasm (n.) A compound medicinal powder, used by the ancients to sprinkle on ulcers, to absorb perspiration, etc.

Cataphonic (a.) Of or relating to cataphonics; catacoustic.

Cataphonics (n.) That branch of acoustics which treats of reflected sounds; catacoustics.

Cataphract (n.) A horseman covered with a cataphract.

Cataphract (n.) The armor or plate covering some fishes.

Cataphracted (a.) Covered with a cataphract, or armor of plates, scales, etc.; or with that which corresponds to this, as horny or bony plates, hard, callous skin, etc.

Cataphysical (a.) Unnatural; contrary to nature.

Catarrh (n.) An inflammatory affection of any mucous membrane, in which there are congestion, swelling, and an altertion in the quantity and quality of mucus secreted; as, catarrh of the stomach; catarrh of the bladder.

Catastasis (n.) The state, or condition of anything; constitution; habit of body.

Catastrophe (n.) The final event in a romance or a dramatic piece; a denouement, as a death in a tragedy, or a marriage in a comedy.

Catawba (n.) A light-colored, sprightly American wine from the Catawba grape.

Catbird (n.) An American bird (Galeoscoptes Carolinensis), allied to the mocking bird, and like it capable of imitating the notes of other birds, but less perfectly. Its note resembles at times the mewing of a cat.

Catch (v. t.) To communicate to; to fasten upon; as, the fire caught the adjoining building.

Catch (v. t.) To take or receive; esp. to take by sympathy, contagion, infection, or exposure; as, to catch the spirit of an occasion; to catch the measles or smallpox; to catch cold; the house caught fire.

Catch (v. t.) To come upon unexpectedly or by surprise; to find; as, to catch one in the act of stealing.

Catch (v. t.) To reach in time; to come up with; as, to catch a train.

Catch (v. i.) To spread by, or as by, infecting; to communicate.

Catch (n.) A humorous canon or round, so contrived that the singers catch up each other's words.

Catchfly (n.) A plant with the joints of the stem, and sometimes other parts, covered with a viscid secretion to which small insects adhere. The species of Silene are examples of the catchfly.

Catching (a.) Infectious; contagious.

Catchment (n.) A surface of ground on which water may be caught and collected into a reservoir.

Catchpenny (a.) Made or contrived for getting small sums of money from the ignorant or unwary; as, a catchpenny book; a catchpenny show.

Catchword (n.) The first word of any page of a book after the first, inserted at the right hand bottom corner of the preceding page for the assistance of the reader. It is seldom used in modern printing.

Catchwork (n.) A work or artificial water-course for throwing water on lands that lie on the slopes of hills; a catchdrain.

Catechetical (a.) Relating to or consisting in, asking questions and receiving answers, according to the ancient manner of teaching.

Catechise (v. t.) To instruct by asking questions, receiving answers, and offering explanations and corrections, -- esp. in regard to points of religious faith.

Catechise (v. t.) To question or interrogate; to examine or try by questions; -- sometimes with a view to reproof, by eliciting from a person answers which condemn his own conduct.

Catechism (n.) A book containing a summary of principles, especially of religious doctrine, reduced to the form of questions and answers.

Catechu (n.) A dry, brown, astringent extract, obtained by decoction and evaporation from the Acacia catechu, and several other plants growing in India. It contains a large portion of tannin or tannic acid, and is used in medicine and in the arts. It is also known by the names terra japonica, cutch, gambier, etc.

Catechumen (L. catechunenus, Gr. / instructed, from /. See) One who is receiving rudimentary instruction in the doctrines of Christianity; a neophyte; in the primitive church, one officially recognized as a Christian, and admitted to instruction preliminary to admission to full membership in the church.

Catechumenate (n.) The state or condition of a catechumen or the time during which one is a catechumen.

Categorical (a.) Not hypothetical or relative; admitting no conditions or exceptions; declarative; absolute; positive; express; as, a categorical proposition, or answer.

Category (n.) One of the highest classes to which the objects of knowledge or thought can be reduced, and by which they can be arranged in a system; an ultimate or undecomposable conception; a predicament.

Category (n.) Class; also, state, condition, or predicament; as, we are both in the same category.

Catel (n.) Property; -- often used by Chaucer in contrast with rent, or income.

Catelectrotonus (n.) The condition of increased irritability of a nerve in the region of the cathode or negative electrode, on the passage of a current of electricity through it.

Catena (n.) A chain or series of things connected with each other.

Catenate (v. t.) To connect, in a series of links or ties; to chain.

Catenation (n.) Connection of links or union of parts, as in a chain; a regular or connected series. See Concatenation.

Catenulate (a.) Chainlike; -- said both or color marks and of indentations when arranged like the links of a chain, as on shells, etc.

Cater-cornered (a.) Diagonal.

Cater-cousin (n.) A remote relation. See Quater-cousin.

Caterpillar (n.) The larval state of a butterfly or any lepidopterous insect; sometimes, but less commonly, the larval state of other insects, as the sawflies, which are also called false caterpillars. The true caterpillars have three pairs of true legs, and several pairs of abdominal fleshy legs (prolegs) armed with hooks. Some are hairy, others naked. They usually feed on leaves, fruit, and succulent vegetables, being often very destructive, Many of them are popularly called worms, as the cutworm, cankerworm, army worm, cotton worm, silkworm.

Caterpillar (n.) A plant of the genus Scorpiurus, with pods resembling caterpillars.

Catgut (n.) A cord of great toughness made from the intestines of animals, esp. of sheep, used for strings of musical instruments, etc.

Cathartin (n.) The bitter, purgative principle of senna. It is a glucoside with the properties of a weak acid; -- called also cathartic acid, and cathartina.

Cathay (n.) China; -- an old name for the Celestial Empire, said have been introduced by Marco Polo and to be a corruption of the Tartar name for North China (Khitai, the country of the Khitans.)

Catheter (n.) The name of various instruments for passing along mucous canals, esp. applied to a tubular instrument to be introduced into the bladder through the urethra to draw off the urine.

Cathetometer (n.) An instrument for the accurate measurement of small differences of height; esp. of the differences in the height of the upper surfaces of two columns of mercury or other fluid, or of the same column at different times. It consists of a telescopic leveling apparatus (d), which slides up or down a perpendicular metallic standard very finely graduated (bb). The telescope is raised or depressed in order to sight the objects or surfaces, and the differences in vertical height are thus shown on the graduated standard.

Cathodic (a.) A term applied to the centrifugal, or efferent, course of the nervous influence.

Catholic (n.) A person who accepts the creeds which are received in common by all parts of the orthodox Christian church.

Catholicity (n.) Adherence or conformity to the system of doctrine held by all parts of the orthodox Christian church; the doctrine so held; orthodoxy.

Catholicize (v. t. & i.) To make or to become catholic or Roman Catholic.

Catholicon (n.) A remedy for all diseases; a panacea.

Catholicos (n.) The spiritual head of the Armenian church, who resides at Etchmiadzin, Russia, and has ecclesiastical jurisdiction over, and consecrates the holy oil for, the Armenians of Russia, Turkey, and Persia, including the Patriarchs of Constantinople, Jerusalem, and Sis.

Catilinarian (a.) Pertaining to Catiline, the Roman conspirator; resembling Catiline's conspiracy.

Cation (n.) An electro-positive substance, which in electro-decomposition is evolved at the cathode; -- opposed to anion.

Catkin (n.) An ament; a species of inflorescence, consisting of a slender axis with many unisexual apetalous flowers along its sides, as in the willow and poplar, and (as to the staminate flowers) in the chestnut, oak, hickory, etc. -- so called from its resemblance to a cat's tail. See Illust. of Ament.

Catoptromancy (n.) A species of divination, which was performed by letting down a mirror into water, for a sick person to look at his face in it. If his countenance appeared distorted and ghastly, it was an ill omen; if fresh and healthy, it was favorable.

Cat's-paw (n.) A dupe; a tool; one who, or that which, is used by another as an instrument to a accomplish his purposes.

Catstitch (v. t.) To fold and sew down the edge of with a coarse zigzag stitch.

Caucus (n.) A meeting, especially a preliminary meeting, of persons belonging to a party, to nominate candidates for public office, or to select delegates to a nominating convention, or to confer regarding measures of party policy; a political primary meeting.

Caul (n.) A covering of network for the head, worn by women; also, a net.

Caul (n.) The fold of membrane loaded with fat, which covers more or less of the intestines in mammals; the great omentum. See Omentum.

Causal (a.) Relating to a cause or causes; inplying or containing a cause or causes; expressing a cause; causative.

Causally (adv.) According to the order or series of causes; by tracing effects to causes.

Cause (v.) A suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action.

Cause (conj.) Abbreviation of Because.

Caustical (a.) Capable of destroying the texture of anything or eating away its substance by chemical action; burning; corrosive; searing.

Caustic (a.) Any substance or means which, applied to animal or other organic tissue, burns, corrodes, or destroys it by chemical action; an escharotic.

Causticily (n.) The quality of being caustic; corrosiveness; as, the causticity of potash.

Cauterize (v. t.) To sear, as the conscience.

Cautery (n.) A burning or searing, as of morbid flesh, with a hot iron, or by application of a caustic that will burn, corrode, or destroy animal tissue.

Cautious (a.) Attentive to examine probable effects and consequences of acts with a view to avoid danger or misfortune; prudent; circumspect; wary; watchful; as, a cautious general.

Cavalier (n.) One of the court party in the time of king Charles I. as contrasted with a Roundhead or an adherent of Parliament.

Cavally (n.) A carangoid fish of the Atlantic coast (Caranx hippos): -- called also horse crevalle. [See Illust. under Carangoid.]

Cavatina (n.) Originally, a melody of simpler form than the aria; a song without a second part and a da capo; -- a term now variously and vaguely used.

Cave (n.) To make hollow; to scoop out.

Caveat (n.) A notice given by an interested party to some officer not to do a certain act until the party is heard in opposition; as, a caveat entered in a probate court to stop the proving of a will or the taking out of letters of administration, etc.

Cavendish (n.) Leaf tobacco softened, sweetened, and pressed into plugs or cakes.

Cavetto (n.) A concave molding; -- used chiefly in classical architecture. See Illust. of Column.

Cavicorn (a.) Having hollow horns.

Cavicornia (n. pl.) A group of ruminants whose horns are hollow, and planted on a bony process of the front, as the ox.

Cavin (n.) A hollow way, adapted to cover troops, and facilitate their aproach to a place.

Cavy (n.) A rodent of the genera Cavia and Dolichotis, as the guinea pig (Cavia cobaya). Cavies are natives of South America.

Cawk (n.) An opaque, compact variety of barite, or heavy spar.

Cayugas (n. pl.) A tribe of Indians formerly inhabiting western New-York, forming part of the confederacy called the Five Nations.

Cease (v. i.) To come to an end; to stop; to leave off or give over; to desist; as, the noise ceased.

Cede (v. t.) To yield or surrender; to give up; to resign; as, to cede a fortress, a province, or country, to another nation, by treaty.

Ceil (v. t.) To overlay or cover the inner side of the roof of; to furnish with a ceiling; as, to ceil a room.

Ceil (v. t.) To line or finish a surface, as of a wall, with plaster, stucco, thin boards, or the like.

Celadon (n.) A pale sea-green color; also, porcelain or fine pottery of this tint.

Celandine (n.) A perennial herbaceous plant (Chelidonium majus) of the poppy family, with yellow flowers. It is used as a medicine in jaundice, etc., and its acrid saffron-colored juice is used to cure warts and the itch; -- called also greater celandine and swallowwort.

Celebrity (n.) The state or condition of being celebrated; fame; renown; as, the celebrity of Washington.

Celestite (n.) Native strontium sulphate, a mineral so named from its occasional delicate blue color. It occurs crystallized, also in compact massive and fibrous forms.

Cell (n.) A very small and close apartment, as in a prison or in a monastery or convent; the hut of a hermit.

Cell (n.) A small religious house attached to a monastery or convent.

Cell (n.) A jar of vessel, or a division of a compound vessel, for holding the exciting fluid of a battery.

Cell (n.) One of the minute elementary structures, of which the greater part of the various tissues and organs of animals and plants are composed.

Cella (n.) The part inclosed within the walls of an ancient temple, as distinguished from the open porticoes.

Cellaret (n.) A receptacle, as in a dining room, for a few bottles of wine or liquor, made in the form of a chest or coffer, or a deep drawer in a sideboard, and usually lined with metal.

Cellepore (n.) A genus of delicate branching corals, made up of minute cells, belonging to the Bryozoa.

Cello (n.) A contraction for Violoncello.

Cellular (a.) Consisting of, or containing, cells; of or pertaining to a cell or cells.

Celluloid (n.) A substance composed essentially of gun cotton and camphor, and when pure resembling ivory in texture and color, but variously colored to imitate coral, tortoise shell, amber, malachite, etc. It is used in the manufacture of jewelry and many small articles, as combs, brushes, collars, and cuffs; -- originally called xylonite.

Cellulose (a.) Consisting of, or containing, cells.

Cellulose (n.) The substance which constitutes the essential part of the solid framework of plants, of ordinary wood, linen, paper, etc. It is also found to a slight extent in certain animals, as the tunicates. It is a carbohydrate, (C6H10O5)n, isomeric with starch, and is convertible into starches and sugars by the action of heat and acids. When pure, it is a white amorphous mass. See Starch, Granulose, Lignin.

Celt (n.) One of an ancient race of people, who formerly inhabited a great part of Central and Western Europe, and whose descendants at the present day occupy Ireland, Wales, the Highlands of Scotland, and the northern shores of France.

Cement (n.) To overlay or coat with cement; as, to cement a cellar bottom.

Cement (v. i.) To become cemented or firmly united; to cohere.

Cementation (n.) A process which consists in surrounding a solid body with the powder of other substances, and heating the whole to a degree not sufficient to cause fusion, the physical properties of the body being changed by chemical combination with powder; thus iron becomes steel by cementation with charcoal, and green glass becomes porcelain by cementation with sand.

Cenobite (n.) One of a religious order, dwelling in a convent, or a community, in opposition to an anchoret, or hermit, who lives in solitude.

Cenogamy (n.) The state of a community which permits promiscuous sexual intercourse among its members, as in certain societies practicing communism.

Censor (n.) One of two magistrates of Rome who took a register of the number and property of citizens, and who also exercised the office of inspector of morals and conduct.

Censor (n.) One who is empowered to examine manuscripts before they are committed to the press, and to forbid their publication if they contain anything obnoxious; -- an official in some European countries.

Censorial (a.) Belonging to a censor, or to the correction of public morals.

Censorious (a.) Addicted to censure; apt to blame or condemn; severe in making remarks on others, or on their writings or manners.

Censual (a.) Relating to, or containing, a census.

Censurable (a.) Deserving of censure; blamable; culpable; reprehensible; as, a censurable person, or censurable conduct.

Censure (n.) The act of blaming or finding fault with and condemning as wrong; reprehension; blame.

Censure (n.) Judicial or ecclesiastical sentence or reprimand; condemnatory judgment.

Censure (v. i.) To find fault with and condemn as wrong; to blame; to express disapprobation of.

Censure (v. i.) To condemn or reprimand by a judicial or ecclesiastical sentence.

Census (n.) An official registration of the number of the people, the value of their estates, and other general statistics of a country.

Cent (n.) A United States coin, the hundredth part of a dollar, formerly made of copper, now of copper, tin, and zinc.

Centaur (n.) A constellation in the southern heavens between Hydra and the Southern Cross.

Centaurea (n.) A large genus of composite plants, related to the thistles and including the cornflower or bluebottle (Centaurea Cyanus) and the star thistle (C. Calcitrapa).

Centenary (a.) Relating to, or consisting of, a hundred.

Centenary (n.) A commemoration or celebration of an event which occurred a hundred years before.

Centennial (a.) Relating to, or associated with, the commemoration of an event that happened a hundred years before; as, a centennial ode.

Center (n.) A principal or important point of concentration; the nucleus around which things are gathered or to which they tend; an object of attention, action, or force; as, a center of attaction.

Center (n.) Those members of a legislative assembly (as in France) who support the existing government. They sit in the middle of the legislative chamber, opposite the presiding officer, between the conservatives or monarchists, who sit on the right of the speaker, and the radicals or advanced republicans who occupy the seats on his left, See Right, and Left.

Center (n.) A temporary structure upon which the materials of a vault or arch are supported in position until the work becomes self-supporting.

Center (n.) One of the two conical steel pins, in a lathe, etc., upon which the work is held, and about which it revolves.

Center (n.) A conical recess, or indentation, in the end of a shaft or other work, to receive the point of a center, on which the work can turn, as in a lathe.

Centre (v. i.) To be collected to a point; to be concentrated; to rest on, or gather about, as a center.

Centre (v. t.) To collect to a point; to concentrate.

Centreboard (n.) A movable or sliding keel formed of a broad board or slab of wood or metal which may be raised into a water-tight case amidships, when in shallow water, or may be lowered to increase the area of lateral resistance and prevent leeway when the vessel is beating to windward. It is used in vessels of all sizes along the coast of the United States

Centesimo (n.) A copper coin of Italy and Spain equivalent to a centime.

Centime (n.) The hundredth part of a franc; a small French copper coin and money of account.

Centner (n.) The commercial hundredweight in several of the continental countries, varying in different places from 100 to about 112 pounds.

Cento (n.) A literary or a musical composition formed by selections from different authors disposed in a new order.

Centonism (n.) The composition of a cento; the act or practice of composing a cento or centos.

Central (a.) Relating to the center; situated in or near the center or middle; containing the center; of or pertaining to the parts near the center; equidistant or equally accessible from certain points.

Centralism (n.) The state or condition of being central; the combination of several parts into one whole; centralization.

Centralization (n.) The act or process of centralizing, or the state of being centralized; the act or process of combining or reducing several parts into a whole; as, the centralization of power in the general government; the centralization of commerce in a city.

Centralize (v. t.) To draw or bring to a center point; to gather into or about a center; to bring into one system, or under one control.

Centriscoid (a.) Allied to, or resembling, the genus Centriscus, of which the bellows fish is an example.

Centrolinead (n.) An instrument for drawing lines through a point, or lines converging to a center.

Centumvir (n.) One of a court of about one hundred judges chosen to try civil suits. Under the empire the court was increased to 180, and met usually in four sections.

Centurion (n.) A military officer who commanded a minor division of the Roman army; a captain of a century.

Century (n.) A division of the Roman people formed according to their property, for the purpose of voting for civil officers.

Century (n.) One of sixty companies into which a legion of the army was divided. It was Commanded by a centurion.

Cephalo () A combining form denoting the head, of the head, connected with the head; as, cephalosome, cephalopod.

Cephaloptera (n.) One of the generic names of the gigantic ray (Manta birostris), known as devilfish and sea devil. It is common on the coasts of South Carolina, Florida, and farther south. Some of them grow to enormous size, becoming twenty feet of more across the body, and weighing more than a ton.

Cephalothorax (n.) The anterior portion of any one of the Arachnida and higher Crustacea, consisting of the united head and thorax.

Cepheus (n.) A northern constellation near the pole. Its head, which is in the Milky Way, is marked by a triangle formed by three stars of the fourth magnitude. See Cassiopeia.

Ceraceous (a.) Having the texture and color of new wax; like wax; waxy.

Cerargyrite (n.) Native silver chloride, a mineral of a white to pale yellow or gray color, darkening on exposure to the light. It may be cut by a knife, like lead or horn (hence called horn silver).

Cerasinous (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, cerasin.

Cerasinous (a.) Of a cherry color.

Cerate (n.) An unctuous preparation for external application, of a consistence intermediate between that of an ointment and a plaster, so that it can be spread upon cloth without the use of heat, but does not melt when applied to the skin.

Ceratodus (n.) A genus of ganoid fishes, of the order Dipnoi, first known as Mesozoic fossil fishes; but recently two living species have been discovered in Australian rivers. They have lungs so well developed that they can leave the water and breathe in air. In Australia they are called salmon and baramunda. See Dipnoi, and Archipterygium.

Ceratosaurus (n.) A carnivorous American Jurassic dinosaur allied to the European Megalosaurus. The animal was nearly twenty feet in length, and the skull bears a bony horn core on the united nasal bones. See Illustration in Appendix.

Ceratospongiae (n. pl.) An order of sponges in which the skeleton consists of horny fibers. It includes all the commercial sponges.

Ceraunoscope (n.) An instrument or apparatus employed in the ancient mysteries to imitate thunder and lightning.

Cercopod (n.) One of the jointed antenniform appendages of the posterior somites of certain insects.

Cercus (n.) See Cercopod.

Cere (v. t.) To wax; to cover or close with wax.

Cerealin (n.) A nitrogenous substance closely resembling diastase, obtained from bran, and possessing the power of converting starch into dextrin, sugar, and lactic acid.

Cerebellum (n.) The large lobe of the hind brain in front of and above the medulla; the little brain. It controls combined muscular action. See Brain.

Cerebral (n.) One of a class of lingual consonants in the East Indian languages. See Lingual, n.

Cerebration (n.) Action of the brain, whether conscious or unconscious.

Cerebrifugal (a.) Applied to those nerve fibers which go from the brain to the spinal cord, and so transfer cerebral impulses (centrifugal impressions) outwards.

Cerebrin (n.) A nonphosphorized, nitrogenous substance, obtained from brain and nerve tissue by extraction with boiling alcohol. It is uncertain whether it exists as such in nerve tissue, or is a product of the decomposition of some more complex substance.

Cerebripetal (a.) Applied to those nerve fibers which go from the spinal cord to the brain and so transfer sensations (centripetal impressions) from the exterior inwards.

Cerebropathy (n.) A hypochondriacal condition verging upon insanity, occurring in those whose brains have been unduly taxed; -- called also brain fag.

Cerebroscopy (n.) Examination of the brain for the diagnosis of disease; esp., the act or process of diagnosticating the condition of the brain by examination of the interior of the eye (as with an ophthalmoscope).

Cerebrose (n.) A sugarlike body obtained by the decomposition of the nitrogenous non-phosphorized principles of the brain.

Cerebro-spinal (a.) Of or pertaining to the central nervous system consisting of the brain and spinal cord.

Ceremonial (a.) Relating to ceremony, or external rite; ritual; according to the forms of established rites.

Ceremonial (n.) A system of rules and ceremonies, enjoined by law, or established by custom, in religious worship, social intercourse, or the courts of princes; outward form.

Ceremonial (n.) The order for rites and forms in the Roman Catholic church, or the book containing the rules prescribed to be observed on solemn occasions.

Ceremonially (adv.) According to rites and ceremonies; as, a person ceremonially unclean.

Ceremonious (a.) According to prescribed or customary rules and forms; devoted to forms and ceremonies; formally respectful; punctilious.

Ceremony (n.) Ar act or series of acts, often of a symbolical character, prescribed by law, custom, or authority, in the conduct of important matters, as in the performance of religious duties, the transaction of affairs of state, and the celebration of notable events; as, the ceremony of crowning a sovereign; the ceremonies observed in consecrating a church; marriage and baptismal ceremonies.

Ceres (n.) The daughter of Saturn and Ops or Rhea, the goddess of corn and tillage.

Ceres (n.) The first discovered asteroid.

Cerin (n.) A waxy substance extracted by alcohol or ether from cork; sometimes applied also to the portion of beeswax which is soluble in alcohol.

Cerise (a.) Cherry-colored; a light bright red; -- applied to textile fabrics, especially silk.

Cerite (n.) A mineral of a brownish of cherry-red color, commonly massive. It is a hydrous silicate of cerium and allied metals.

Cerium (n.) A rare metallic element, occurring in the minerals cerite, allanite, monazite, etc. Symbol Ce. Atomic weight 141.5. It resembles iron in color and luster, but is soft, and both malleable and ductile. It tarnishes readily in the air.

Cero (n.) A large and valuable fish of the Mackerel family, of the genus Scomberomorus. Two species are found in the West Indies and less commonly on the Atlantic coast of the United States, -- the common cero (Scomberomorus caballa), called also kingfish, and spotted, or king, cero (S. regalis).

Cerolite (n.) A hydrous silicate of magnesium, allied to serpentine, occurring in waxlike masses of a yellow or greenish color.

Ceroma (n.) The unguent (a composition of oil and wax) with which wrestlers were anointed among the ancient Romans.

Ceroon (n.) A bale or package. covered with hide, or with wood bound with hide; as, a ceroon of indigo, cochineal, etc.

Cerotic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, beeswax or Chinese wax; as, cerotic acid or alcohol.

Cerotin (n.) A white crystalline substance, C27H55.OH, obtained from Chinese wax, and regarded as an alcohol of the marsh gas series; -- called also cerotic alcohol, ceryl alcohol.

Certain (a.) Assured in mind; having no doubts; free from suspicions concerning.

Certainty (n.) The quality, state, or condition, of being certain.

Certify (v. t.) To testify to in writing; to make a declaration concerning, in writing, under hand, or hand and seal.

Certiorari (n.) A writ issuing out of chancery, or a superior court, to call up the records of a inferior court, or remove a cause there depending, in order that the party may have more sure and speedy justice, or that errors and irregularities may be corrected. It is obtained upon complaint of a party that he has not received justice, or can not have an impartial trial in the inferior court.

Cerulean (a.) Sky-colored; blue; azure.

Cerulific (a.) Producing a blue or sky color.

Ceruse (n.) A cosmetic containing white lead.

Cerussite (n.) Native lead carbonate; a mineral occurring in colorless, white, or yellowish transparent crystals, with an adamantine, also massive and compact.

Ceryl (n.) A radical, C27H55 supposed to exist in several compounds obtained from Chinese wax, beeswax, etc.

Cespitine (n.) An oil obtained by distillation of peat, and containing various members of the pyridine series.

Cespitous (a.) Pertaining to, consisting, of resembling, turf; turfy.

Cessation (n.) A ceasing or discontinuance, as of action, whether temporary or final; a stop; as, a cessation of the war.

Cessavit (n.) A writ given by statute to recover lands when the tenant has for two years failed to perform the conditions of his tenure.

Cession (n.) Concession; compliance.

Cesspool (n.) A cistern in the course, or the termination, of a drain, to collect sedimentary or superfluous matter; a privy vault; any receptacle of filth.

Cestoidea (n. pl.) A class of parasitic worms (Platelminthes) of which the tapeworms are the most common examples. The body is flattened, and usually but not always long, and composed of numerous joints or segments, each of which may contain a complete set of male and female reproductive organs. They have neither mouth nor intestine. See Tapeworm.

Cestus (n.) A genus of Ctenophora. The typical species (Cestus Veneris) is remarkable for its brilliant iridescent colors, and its long, girdlelike form.

Cestus (n.) A covering for the hands of boxers, made of leather bands, and often loaded with lead or iron.

Cete (n.) One of the Cetacea, or collectively, the Cetacea.

Cetrarin (n.) A white substance extracted from the lichen, Iceland moss (Cetraria Islandica). It consists of several ingredients, among which is cetraric acid, a white, crystalline, bitter substance.

Cetyl (n.) A radical, C16H33, not yet isolated, but supposed to exist in a series of compounds homologous with the ethyl compounds, and derived from spermaceti.

C. G. S. () An abbreviation for Centimeter, Gram, Second. -- applied to a system of units much employed in physical science, based upon the centimeter as the unit of length, the gram as the unit of weight or mass, and the second as the unit of time.

Cabazite (n.) A mineral occuring in glassy rhombohedral crystals, varying, in color from white to yellow or red. It is essentially a hydrous silicate of alumina and lime. Called also chabasie.

Chaconne (n.) An old Spanish dance in moderate three-four measure, like the Passacaglia, which is slower. Both are used by classical composers as themes for variations.

Chaetetes (n.) A genus of fossil corals, common in the lower Silurian limestones.

Chaetodont (n.) A marine fish of the family Chaetodontidae. The chaetodonts have broad, compressed bodies, and usually bright colors.

Chafe (v. i.) To rub; to come together so as to wear by rubbing; to wear by friction.

Chafer (n.) A kind of beetle; the cockchafer. The name is also applied to other species; as, the rose chafer.

Chaff (n.) Anything of a comparatively light and worthless character; the refuse part of anything.

Chaffinch (n.) A bird of Europe (Fringilla coelebs), having a variety of very sweet songs, and highly valued as a cage bird; -- called also copper finch.

Chaffy (a.) Resembling chaff; composed of light dry scales.

Chaffy (a.) Bearing or covered with dry scales, as the under surface of certain ferns, or the disk of some composite flowers.

Chain (n.) A series of links or rings, usually of metal, connected, or fitted into one another, used for various purposes, as of support, of restraint, of ornament, of the exertion and transmission of mechanical power, etc.

Chain (n.) That which confines, fetters, or secures, as a chain; a bond; as, the chains of habit.

Chain (n.) A series of things linked together; or a series of things connected and following each other in succession; as, a chain of mountains; a chain of events or ideas.

Chain (n.) An instrument which consists of links and is used in measuring land.

Chain (n.) Iron links bolted to the side of a vessel to bold the dead-eyes connected with the shrouds; also, the channels.

Chain (v. t.) To fasten, bind, or connect with a chain; to fasten or bind securely, as with a chain; as, to chain a bulldog.

Chain pump () A pump consisting of an endless chain, running over a drum or wheel by which it is moved, and dipping below the water to be raised. The chain has at intervals disks or lifts which fit the tube through which the ascending part passes and carry the water to the point of discharge.

Chain wheel () An inversion of the chain pump, by which it becomes a motor driven by water.

Chairman (n.) The presiding officer of a committee, or of a public or private meeting, or of any organized body.

Chalaza (n.) The place on an ovule, or seed, where its outer coats cohere with each other and the nucleus.

Chalcedony (n.) A cryptocrystalline, translucent variety of quartz, having usually a whitish color, and a luster nearly like wax.

Chalcocite (n.) Native copper sulphide, called also copper glance, and vitreous copper; a mineral of a black color and metallic luster.

Chalcographer (n.) Alt. of Chalcographist

Chalcographist (n.) An engraver on copper or brass; hence, an engraver of copper plates for printing upon paper.

Chalcography (n.) The act or art of engraving on copper or brass, especially of engraving for printing.

Chalcopyrite (n.) Copper pyrites, or yellow copper ore; a common ore of copper, containing copper, iron, and sulphur. It occurs massive and in tetragonal crystals of a bright brass yellow color.

Chaldron (n.) An English dry measure, being, at London, 36 bushels heaped up, or its equivalent weight, and more than twice as much at Newcastle. Now used exclusively for coal and coke.

Chalet (n.) A summer cottage or country house in the Swiss mountains; any country house built in the style of the Swiss cottages.

Chalk (n.) A soft, earthy substance, of a white, grayish, or yellowish white color, consisting of calcium carbonate, and having the same composition as common limestone.

Chalk (n.) Finely prepared chalk, used as a drawing implement; also, by extension, a compound, as of clay and black lead, or the like, used in the same manner. See Crayon.

Chalkstone (n.) A chalklike concretion, consisting mainly of urate of sodium, found in and about the small joints, in the external ear, and in other situations, in those affected with gout; a tophus.

Chalky (a.) Consisting of, or resembling, chalk; containing chalk; as, a chalky cliff; a chalky taste.

Challenge (n.) An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons.

Challenge (n.) The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign.

Challenge (n.) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause.

Challenge (n.) To call to a contest of any kind; to call to answer; to defy.

Challenge (n.) To call, invite, or summon to answer for an offense by personal combat.

Challenge (n.) To question or demand the countersign from (one who attempts to pass the lines); as, the sentinel challenged us, with "Who comes there?"

Challenge (n.) To object to or take exception to, as to a juror, or member of a court.

Chalybeous (a.) Steel blue; of the color of tempered steel.

Chamber (n.) A compartment or cell; an inclosed space or cavity; as, the chamber of a canal lock; the chamber of a furnace; the chamber of the eye.

Chamber (n.) A room or rooms where a lawyer transacts business; a room or rooms where a judge transacts such official business as may be done out of court.

Chamber (n.) A cavity in a mine, usually of a cubical form, to contain the powder.

Chamberlain (n.) An officer having the direction and management of the private chambers of a nobleman or monarch; hence, in Europe, one of the high officers of a court.

Chameleon (n.) A lizardlike reptile of the genus Chamaeleo, of several species, found in Africa, Asia, and Europe. The skin is covered with fine granulations; the tail is prehensile, and the body is much compressed laterally, giving it a high back.

Chameleonize (v. t.) To change into various colors.

Chamfer (v. t.) To cut a furrow in, as in a column; to groove; to channel; to flute.

Champaign (n.) A flat, open country.

Champerty (n.) The prosecution or defense of a suit, whether by furnishing money or personal services, by one who has no legitimate concern therein, in consideration of an agreement that he shall receive, in the event of success, a share of the matter in suit; maintenance with the addition of an agreement to divide the thing in suit. See Maintenance.

Chappion (n.) One who engages in any contest; esp. one who in ancient times contended in single combat in behalf of another's honor or rights; or one who acts or speaks in behalf of a person or a cause; a defender; an advocate; a hero.

Chappion (n.) One who by defeating all rivals, has obtained an acknowledged supremacy in any branch of athetics or game of skill, and is ready to contend with any rival; as, the champion of England.

Chance (n.) The supposed effect of such an agent; something that befalls, as the result of unknown or unconsidered forces; the issue of uncertain conditions; an event not calculated upon; an unexpected occurrence; a happening; accident; fortuity; casualty.

Chance (v. i.) To happen, come, or arrive, without design or expectation.

Chancel (v. t.) That part of a church, reserved for the use of the clergy, where the altar, or communion table, is placed.

Chancellor (n.) A judicial court of chancery, which in England and in the United States is distinctively a court with equity jurisdiction.

Chance-medley (n.) The killing of another in self-defense upon a sudden and unpremeditated encounter. See Chaud-Medley.

Chancery (n.) In England, formerly, the highest court of judicature next to the Parliament, exercising jurisdiction at law, but chiefly in equity; but under the jurisdiction act of 1873 it became the chancery division of the High Court of Justice, and now exercises jurisdiction only in equity.

Chancery (n.) In the Unites States, a court of equity; equity; proceeding in equity.

Chandelier (n.) A movable parapet, serving to support fascines to cover pioneers.

Chandler (n.) A dealer in other commodities, which are indicated by a word prefixed; as, ship chandler, corn chandler.

Change (v. t.) To alter; to make different; to cause to pass from one state to another; as, to change the position, character, or appearance of a thing; to change the countenance.

Change (v. t.) Specifically: To give, or receive, smaller denominations of money (technically called change) for; as, to change a gold coin or a bank bill.

Change (v. t.) Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of habits or principles.

Change (v. t.) Small money; the money by means of which the larger coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due.

Changeable (a.) Capable of change; subject to alteration; mutable; variable; fickle; inconstant; as, a changeable humor.

Changeable (a.) Appearing different, as in color, in different lights, or under different circumstances; as, changeable silk.

Changeableness (n.) The quality of being changeable; fickleness; inconstancy; mutability.

Changeful (a.) Full of change; mutable; inconstant; fickle; uncertain.

Changeless (a.) That can not be changed; constant; as, a changeless purpose.

Changeling (a.) Given to change; inconstant.

Changer (n.) One apt to change; an inconstant person.

Chank (n.) The East Indian name for the large spiral shell of several species of sea conch much used in making bangles, esp. Turbinella pyrum. Called also chank chell.

Channel (n.) That through which anything passes; means of passing, conveying, or transmitting; as, the news was conveyed to us by different channels.

Channel (n.) A gutter; a groove, as in a fluted column.

Channel (v. t.) To course through or over, as in a channel.

Chanticleer (n.) A cock, so called from the clearness or loudness of his voice in crowing.

Chantry (n.) An endowment or foundation for the chanting of masses and offering of prayers, commonly for the founder.

Chaos (n.) The confused, unorganized condition or mass of matter before the creation of distinct and orderly forms.

Chaos (n.) Any confused or disordered collection or state of things; a confused mixture; confusion; disorder.

Chaotic (a.) Resembling chaos; confused.

Chap (v. t.) To cause to open in slits or chinks; to split; to cause the skin of to crack or become rough.

Chap (n.) One of the jaws or the fleshy covering of a jaw; -- commonly in the plural, and used of animals, and colloquially of human beings.

Chapeau (n.) A hat or covering for the head.

Chapel (n.) a room or recess in a church, containing an altar.

Chapel (n.) A place of worship not connected with a church; as, the chapel of a palace, hospital, or prison.

Chapel (n.) A choir of singers, or an orchestra, attached to the court of a prince or nobleman.

Chapel (v. t.) To cause (a ship taken aback in a light breeze) so to turn or make a circuit as to recover, without bracing the yards, the same tack on which she had been sailing.

Chapelet (n.) A pair of straps, with stirrups, joined at the top and fastened to the pommel or the frame of the saddle, after they have been adjusted to the convenience of the rider.

Chaperon (n.) A matron who accompanies a young lady in public, for propriety, or as a guide and protector.

Chapfallen (a.) Having the lower chap or jaw drooping, -- an indication of humiliation and dejection; crestfallen; discouraged. See Chopfallen.

Chaplain (n.) A clergyman who is officially attached to the army or navy, to some public institution, or to a family or court, for the purpose of performing divine service.

Chaplain (n.) Any person (clergyman or layman) chosen to conduct religious exercises for a society, etc.; as, a chaplain of a Masonic or a temperance lodge.

Chaplet (n.) A bent piece of sheet iron, or a pin with thin plates on its ends, for holding a core in place in the mold.

Chaplet (n.) A tuft of feathers on a peacock's head.

Chapter (n.) An assembly of monks, or of the prebends and other clergymen connected with a cathedral, conventual, or collegiate church, or of a diocese, usually presided over by the dean.

Chapter (n.) A community of canons or canonesses.

Chapter (n.) A bishop's council.

Chapter (n.) A business meeting of any religious community.

Chapter (n.) A location or compartment.

Chapter (v. t.) To correct; to bring to book, i. e., to demand chapter and verse.

Char (n.) To reduce to coal or carbon by exposure to heat; to reduce to charcoal; to burn to a cinder.

Character (n.) Moral quality; the principles and motives that control the life; as, a man of character; his character saves him from suspicion.

Character (n.) Quality, position, rank, or capacity; quality or conduct with respect to a certain office or duty; as, in the miserable character of a slave; in his character as a magistrate; her character as a daughter.

Character (n.) A written statement as to behavior, competency, etc., given to a servant.

Characteristic (a.) Pertaining to, or serving to constitute, the character; showing the character, or distinctive qualities or traits, of a person or thing; peculiar; distinctive.

Characterize (v. t.) To make distinct and recognizable by peculiar marks or traits; to make with distinctive features.

Charbon (n.) A small black spot or mark remaining in the cavity of the corner tooth of a horse after the large spot or mark has become obliterated.

Charbon (n.) A very contagious and fatal disease of sheep, horses, and cattle. See Maligmant pustule.

Charcoal (v. t.) Impure carbon prepared from vegetable or animal substances; esp., coal made by charring wood in a kiln, retort, etc., from which air is excluded. It is used for fuel and in various mechanical, artistic, and chemical processes.

Charcoal (v. t.) Finely prepared charcoal in small sticks, used as a drawing implement.

Charge (v. t.) To lay on or impose, as a task, duty, or trust; to command, instruct, or exhort with authority; to enjoin; to urge earnestly; as, to charge a jury; to charge the clergy of a diocese; to charge an agent.

Charge (v. t.) To place something to the account of as a debt; to debit, as, to charge one with goods. Also, to enter upon the debit side of an account; as, to charge a sum to one.

Charge (v. t.) To call to account; to challenge.

Charge (v. i.) To debit on an account; as, to charge for purchases.

Charge (v. i.) To squat on its belly and be still; -- a command given by a sportsman to a dog.

Charge (v. t.) A person or thing commited or intrusted to the care, custody, or management of another; a trust.

Charge (v. t.) An order; a mandate or command; an injunction.

Charge (v. t.) An address (esp. an earnest or impressive address) containing instruction or exhortation; as, the charge of a judge to a jury; the charge of a bishop to his clergy.

Charge (v. t.) Whatever constitutes a burden on property, as rents, taxes, lines, etc.; costs; expense incurred; -- usually in the plural.

Charge (v. t.) An entry or a account of that which is due from one party to another; that which is debited in a business transaction; as, a charge in an account book.

Chargeable (a.) Serving to create expense; costly; burdensome.

Chargeably (adv.) At great cost; expensively.

Chariot (v. t.) To convey in a chariot.

Chariotee (n.) A light, covered, four-wheeled pleasure carriage with two seats.

Charioteer (n.) A constellation. See Auriga, and Wagones.

Charity (n.) Liberality in judging of men and their actions; a disposition which inclines men to put the best construction on the words and actions of others.

Charivari (n.) A mock serenade of discordant noises, made with kettles, tin horns, etc., designed to annoy and insult.

Chark (n.) Charcoal; a cinder.

Chark (v. t.) To burn to a coal; to char.

Charles's Wain () The group of seven stars, commonly called the Dipper, in the constellation Ursa Major, or Great Bear. See Ursa major, under Ursa.

Charm (n.) A word or combination of words sung or spoken in the practice of magic; a magical combination of words, characters, etc.; an incantation.

Charm (n.) Any small decorative object worn on the person, as a seal, a key, a silver whistle, or the like. Bunches of charms are often worn at the watch chain.

Charm (n.) To subdue, control, or summon by incantation or supernatural influence; to affect by magic.

Charm (n.) To subdue or overcome by some secret power, or by that which gives pleasure; to allay; to soothe.

Charneco (n.) Alt. of Charnico

Charnico (n.) A sort of sweet wine.

Charry (a.) Pertaining to charcoal, or partaking of its qualities.

Chart (v. t.) To lay down in a chart; to map; to delineate; as, to chart a coast.

Charte (n.) The constitution, or fundamental law, of the French monarchy, as established on the restoration of Louis XVIII., in 1814.

Charter (n.) A written evidence in due form of things done or granted, contracts made, etc., between man and man; a deed, or conveyance.

Charter (n.) An instrument in writing, from the sovereign power of a state or country, executed in due form, bestowing rights, franchises, or privileges.

Charter (n.) An act of a legislative body creating a municipal or other corporation and defining its powers and privileges. Also, an instrument in writing from the constituted authorities of an order or society (as the Freemasons), creating a lodge and defining its powers.

Charter (n.) The letting or hiring a vessel by special contract, or the contract or instrument whereby a vessel is hired or let; as, a ship is offered for sale or charter. See Charter party, below.

Chartism (n.) The principles of a political party in England (1838-48), which contended for universal suffrage, the vote by ballot, annual parliaments, equal electoral districts, and other radical reforms, as set forth in a document called the People's Charter.

Chartreuse (n.) An alcoholic cordial, distilled from aromatic herbs; -- made at La Grande Chartreuse.

Charybdis (n.) A dangerous whirlpool on the coast of Sicily opposite Scylla on the Italian coast. It is personified as a female monster. See Scylla.

Chase (v. t.) To follow as if to catch; to pursue; to compel to move on; to drive by following; to cause to fly; -- often with away or off; as, to chase the hens away.

Chase (n.) A rectangular iron frame in which pages or columns of type are imposed.

Chaste (a.) Pure from unlawful sexual intercourse; virtuous; continent.

Chaste (a.) Pure in design and expression; correct; free from barbarisms or vulgarisms; refined; simple; as, a chaste style in composition or art.

Chasten (v. t.) To correct by punishment; to inflict pain upon the purpose of reclaiming; to discipline; as, to chasten a son with a rod.

Chastise (v. t.) To reduce to order or obedience; to correct or purify; to free from faults or excesses.

Chastisement (n.) The act of chastising; pain inflicted for punishment and correction; discipline; punishment.

Chastiser (n.) One who chastises; a punisher; a corrector.

Chastity (n.) The state of being chaste; purity of body; freedom from unlawful sexual intercourse.

Chasuble (n.) The outer vestment worn by the priest in saying Mass, consisting, in the Roman Catholic Church, of a broad, flat, back piece, and a narrower front piece, the two connected over the shoulders only. The back has usually a large cross, the front an upright bar or pillar, designed to be emblematical of Christ's sufferings. In the Greek Church the chasuble is a large round mantle.

Chat (v. i.) To talk in a light and familiar manner; to converse without form or ceremony; to gossip.

Chat (n.) Light, familiar talk; conversation; gossip.

Chat (n.) A bird of the genus Icteria, allied to the warblers, in America. The best known species are the yellow-breasted chat (I. viridis), and the long-tailed chat (I. longicauda). In Europe the name is given to several birds of the family Saxicolidae, as the stonechat, and whinchat.

Chat (n.) A twig, cone, or little branch. See Chit.

Chateau (n.) A manor house or residence of the lord of the manor; a gentleman's country seat; also, particularly, a royal residence; as, the chateau of the Louvre; the chateau of the Luxembourg.

Chatoyant (a.) Having a changeable, varying luster, or color, like that of a changeable silk, or oa a cat's eye in the dark.

Chatoyment (n.) Changeableness of color, as in a mineral; play of colors.

Chattelism (n.) The act or condition of holding chattels; the state of being a chattel.

Chatter (v. i.) To make a noise by rapid collisions.

Chatter (n.) Noise made by collision of the teeth, as in shivering.

Chatterer (n.) A bird of the family Ampelidae -- so called from its monotonous note. The Bohemion chatterer (Ampelis garrulus) inhabits the arctic regions of both continents. In America the cedar bird is a more common species. See Bohemian chatterer, and Cedar bird.

Chattering (n.) The act or habit of talking idly or rapidly, or of making inarticulate sounds; the sounds so made; noise made by the collision of the teeth; chatter.

Chatty (n.) A porous earthen pot used in India for cooling water, etc.

Chaussure (n.) A foot covering of any kind.

Chaw (v. t.) To ruminate in thought; to consider; to keep the mind working upon; to brood over.

Cheap (n.) Having a low price in market; of small cost or price, as compared with the usual price or the real value.

Cheap (n.) Of comparatively small value; common; mean.

Cheap-john (n.) A seller of low-priced or second goods; a hawker.

Cheaply (adv.) At a small price; at a low value; in a common or inferior manner.

Cheapness (n.) Lowness in price, considering the usual price, or real value.

Chebacco (n.) A narrow-sterned boat formerly much used in the Newfoundland fisheries; -- called also pinkstern and chebec.

Chebec (n.) See Chebacco.

Check (n.) A condition of interrupted or impeded progress; arrest; stop; delay; as, to hold an enemy in check.

Check (n.) A mark, certificate, or token, by which, errors may be prevented, or a thing or person may be identified; as, checks placed against items in an account; a check given for baggage; a return check on a railroad.

Check (v. t.) To verify, to guard, to make secure, by means of a mark, token, or other check; to distinguish by a check; to put a mark against (an item) after comparing with an original or a counterpart in order to secure accuracy; as, to check an account; to check baggage.

Checker (n.) To mark with small squares like a checkerboard, as by crossing stripes of different colors.

Checker (n.) To variegate or diversify with different qualities, colors, scenes, or events; esp., to subject to frequent alternations of prosperity and adversity.

Checkerberry (n.) A spicy plant and its bright red berry; the wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens). Also incorrectly applied to the partridge berry (Mitchella repens).

Checkerboard (n.) A board with sixty-four squares of alternate color, used for playing checkers or draughts.

Checkered (a.) Marked with alternate squares or checks of different color or material.

Checkers (v.) A game, called also daughts, played on a checkerboard by two persons, each having twelve men (counters or checkers) which are moved diagonally. The game is ended when either of the players has lost all his men, or can not move them.

Checkerwork (n.) Work consisting of or showing checkers varied alternately as to colors or materials.

Checkmate (n.) A complete check; utter defeat or overthrow.

Checkmate (v. t.) To defeat completely; to terminate; to thwart.

Checkrein (n.) A branch rein connecting the driving rein of one horse of a span or pair with the bit of the other horse.

Checkstring (n.) A cord by which a person in a carriage or horse car may signal to the driver.

Cheek (n.) Those pieces of a machine, or of any timber, or stone work, which form corresponding sides, or which are similar and in pair; as, the cheeks (jaws) of a vise; the cheeks of a gun carriage, etc.

Cheek (n.) Cool confidence; assurance; impudence.

Cheeked (a.) Having a cheek; -- used in composition.

Cheer (n.) The face; the countenance or its expression.

Cheer (v. t.) To infuse life, courage, animation, or hope, into; to inspirit; to solace or comfort.

Cheer (v. i.) To grow cheerful; to become gladsome or joyous; -- usually with up.

Cheerful (a.) Having or showing good spirits or joy; cheering; cheery; contented; happy; joyful; lively; animated; willing.

Cheeringly (adv.) In a manner to cheer or encourage.

Cheerless (a.) Without joy, gladness, or comfort.

Cheese (n.) The curd of milk, coagulated usually with rennet, separated from the whey, and pressed into a solid mass in a hoop or mold.

Cheese (n.) A low courtesy; -- so called on account of the cheese form assumed by a woman's dress when she stoops after extending the skirts by a rapid gyration.

Cheeseparing (a.) Scrimping; mean; as, cheeseparing economy.

Cheesy (a.) Having the nature, qualities, taste, form, consistency, or appearance of cheese.

Chef (n.) The head cook of large establishment, as a club, a family, etc.

Cheiroptera (n. pl.) An order of mammalia, including the bats, having four toes of each of the anterior limbs elongated and connected by a web, so that they can be used like wings in flying. See Bat.

Chekmak (n.) A turkish fabric of silk and cotton, with gold thread interwoven.

Chelerythrine (n.) An alkaloidal principle obtained from the celandine, and named from the red color of its salts. It is a colorless crystalline substance, and acts as an acrid narcotic poison. It is identical with sanguinarine.

Chelicera (n.) One of the anterior pair of mouth organs, terminated by a pincherlike claw, in scorpions and allied Arachnida. They are homologous with the falcers of spiders, and probably with the mandibles of insects.

Chelifer (n.) See Book scorpion, under Book.

Chelonia (n. pl.) An order of reptiles, including the tortoises and turtles, peculiar in having a part of the vertebrae, ribs, and sternum united with the dermal plates so as to form a firm shell. The jaws are covered by a horny beak. See Reptilia; also, Illust. in Appendix.

Chemical (a.) Pertaining to chemistry; characterized or produced by the forces and operations of chemistry; employed in the processes of chemistry; as, chemical changes; chemical combinations.

Chemically (adv.) According to chemical principles; by chemical process or operation.

Chemiloon (n.) A garment for women, consisting of chemise and drawers united in one.

Chemisette (n.) An under-garment, worn by women, usually covering the neck, shoulders, and breast.

Chemism (n.) The force exerted between the atoms of elementary substance whereby they unite to form chemical compounds; chemical attaction; affinity; -- sometimes used as a general expression for chemical activity or relationship.

Chemistry (n.) That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule.

Chemistry (n.) An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo.

Chemolysis (n.) A term sometimes applied to the decomposition of organic substance into more simple bodies, by the use of chemical agents alone.

Chenille (n.) Tufted cord, of silk or worsted, for the trimming of ladies' dresses, for embroidery and fringes, and for the weft of Chenille rugs.

Chequing (n.) A coin. See Sequin.

Cherish (v. t.) To hold dear; to embrace with interest; to indulge; to encourage; to foster; to promote; as, to cherish religious principle.

Cherishment (n.) Encouragement; comfort.

Cherokees (n. pl.) An Appalachian tribe of Indians, formerly inhabiting the region about the head waters of the Tennessee River. They are now mostly settled in the Indian Territory, and have become one of the most civilized of the Indian Tribes.

Cheroot (n.) A kind of cigar, originally brought from Mania, in the Philippine Islands; now often made of inferior or adulterated tobacco.

Cherry (n.) The common garden cherry (Prunus Cerasus), of which several hundred varieties are cultivated for the fruit, some of which are, the begarreau, blackheart, black Tartarian, oxheart, morelle or morello, May-duke (corrupted from Medoc in France).

Cherry (n.) The fruit of the cherry tree, a drupe of various colors and flavors.

Cherry (a.) Like a red cherry in color; ruddy; blooming; as, a cherry lip; cherry cheeks.

Chert (n.) An impure, massive, flintlike quartz or hornstone, of a dull color.

Cherty (a.) Like chert; containing chert; flinty.

Cherub (n.) A mysterious composite being, the winged footstool and chariot of the Almighty, described in Ezekiel i. and x.

Cherub (n.) A symbolical winged figure of unknown form used in connection with the mercy seat of the Jewish Ark and Temple.

Chess (n.) A game played on a chessboard, by two persons, with two differently colored sets of men, sixteen in each set. Each player has a king, a queen, two bishops, two knights, two castles or rooks, and eight pawns.

Chess (n.) A species of brome grass (Bromus secalinus) which is a troublesome weed in wheat fields, and is often erroneously regarded as degenerate or changed wheat; it bears a very slight resemblance to oats, and if reaped and ground up with wheat, so as to be used for food, is said to produce narcotic effects; -- called also cheat and Willard's bromus.

Chesses (n. pl.) The platforms, consisting of two or more planks doweled together, for the flooring of a temporary military bridge.

Chessy copper () The mineral azurite, found in fine crystallization at Chessy, near Lyons; called also chessylite.

Chest (n.) A large box of wood, or other material, having, like a trunk, a lid, but no covering of skin, leather, or cloth.

Chest (n.) A coffin.

Chest (n.) A case in which certain goods, as tea, opium, etc., are transported; hence, the quantity which such a case contains.

Chest (v. i.) To place in a coffin.

Chest (n.) Strife; contention; controversy.

Chested (a.) Having (such) a chest; -- in composition; as, broad-chested; narrow-chested.

Chesterlite (n.) A variety of feldspar found in crystals in the county of Chester, Pennsylvania.

Chestnut (n.) The tree itself, or its light, coarse-grained timber, used for ornamental work, furniture, etc.

Chestnut (n.) A bright brown color, like that of the nut.

Chestnut (a.) Of the color of a chestnut; of a reddish brown color; as, chestnut curls.

Cheve (v. i.) To come to an issue; to turn out; to succeed; as, to cheve well in a enterprise.

Cheviot (n.) A valuable breed of mountain sheep in Scotland, which takes its name from the Cheviot hills.

Chevisance (n.) A making of contracts.

Chevisance (n.) A bargain or contract; an agreement about a matter in dispute, such as a debt; a business compact.

Chevisance (n.) An unlawful agreement or contract.

Chevron (n.) One of the nine honorable ordinaries, consisting of two broad bands of the width of the bar, issuing, respectively from the dexter and sinister bases of the field and conjoined at its center.

Chevron (n.) A distinguishing mark, above the elbow, on the sleeve of a non-commissioned officer's coat.

Chevron (n.) A zigzag molding, or group of moldings, common in Norman architecture.

Chevroned (p. a.) Having a chevron; decorated with an ornamental figure of a zigzag from.

Chiaroscurist (n.) A painter who cares for and studies light and shade rather than color.

Chiaro-oscuro (n.) The arrangement of light and dark parts in a work of art, such as a drawing or painting, whether in monochrome or in color.

Chiasma (n.) A commissure; especially, the optic commissure, or crucial union of the optic nerves.

Chica (n.) A red coloring matter. extracted from the Bignonia Chica, used by some tribes of South American Indians to stain the skin.

Chica (n.) A fermented liquor or beer made in South American from a decoction of maize.

Chiccory (n.) See Chicory.

Chichevache (n.) A fabulous cow of enormous size, whose food was patient wives, and which was therefore in very lean condition.

Chicken-breasted (a.) Having a narrow, projecting chest, caused by forward curvature of the vertebral column.

Chicken-hearted (a.) Timid; fearful; cowardly.

Chick-pea (n.) Its nutritious seed, used in cookery, and especially, when roasted (parched pulse), as food for travelers in the Eastern deserts.

Chicory (n.) A branching perennial plant (Cichorium Intybus) with bright blue flowers, growing wild in Europe, Asia, and America; also cultivated for its roots and as a salad plant; succory; wild endive. See Endive.

Chicory (n.) The root, which is roasted for mixing with coffee.

Chide (p. pr. & vb. n.) To rebuke; to reprove; to scold; to find fault with.

Chide (v. i.) To utter words of disapprobation and displeasure; to find fault; to contend angrily.

Chide (n.) A continuous noise or murmur.

Chidester (n.) A female scold.

Chief (n.) The head or leader of any body of men; a commander, as of an army; a head man, as of a tribe, clan, or family; a person in authority who directs the work of others; the principal actor or agent.

Chief (n.) The upper third part of the field. It is supposed to be composed of the dexter, sinister, and middle chiefs.

Chief (a.) Principal or most eminent in any quality or action; most distinguished; having most influence; taking the lead; most important; as, the chief topic of conversation; the chief interest of man.

Chief baron () The presiding judge of the court of exchequer.

Chief hare () A small rodent (Lagamys princeps) inhabiting the summits of the Rocky Mountains; -- also called crying hare, calling hare, cony, American pika, and little chief hare.

Chief justice () The presiding justice, or principal judge, of a court.

Chieftain (n.) A captain, leader, or commander; a chief; the head of a troop, army, or clan.

Chievance (n.) An unlawful bargain; traffic in which money is exported as discount.

Chigre (n.) A species of flea (Pulex penetrans), common in the West Indies and South America, which often attacks the feet or any exposed part of the human body, and burrowing beneath the skin produces great irritation. When the female is allowed to remain and breed, troublesome sores result, which are sometimes dangerous. See Jigger.

Chikara (n.) The Indian four-horned antelope (Tetraceros quadricornis).

Chilblain (n.) A blain, sore, or inflammatory swelling, produced by exposure of the feet or hands to cold, and attended by itching, pain, and sometimes ulceration.

Child (n.) One who, by character of practice, shows signs of relationship to, or of the influence of, another; one closely connected with a place, occupation, character, etc.; as, a child of God; a child of the devil; a child of disobedience; a child of toil; a child of the people.

Childe (n.) A cognomen formerly prefixed to his name by the oldest son, until he succeeded to his ancestral titles, or was knighted; as, Childe Roland.

Childermas day () A day (December 28) observed by mass or festival in commemoration of the children slain by Herod at Bethlehem; -- called also Holy Innocent's Day.

Childhood (n.) The state of being a child; the time in which persons are children; the condition or time from infancy to puberty.

Childhood (n.) Children, taken collectively.

Childhood (n.) The commencement; the first period.

Childlike (a.) Resembling a child, or that which belongs to children; becoming a child; meek; submissive; dutiful.

Chiliarch (n.) The commander or chief of a thousand men.

Chiliarchy (n.) A body consisting of a thousand men.

Chiliast (n.) One who believes in the second coming of Christ to reign on earth a thousand years; a milllenarian.

Chill (n.) A moderate but disagreeable degree of cold; a disagreeable sensation of coolness, accompanied with shivering.

Chill (n.) A sensation of cold with convulsive shaking of the body, pinched face, pale skin, and blue lips, caused by undue cooling of the body or by nervous excitement, or forming the precursor of some constitutional disturbance, as of a fever.

Chill (n.) A check to enthusiasm or warmth of feeling; discouragement; as, a chill comes over an assembly.

Chill (n.) An iron mold or portion of a mold, serving to cool rapidly, and so to harden, the surface of molten iron brought in contact with it.

Chill (a.) Moderately cold; tending to cause shivering; chilly; raw.

Chill (a.) Affected by cold.

Chill (a.) Characterized by coolness of manner, feeling, etc.; lacking enthusiasm or warmth; formal; distant; as, a chill reception.

Chill (a.) Discouraging; depressing; dispiriting.

Chill (v. t.) To strike with a chill; to make chilly; to cause to shiver; to affect with cold.

Chill (v. t.) To check enthusiasm or warmth of feeling of; to depress; to discourage.

Chill (v. t.) To produce, by sudden cooling, a change of crystallization at or near the surface of, so as to increase the hardness; said of cast iron.

Chill (v. i.) To become surface-hardened by sudden cooling while solidifying; as, some kinds of cast iron chill to a greater depth than others.

Chilliness (n.) A state or sensation of being chilly; a disagreeable sensation of coldness.

Chilliness (n.) A moderate degree of coldness; disagreeable coldness or rawness; as, the chilliness of the air.

Chilling (a.) Making chilly or cold; depressing; discouraging; cold; distant; as, a chilling breeze; a chilling manner.

Chillness (n.) Coolness; coldness; a chill.

Chilly (a.) Moderately cold; cold and raw or damp so as to cause shivering; causing or feeling a disagreeable sensation of cold, or a shivering.

Chilopoda (n. pl.) One of the orders of myriapods, including the centipeds. They have a single pair of elongated legs attached laterally to each segment; well developed jaws; and a pair of thoracic legs converted into poison fangs. They are insectivorous, very active, and some species grow to the length of a foot.

Chime (n.) A set of bells musically tuned to each other; specif., in the pl., the music performed on such a set of bells by hand, or produced by mechanism to accompany the striking of the hours or their divisions.

Chime (n.) Pleasing correspondence of proportion, relation, or sound.

Chime (n.) To sound in harmonious accord, as bells.

Chime (n.) To be in harmony; to agree; to suit; to harmonize; to correspond; to fall in with.

Chime (n.) To join in a conversation; to express assent; -- followed by in or in with.

Chime (n.) To make a rude correspondence of sounds; to jingle, as in rhyming.

Chimera (n.) A vain, foolish, or incongruous fancy, or creature of the imagination; as, the chimera of an author.

Chimerical (a.) Merely imaginary; fanciful; fantastic; wildly or vainly conceived; having, or capable of having, no existence except in thought; as, chimerical projects.

Chimney (n.) That part of a building which contains the smoke flues; esp. an upright tube or flue of brick or stone, in most cases extending through or above the roof of the building. Often used instead of chimney shaft.

Chimney (n.) A tube usually of glass, placed around a flame, as of a lamp, to create a draft, and promote combustion.

Chimney-breast (n.) The horizontal projection of a chimney from the wall in which it is built; -- commonly applied to its projection in the inside of a building only.

Chimney-piece (n.) A decorative construction around the opening of a fireplace.

China (n.) A country in Eastern Asia.

Chinch (n.) A bug (Blissus leucopterus), which, in the United States, is very destructive to grass, wheat, and other grains; -- also called chiniz, chinch bug, chink bug. It resembles the bedbug in its disgusting odor.

Chinchilla (n.) A small rodent (Chinchilla lanigera), of the size of a large squirrel, remarkable for its fine fur, which is very soft and of a pearly gray color. It is a native of Peru and Chili.

Chinchona () Alt. of Chincona

Chincona () See Cinchona.

Chin cough () Whooping cough.

Chine (n.) A piece of the backbone of an animal, with the adjoining parts, cut for cooking. [See Illust. of Beef.]

Chined (a.) Pertaining to, or having, a chine, or backbone; -- used in composition.

Chink (v. t.) To cause to make a sharp metallic sound, as coins, small pieces of metal, etc., by bringing them into collision with each other.

Chink (v. i.) To make a slight, sharp, metallic sound, as by the collision of little pieces of money, or other small sonorous bodies.

Chinned (a.) Having a chin; -- used chiefly in compounds; as, short-chinned.

Chinook (n.) A warm westerly wind from the country of the Chinooks, sometimes experienced on the slope of the Rocky Mountains, in Montana and the adjacent territory.

Chintz (n.) Cotton cloth, printed with flowers and other devices, in a number of different colors, and often glazed.

Chip (n.) Anything dried up, withered, or without flavor; -- used contemptuously.

Chip (n.) One of the counters used in poker and other games.

Chipmunk (n.) A squirrel-like animal of the genus Tamias, sometimes called the striped squirrel, chipping squirrel, ground squirrel, hackee. The common species of the United States is the Tamias striatus.

Chippy (n.) A small American sparrow (Spizella socialis), very common near dwelling; -- also called chipping bird and chipping sparrow, from its simple note.

Chirograph (n.) A writing which, requiring a counterpart, was engrossed twice on the same piece of parchment, with a space between, in which was written the word chirographum, through which the parchment was cut, and one part given to each party. It answered to what is now called a charter party.

Chirograph (n.) The last part of a fine of land, commonly called the foot of the fine.

Chirogymnast (n.) A mechanical contrivance for exercising the fingers of a pianist.

Chirologist (n.) One who communicates thoughts by signs made with the hands and fingers.

Chirology (n.) The art or practice of using the manual alphabet or of communicating thoughts by sings made by the hands and fingers; a substitute for spoken or written language in intercourse with the deaf and dumb. See Dactylalogy.

Chiropodist (n.) One who treats diseases of the hands and feet; especially, one who removes corns and bunions.

Chirre (v. i.) To coo, as a pigeon.

Chit (n.) The embryo or the growing bud of a plant; a shoot; a sprout; as, the chits of Indian corn or of potatoes.

Chitinization (n.) The process of becoming chitinous.

Chitinous (a.) Having the nature of chitin; consisting of, or containing, chitin.

Chiton (n.) One of a group of gastropod mollusks, with a shell composed of eight movable dorsal plates. See Polyplacophora.

Chitter (v. i.) To shiver or chatter with cold.

Chivalry (n.) A body or order of cavaliers or knights serving on horseback; illustrious warriors, collectively; cavalry.

Chivalry (n.) The qualifications or character of knights, as valor, dexterity in arms, courtesy, etc.

Chivalry (n.) A tenure of lands by knight's service; that is, by the condition of a knight's performing service on horseback, or of performing some noble or military service to his lord.

Chlamyphore (n.) A small South American edentate (Chlamyphorus truncatus, and C. retusus) allied to the armadillo. It is covered with a leathery shell or coat of mail, like a cloak, attached along the spine.

Chloral (n.) A colorless oily liquid, CCl3.CHO, of a pungent odor and harsh taste, obtained by the action of chlorine upon ordinary or ethyl alcohol.

Chloralamide (n.) A compound of chloral and formic amide used to produce sleep.

Chloralism (n.) A morbid condition of the system resulting from excessive use of chloral.

Chlorhydrin (n.) One of a class of compounds formed from certain polybasic alcohols (and especially glycerin) by the substitution of chlorine for one or more hydroxyl groups.

Chloric (a.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, chlorine; -- said of those compounds of chlorine in which this element has a valence of five, or the next to its highest; as, chloric acid, HClO3.

Chloride (n.) A binary compound of chlorine with another element or radical; as, chloride of sodium (common salt).

Chloridic (a.) Of or pertaining to a chloride; containing a chloride.

Chlorinate (v. t.) To treat, or cause to combine, with chlorine.

Chlorine (n.) One of the elementary substances, commonly isolated as a greenish yellow gas, two and one half times as heavy as air, of an intensely disagreeable suffocating odor, and exceedingly poisonous. It is abundant in nature, the most important compound being common salt. It is powerful oxidizing, bleaching, and disinfecting agent. Symbol Cl. Atomic weight, 35.4.

Chloriodic (a.) Compounded of chlorine and iodine; containing chlorine and iodine.

Chloriodine (n.) A compound of chlorine and iodine.

Chlorite (n.) The name of a group of minerals, usually of a green color and micaceous to granular in structure. They are hydrous silicates of alumina, iron, and magnesia.

Chloritic (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, chlorite; as, chloritic sand.

Chlormethane (n.) A colorless gas, CH3Cl, of a sweet odor, easily condensed to a liquid; -- called also methyl chloride.

Chlorocruorin (n.) A green substance, supposed to be the cause of the green color of the blood in some species of worms.

Chlorodyne (n.) A patent anodyne medicine, containing opium, chloroform, Indian hemp, etc.

Chloroform (n.) A colorless volatile liquid, CHCl3, having an ethereal odor and a sweetish taste, formed by treating alcohol with chlorine and an alkali. It is a powerful solvent of wax, resin, etc., and is extensively used to produce anaesthesia in surgical operations; also externally, to alleviate pain.

Chlorometer (n.) An instrument to test the decoloring or bleaching power of chloride of lime.

Chlorometry (n.) The process of testing the bleaching power of any combination of chlorine.

Chloropal (n.) A massive mineral, greenish in color, and opal-like in appearance. It is essentially a hydrous silicate of iron.

Chlorophane (n.) The yellowish green pigment in the inner segment of the cones of the retina. See Chromophane.

Chlorophyll (n.) Literally, leaf green; a green granular matter formed in the cells of the leaves (and other parts exposed to light) of plants, to which they owe their green color, and through which all ordinary assimilation of plant food takes place. Similar chlorophyll granules have been found in the tissues of the lower animals.

Chlorosis (n.) A disease in plants, causing the flowers to turn green or the leaves to lose their normal green color.

Chlorous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, chlorine; -- said of those compounds of chlorine in which this element has a valence of three, the next lower than in chloric compounds; as, chlorous acid, HClO2.

Chlorous (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the electro-negative character of chlorine; hence, electro-negative; -- opposed to basylous or zincous.

Chlorpicrin (n.) A heavy, colorless liquid, CCl3.NO2, of a strong pungent odor, obtained by subjecting picric acid to the action of chlorine.

Chock (v. t.) To stop or fasten, as with a wedge, or block; to scotch; as, to chock a wheel or cask.

Chock (v. t.) To encounter.

Chock (n.) An encounter.

Chocolate (n.) A paste or cake composed of the roasted seeds of the Theobroma Cacao ground and mixed with other ingredients, usually sugar, and cinnamon or vanilla.

Chocolate (n.) The beverage made by dissolving a portion of the paste or cake in boiling water or milk.

Choir (n.) A band or organized company of singers, especially in church service.

Choke (n.) A constriction in the bore of a shotgun, case of a rocket, etc.

Choke pear () A kind of pear that has a rough, astringent taste, and is swallowed with difficulty, or which contracts the mucous membrane of the mouth.

Choke-strap (n.) A strap leading from the bellyband to the lower part of the collar, to keep the collar in place.

Cholaemaa (n.) A disease characterized by severe nervous symptoms, dependent upon the presence of the constituents of the bile in the blood.

Cholera (n.) One of several diseases affecting the digestive and intestinal tract and more or less dangerous to life, esp. the one commonly called Asiatic cholera.

Chondrification (n.) Formation of, or conversion into, cartilage.

Chondrify (v. t. & i.) To convert, or be converted, into cartilage.

Chondrigen (n.) The chemical basis of cartilage, converted by long boiling in water into a gelatinous body called chondrin.

Chondrin (n.) A colorless, amorphous, nitrogenous substance, tasteless and odorless, formed from cartilaginous tissue by long-continued action of boiling water. It is similar to gelatin, and is a large ingredient of commercial gelatin.

Chondro- () A combining form meaning a grain, granular, granular cartilage, cartilaginous; as, the chondrocranium, the cartilaginous skull of the lower vertebrates and of embryos.

Chondrodite (n.) A fluosilicate of magnesia and iron, yellow to red in color, often occurring in granular form in a crystalline limestone.

Chondroganoidea (n.) An order of ganoid fishes, including the sturgeons; -- so called on account of their cartilaginous skeleton.

Chop (n.) A jaw of an animal; -- commonly in the pl. See Chops.

Chopstick (n.) One of two small sticks of wood, ivory, etc., used by the Chinese and Japanese to convey food to the mouth.

Choragus (n.) A chorus leader; esp. one who provided at his own expense and under his own supervision one of the choruses for the musical contents at Athens.

Choral (n.) A hymn tune; a simple sacred tune, sung in unison by the congregation; as, the Lutheran chorals.

Choralist (n.) A singer or composer of chorals.

Chord (n.) A combination of tones simultaneously performed, producing more or less perfect harmony, as, the common chord.

Chord (n.) A cord. See Cord, n., 4.

Chord (n.) The upper or lower part of a truss, usually horizontal, resisting compression or tension.

Chord (v. i.) To accord; to harmonize together; as, this note chords with that.

Chorda (n.) A cord.

Chordata (n. pl.) A comprehensive division of animals including all Vertebrata together with the Tunicata, or all those having a dorsal nervous cord.

Chorea (n.) St. Vitus's dance; a disease attended with convulsive twitchings and other involuntary movements of the muscles or limbs.

Choreic (a.) Of the nature of, or pertaining to, chorea; convulsive.

Chorepiscopal (a.) Pertaining to a chorepiscopus or his change or authority.

Chorepiscopi (pl. ) of Chorepiscopus

Chorepiscopus (n.) A "country" or suffragan bishop, appointed in the ancient church by a diocesan bishop to exercise episcopal jurisdiction in a rural district.

Choriambus (n.) A foot consisting of four syllables, of which the first and last are long, and the other short (- ~ ~ -); that is, a choreus, or trochee, and an iambus united.

Chorograph (n.) An instrument for constructing triangles in marine surveying, etc.

Choroid (a.) resembling the chorion; as, the choroid plexuses of the ventricles of the brain, and the choroid coat of the eyeball.

Choroid (n.) The choroid coat of the eye. See Eye.

Choroidal (a.) Pertaining to the choroid coat.

Chorus (n.) A company of persons supposed to behold what passed in the acts of a tragedy, and to sing the sentiments which the events suggested in couplets or verses between the acts; also, that which was thus sung by the chorus.

Chorus (n.) A company of singers singing in concert.

Chorus (n.) A composition of two or more parts, each of which is intended to be sung by a number of voices.

Chorus (n.) Parts of a song or hymn recurring at intervals, as at the end of stanzas; also, a company of singers who join with the singer or choir in singer or choir in singing such parts.

Chorus (n.) The simultaneous of a company in any noisy demonstration; as, a Chorus of shouts and catcalls.

Chough (n.) A bird of the Crow family (Fregilus graculus) of Europe. It is of a black color, with a long, slender, curved bill and red legs; -- also called chauk, chauk-daw, chocard, Cornish chough, red-legged crow. The name is also applied to several allied birds, as the Alpine chough.

Chrematistics (n.) The science of wealth; the science, or a branch of the science, of political economy.

Chreotechnics (n.) The science of the useful arts, esp. agriculture, manufactures, and commerce.

Chrism (n.) Olive oil mixed with balm and spices, consecrated by the bishop on Maundy Thursday, and used in the administration of baptism, confirmation, ordination, etc.

Chrismation (n.) The act of applying the chrism, or consecrated oil.

Christian (n.) One who believes, or professes or is assumed to believe, in Jesus Christ, and the truth as taught by Him; especially, one whose inward and outward life is conformed to the doctrines of Christ.

Christian (n.) One born in a Christian country or of Christian parents, and who has not definitely becomes an adherent of an opposing system.

Christian (n.) One of a Christian denomination which rejects human creeds as bases of fellowship, and sectarian names. They are congregational in church government, and baptize by immersion. They are also called Disciples of Christ, and Campbellites.

Christian (n.) One of a sect (called Christian Connection) of open-communion immersionists. The Bible is their only authoritative rule of faith and practice.

Christian (a.) Pertaining to the church; ecclesiastical; as, a Christian court.

Christianity (n.) Practical conformity of one's inward and outward life to the spirit of the Christian religion

Christianization (n.) The act or process of converting or being converted to a true Christianity.

Christianize (v. t.) To make Christian; to convert to Christianity; as, to Christianize pagans.

Christianize (v. i.) To adopt the character or belief of a Christian; to become Christian.

Christianlike (a.) Becoming to a Christian.

Christianly (adv.) In a manner becoming the principles of the Christian religion.

Christ's-thorn (n.) One of several prickly or thorny shrubs found in Palestine, especially the Paliurus aculeatus, Zizyphus Spina-Christi, and Z. vulgaris. The last bears the fruit called jujube, and may be considered to have been the most readily obtainable for the Crown of Thorns.

Chromascope (n.) An instrument for showing the optical effects of color.

Chromatic (a.) Relating to color, or to colors.

Chromatics (n.) The science of colors; that part of optics which treats of the properties of colors.

Chromatism (n.) The state of being colored, as in the case of images formed by a lens.

Chromatism (n.) An abnormal coloring of plants.

Chromatogenous (a.) Producing color.

Chromatography (n.) A treatise on colors

Chromatology (n.) A treatise on colors.

Chromatophore (n.) A contractile cell or vesicle containing liquid pigment and capable of changing its form or size, thus causing changes of color in the translucent skin of such animals as possess them. They are highly developed and numerous in the cephalopods.

Chromatophore (n.) One of the granules of protoplasm, which in mass give color to the part of the plant containing them.

Chromatoscope (n.) A reflecting telescope, part of which is made to rotate eccentrically, so as to produce a ringlike image of a star, instead of a point; -- used in studying the scintillation of the stars.

Chromatrope (n.) An instrument for exhibiting certain chromatic effects of light (depending upon the persistence of vision and mixture of colors) by means of rapidly rotating disks variously colored.

Chromatrope (n.) A device in a magic lantern or stereopticon to produce kaleidoscopic effects.

Chromatype (n.) A colored photographic picture taken upon paper made sensitive with potassium bichromate or some other salt of chromium.

Chromic (a.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, chromium; -- said of the compounds of chromium in which it has its higher valence.

Chromidrosis (n.) Secretion of abnormally colored perspiration.

Chromite (n.) A black submetallic mineral consisting of oxide of chromium and iron; -- called also chromic iron.

Chromite (n.) A compound or salt of chromous hydroxide regarded as an acid.

Chromium (n.) A comparatively rare element occurring most abundantly in the mineral chromite. Atomic weight 52.5. Symbol Cr. When isolated it is a hard, brittle, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty. Its chief commercial importance is for its compounds, as potassium chromate, lead chromate, etc., which are brilliantly colored and are used dyeing and calico printing. Called also chrome.

Chromogen () Vegetable coloring matter other than green; chromule.

Chromogen () Any colored compound, supposed to contain one or more chromophores.

Chromograph (n.) An apparatus by which a number of copies of written matter, maps, plans, etc., can be made; -- called also hectograph.

Chromolithograph (n.) A picture printed in tints and colors by repeated impressions from a series of stones prepared by the lithographic process.

Chromolithography (n.) Lithography adapted to printing in inks of various colors.

Chromophane (n.) A general name for the several coloring matters, red, green, yellow, etc., present in the inner segments in the cones of the retina, held in solution by fats, and slowly decolorized by light; distinct from the photochemical pigments of the rods of the retina.

Chromophore (n.) Any chemical group or residue (as NO2; N2; or O2) which imparts some decided color to the compound of which it is an ingredient.

Chromophotography (n.) The art of producing photographs in colors.

Chromophotolithograph (n.) A photolithograph printed in colors.

Chromoplastid (n.) A protoplasmic granule of some other color than green; -- also called chromoleucite.

Chromosphere (n.) An atmosphere of rare matter, composed principally of incandescent hydrogen gas, surrounding the sun and enveloping the photosphere. Portions of the chromosphere are here and there thrown up into enormous tongues of flame.

Chromotype (n.) A sheet printed in colors by any process, as a chromolithograph. See Chromolithograph.

Chromotype (n.) A photographic picture in the natural colors.

Chromous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, chromium, when this element has a valence lower than that in chromic compounds.

Chromule (n.) A general name for coloring matter of plants other than chlorophyll, especially that of petals.

Chronic (a.) Relating to time; according to time.

Chronicle (n.) An historical register or account of facts or events disposed in the order of time.

Chronicle (n.) A narrative of events; a history; a record.

Chronicle (v. t.) To record in a history or chronicle; to record; to register.

Chronicler (n.) A writer of a chronicle; a recorder of events in the order of time; an historian.

Chronogram (n.) An inscription in which certain numeral letters, made to appear specially conspicuous, on being added together, express a particular date or epoch, as in the motto of a medal struck by Gustavus Adolphus in 1632: ChrIstVs DVX; ergo trIVMphVs.- the capitals of which give, when added as numerals, the sum 1632.

Chronogram (n.) The record or inscription made by a chronograph.

Chronogrammatical (a.) Belonging to a chronogram, or containing one.

Chronograph (n.) An instrument for measuring or recording intervals of time, upon a revolving drum or strip of paper moved by clockwork. The action of the stylus or pen is controlled by electricity.

Chronograph (n.) A chronoscope.

Chronography (n.) A description or record of past time; history.

Chronological (a.) Relating to chronology; containing an account of events in the order of time; according to the order of time; as, chronological tables.

Chronometer (n.) A portable timekeeper, with a heavy compensation balance, and usually beating half seconds; -- intended to keep time with great accuracy for use an astronomical observations, in determining longitude, etc.

Chronopher (n.) An instrument signaling the correct time to distant points by electricity.

Chronoscope (n.) An instrument for measuring minute intervals of time; used in determining the velocity of projectiles, the duration of short-lived luminous phenomena, etc.

Chrysaniline (n.) A yellow substance obtained as a by-product in the manufacture of rosaniline. It dyes silk a fine golden-yellow color.

Chrysanthemum (n.) A genus of composite plants, mostly perennial, and of many species including the many varieties of garden chrysanthemums (annual and perennial), and also the feverfew and the oxeye daisy.

Chrysarobin (n.) A bitter, yellow substance forming the essential constituent of Goa powder, and yielding chrysophanic acid proper; hence formerly called also chrysphanic acid.

Chrysaurin (n.) An orange-colored dyestuff, of artificial production.

Chrysene (n.) One of the higher aromatic hydrocarbons of coal tar, allied to naphthalene and anthracene. It is a white crystalline substance, C18H12, of strong blue fluorescence, but generally colored yellow by impurities.

Chrysoberyl (n.) A mineral, found in crystals, of a yellow to green or brown color, and consisting of aluminia and glucina. It is very hard, and is often used as a gem.

Chrysocolla (n.) A hydrous silicate of copper, occurring massive, of a blue or greenish blue color.

Chrysolite (n.) A mineral, composed of silica, magnesia, and iron, of a yellow to green color. It is common in certain volcanic rocks; -- called also olivine and peridot. Sometimes used as a gem. The name was also early used for yellow varieties of tourmaline and topaz.

Chrysology (n.) That branch of political economy which relates to the production of wealth.

Chrysophane (n.) A glucoside extracted from rhubarb as a bitter, yellow, crystalline powder, and yielding chrysophanic acid on decomposition.

Chrysoprase (n.) An apple-green variety of chalcedony, colored by nickel. It has a dull flinty luster, and is sometimes used in jewelry.

Chub (n.) A species to fresh-water fish of the Cyprinidae or Carp family. The common European species is Leuciscus cephalus; the cheven. In America the name is applied to various fishes of the same family, of the genera Semotilus, Squalius, Ceratichthys, etc., and locally to several very different fishes, as the tautog, black bass, etc.

Chuck (n.) A word of endearment; -- corrupted from chick.

Chuck (n.) A contrivance or machine fixed to the mandrel of a lathe, for holding a tool or the material to be operated upon.

Chuck (n.) A piece of the backbone of an animal, from between the neck and the collar bone, with the adjoining parts, cut for cooking; as, a chuck steak; a chuck roast.

Chuckle (v. t.) To fondle; to cocker.

Chuff (n.) A coarse or stupid fellow.

Chulan (n.) The fragrant flowers of the Chloranthus inconspicuus, used in China for perfuming tea.

Chum (n.) A roommate, especially in a college or university; an old and intimate friend.

Chum (v. i.) To occupy a chamber with another; as, to chum together at college.

Church (n.) The collective body of Christians.

Church (n.) The aggregate of religious influences in a community; ecclesiastical influence, authority, etc.; as, to array the power of the church against some moral evil.

Church (v. t.) To bless according to a prescribed form, or to unite with in publicly returning thanks in church, as after deliverance from the dangers of childbirth; as, the churching of women.

Church-ale (n.) A church or parish festival (as in commemoration of the dedication of a church), at which much ale was used.

Churchlike (a.) Befitting a church or a churchman; becoming to a clergyman.

Churchman (n.) An Episcopalian, or a member of the Established Church of England.

Churchmanly (a.) Pertaining to, or becoming, a churchman.

Churchwarden (n.) One of the officers (usually two) in an Episcopal church, whose duties vary in different dioceses, but always include the provision of what is necessary for the communion service.

Churchwarden (n.) A clay tobacco pipe, with a long tube.

Churl (n.) A rustic; a countryman or laborer.

Churlishness (n.) Rudeness of manners or temper; lack of kindness or courtesy.

Chirm (n.) Clamor, or confused noise; buzzing.

Churrus (n.) A powerfully narcotic and intoxicating gum resin which exudes from the flower heads, seeds, etc., of Indian hemp.

Chutnee (n.) A warm or spicy condiment or pickle made in India, compounded of various vegetable substances, sweets, acids, etc.

Chylaceous (a.) Possessed of the properties of chyle; consisting of chyle.

Chyle (n.) A milky fluid containing the fatty matter of the food in a state of emulsion, or fine mechanical division; formed from chyme by the action of the intestinal juices. It is absorbed by the lacteals, and conveyed into the blood by the thoracic duct.

Chylifactive (a.) Producing, or converting into, chyle; having the power to form chyle.

Chyliferous (a.) Transmitting or conveying chyle; as, chyliferous vessels.

Chylify (v. t. & i.) To make chyle of; to be converted into chyle.

Chyluria (n.) A morbid condition in which the urine contains chyle or fatty matter, giving it a milky appearance.

Chymiferous (a.) Bearing or containing chyme.

Chymification (n.) The conversion of food into chyme by the digestive action of gastric juice.

Chyometer (n.) An instrument for measuring liquids. It consists of a piston moving in a tube in which is contained the liquid, the quantity expelled being indicated by the graduation upon the piston rod.

Cibation (n.) The process or operation of feeding the contents of the crucible with fresh material.

Cibol (n.) A perennial alliaceous plant (Allium fistulosum), sometimes called Welsh onion. Its fistular leaves areused in cookery.

Ciborium (n.) A canopy usually standing free and supported on four columns, covering the high altar, or, very rarely, a secondary altar.

Ciborium (n.) The coffer or case in which the host is kept; the pyx.

Cicada (n.) Any species of the genus Cicada. They are large hemipterous insects, with nearly transparent wings. The male makes a shrill sound by peculiar organs in the under side of the abdomen, consisting of a pair of stretched membranes, acted upon by powerful muscles. A noted American species (C. septendecim) is called the seventeen year locust. Another common species is the dogday cicada.

Cicatrix (n.) The pellicle which forms over a wound or breach of continuity and completes the process of healing in the latter, and which subsequently contracts and becomes white, forming the scar.

Cichoraceous (a.) Belonging to, or resembling, a suborder of composite plants of which the chicory (Cichorium) is the type.

Cicisbeism (n.) The state or conduct of a cicisbeo.

Ciclatoun (n.) A costly cloth, of uncertain material, used in the Middle Ages.

Cicuta (n.) a genus of poisonous umbelliferous plants, of which the water hemlock or cowbane is best known.

Cid (n.) Chief or commander; in Spanish literature, a title of Ruy Diaz, Count of Bivar, a champion of Christianity and of the old Spanish royalty, in the 11th century.

Cigar (n.) A small roll of tobacco, used for smoking.

Cigarette (n.) A little cigar; a little fine tobacco rolled in paper for smoking.

Cilia (n. pl.) Small, generally microscopic, vibrating appendages lining certain organs, as the air passages of the higher animals, and in the lower animals often covering also the whole or a part of the exterior. They are also found on some vegetable organisms. In the Infusoria, and many larval forms, they are locomotive organs.

Cilia (n. pl.) Hairlike processes, commonly marginal and forming a fringe like the eyelash.

Ciliary (a.) Pertaining to the cilia, or eyelashes. Also applied to special parts of the eye itself; as, the ciliary processes of the choroid coat; the ciliary muscle, etc.

Ciliary (a.) Pertaining to or connected with the cilia in animal or vegetable organisms; as, ciliary motion.

Ciliata (n. pl.) One of the orders of Infusoria, characterized by having cilia. In some species the cilia cover the body generally, in others they form a band around the mouth.

Cilicious (a.) Made, or consisting, of hair.

Cimbal (n.) A kind of confectionery or cake.

Cimbia (n.) A fillet or band placed around the shaft of a column as if to strengthen it.

Cimolite (n.) A soft, earthy, clayey mineral, of whitish or grayish color.

Cinchona (n.) A genus of trees growing naturally on the Andes in Peru and adjacent countries, but now cultivated in the East Indies, producing a medicinal bark of great value.

Cinchona (n.) The bark of any species of Cinchona containing three per cent. or more of bitter febrifuge alkaloids; Peruvian bark; Jesuits' bark.

Cinchonism (n.) A condition produced by the excessive or long-continued use of quinine, and marked by deafness, roaring in the ears, vertigo, etc.

Cincture (n.) A belt, a girdle, or something worn round the body, -- as by an ecclesiastic for confining the alb.

Cincture (n.) That which encompasses or incloses; an inclosure.

Cincture (n.) The fillet, listel, or band next to the apophyge at the extremity of the shaft of a column.

Cinder (n.) Partly burned or vitrified coal, or other combustible, in which fire is extinct.

Cinder (n.) A hot coal without flame; an ember.

Cinder (n.) The slag of a furnace, or scoriaceous lava from a volcano.

Cindery (a.) Resembling, or composed of, cinders; full of cinders.

Cineraceous (a.) Like ashes; ash-colored; cinereous.

Cineraria (n.) A Linnaean genus of free-flowering composite plants, mostly from South Africa. Several species are cultivated for ornament.

Cinerary (a.) Pertaining to ashes; containing ashes.

Cineration (n.) The reducing of anything to ashes by combustion; cinefaction.

Cinereous (a.) Like ashes; ash-colored; grayish.

Cinerescent (a.) Somewhat cinereous; of a color somewhat resembling that of wood ashes.

Cineritious (a.) Like ashes; having the color of ashes, -- as the cortical substance of the brain.

Cingulum (n.) A distinct girdle or band of color; a raised spiral line as seen on certain univalve shells.

Cinnabarine (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, cinnabar; consisting of cinnabar, or containing it; as, cinnabarine sand.

Cinnamon (n.) The inner bark of the shoots of Cinnamomum Zeylanicum, a tree growing in Ceylon. It is aromatic, of a moderately pungent taste, and is one of the best cordial, carminative, and restorative spices.

Cinnamyl (n.) The hypothetical radical, (C6H5.C2H2)2C, of cinnamic compounds.

Cinnoline (n.) A nitrogenous organic base, C8H6N2, analogous to quinoline, obtained from certain complex diazo compounds.

Cinque Ports () Five English ports, to which peculiar privileges were anciently accorded; -- viz., Hastings, Romney, Hythe, Dover, and Sandwich; afterwards increased by the addition of Winchelsea, Rye, and some minor places.

Cipher (n.) A combination or interweaving of letters, as the initials of a name; a device; a monogram; as, a painter's cipher, an engraver's cipher, etc. The cut represents the initials N. W.

Cipher (n.) A private alphabet, system of characters, or other mode of writing, contrived for the safe transmission of secrets; also, a writing in such characters.

Cipolin (n.) A whitish marble, from Rome, containiing pale greenish zones. It consists of calcium carbonate, with zones and cloudings of talc.

Cippus (n.) A small, low pillar, square or round, commonly having an inscription, used by the ancients for various purposes, as for indicating the distances of places, for a landmark, for sepulchral inscriptions, etc.

Circinate (v. t.) To make a circle around; to encompass.

Circination (n.) A circle; a concentric layer.

Circle (n.) An instrument of observation, the graduated limb of which consists of an entire circle.

Circle (n.) A company assembled, or conceived to assemble, about a central point of interest, or bound by a common tie; a class or division of society; a coterie; a set.

Circle (n.) A form of argument in which two or more unproved statements are used to prove each other; inconclusive reasoning.

Circle (n.) To encompass, as by a circle; to surround; to inclose; to encircle.

Circocele (n.) See Cirsocele.

Circuit (n.) A certain division of a state or country, established by law for a judge or judges to visit, for the administration of justice.

Circuitous (a.) Going round in a circuit; roundabout; indirect; as, a circuitous road; a circuitous manner of accomplishing an end.

Circuity (n.) A going round in a circle; a course not direct; a roundabout way of proceeding.

Circular (a.) repeating itself; ending in itself; reverting to the point of beginning; hence, illogical; inconclusive; as, circular reasoning.

Circular (a.) Addressed to a circle, or to a number of persons having a common interest; circulated, or intended for circulation; as, a circular letter.

Circular (a.) Perfect; complete.

Circular (a.) A circular letter, or paper, usually printed, copies of which are addressed or given to various persons; as, a business circular.

Circulation (n.) The act of moving in a circle, or in a course which brings the moving body to the place where its motion began.

Circulation (n.) Currency; circulating coin; notes, bills, etc., current for coin.

Circulation (n.) The movement of the blood in the blood-vascular system, by which it is brought into close relations with almost every living elementary constituent. Also, the movement of the sap in the vessels and tissues of plants.

Circulatory (n.) A chemical vessel consisting of two portions unequally exposed to the heat of the fire, and with connecting pipes or passages, through which the fluid rises from the overheated portion, and descends from the relatively colder, maintaining a circulation.

Circumambage (n.) A roundabout or indirect course; indirectness.

Circumambiency (n.) The act of surrounding or encompassing.

Circumambient (a.) Surrounding; inclosing or being on all sides; encompassing.

Circumduct (v. t.) To contravene; to nullify; as, to circumduct acts of judicature.

Circumduction (n.) The rotation of a limb round an imaginary axis, so as to describe a concial surface.

Circumesophagal (a.) Surrounding the esophagus; -- in Zool. said of the nerve commissures and ganglia of arthropods and mollusks.

Circumference (n.) The line that goes round or encompasses a circular figure; a periphery.

Circumferential (a.) Pertaining to the circumference; encompassing; encircling; circuitous.

Circumferentor (n.) A surveying instrument, for taking horizontal angles and bearings; a surveyor's compass. It consists of a compass whose needle plays over a circle graduated to 360¡, and of a horizontal brass bar at the ends of which are standards with narrow slits for sighting, supported on a tripod by a ball and socket joint.

Circumflex (n.) A character, or accent, denoting in Greek a rise and of the voice on the same long syllable, marked thus [~ or /]; and in Latin and some other languages, denoting a long and contracted syllable, marked [/ or ^]. See Accent, n., 2.

Circumlocutional (a.) Relating to, or consisting of, circumlocutions; periphrastic; circuitous.

Circummure (v. t.) To encompass with a wall.

Circumnavigate (v. t.) To sail completely round.

Circumscribe (v. t.) To inclose within a certain limit; to hem in; to surround; to bound; to confine; to restrain.

Circumscription (n.) The act of limiting, or the state of being limited, by conditions or restraints; bound; confinement; limit.

Circumspect (a.) Attentive to all the circumstances of a case or the probable consequences of an action; cautious; prudent; wary.

Circumspective (a.) Looking around every way; cautious; careful of consequences; watchful of danger.

Circumstanced (p. a.) Placed in a particular position or condition; situated.

Circumstantiate (v. t.) To prove or confirm by circumstances; to enter into details concerning.

Circumvest (v. t.) To cover round, as with a garment; to invest.

Circus (n.) A level oblong space surrounded on three sides by seats of wood, earth, or stone, rising in tiers one above another, and divided lengthwise through the middle by a barrier around which the track or course was laid out. It was used for chariot races, games, and public shows.

Circus (n.) A circular inclosure for the exhibition of feats of horsemanship, acrobatic displays, etc. Also, the company of performers, with their equipage.

Cirrhosis (n.) A disease of the liver in which it usually becomes smaller in size and more dense and fibrous in consistence; hence sometimes applied to similar changes in other organs, caused by increase in the fibrous framework and decrease in the proper substance of the organ.

Cirripedia (n. pl.) An order of Crustacea including the barnacles. When adult, they have a calcareous shell composed of several pieces. From the opening of the shell the animal throws out a group of curved legs, looking like a delicate curl, whence the name of the group. See Anatifa.

Cirsocele (n.) The varicose dilatation of the spermatic vein.

Cirsoid (a.) Varicose.

Cisatlantic (a.) On this side of the Atlantic Ocean; -- used of the eastern or the western side, according to the standpoint of the writer.

Cisco (n.) The Lake herring (Coregonus Artedi), valuable food fish of the Great Lakes of North America. The name is also applied to C. Hoyi, a related species of Lake Michigan.

Cissoid (n.) A curve invented by Diocles, for the purpose of solving two celebrated problems of the higher geometry; viz., to trisect a plane angle, and to construct two geometrical means between two given straight lines.

Cist (n.) A box or chest. Specifically: (a) A bronze receptacle, round or oval, frequently decorated with engravings on the sides and cover, and with feet, handles, etc., of decorative castings. (b) A cinerary urn. See Illustration in Appendix.

Cistern (n.) A natural reservoir; a hollow place containing water.

Cit (n.) A citizen; an inhabitant of a city; a pert townsman; -- used contemptuously.

Citadel (n.) A fortress in or near a fortified city, commanding the city and fortifications, and intended as a final point of defense.

Citation (n.) An official summons or notice given to a person to appear; the paper containing such summons or notice.

Cite (v. t.) To call upon officially or authoritatively to appear, as before a court; to summon.

Cite (v. t.) To refer to or specify, as for support, proof, illustration, or confirmation.

Cite (v. t.) To notify of a proceeding in court.

Citied (a.) Containing, or covered with, cities.

Citigradae (n. pl.) A suborder of Arachnoidea, including the European tarantula and the wolf spiders (Lycosidae) and their allies, which capture their prey by rapidly running and jumping. See Wolf spider.

Citizen (n.) One who is domiciled in a country, and who is a citizen, though neither native nor naturalized, in such a sense that he takes his legal status from such country.

Citizen (a.) Having the condition or qualities of a citizen, or of citizens; as, a citizen soldiery.

Citraconic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or having certain characteristics of, citric and aconitic acids.

Citrination (n.) The process by which anything becomes of the color of a lemon; esp., in alchemy, the state of perfection in the philosopher's stone indicated by its assuming a deep yellow color.

Citrine (a.) Like a citron or lemon; of a lemon color; greenish yellow.

Citron (n.) A fruit resembling a lemon, but larger, and pleasantly aromatic. The thick rind, when candied, is the citron of commerce.

City (n.) A corporate town; in the United States, a town or collective body of inhabitants, incorporated and governed by a mayor and aldermen or a city council consisting of a board of aldermen and a common council; in Great Britain, a town corporate, which is or has been the seat of a bishop, or the capital of his see.

City (n.) The collective body of citizens, or inhabitants of a city.

Civet (n.) A substance, of the consistence of butter or honey, taken from glands in the anal pouch of the civet (Viverra civetta). It is of clear yellowish or brownish color, of a strong, musky odor, offensive when undiluted, but agreeable when a small portion is mixed with another substance. It is used as a perfume.

Civet (n.) The animal that produces civet (Viverra civetta); -- called also civet cat. It is carnivorous, from two to three feet long, and of a brownish gray color, with transverse black bands and spots on the body and tail. It is a native of northern Africa and of Asia. The name is also applied to other species.

Civil (a.) Subject to government; reduced to order; civilized; not barbarous; -- said of the community.

Civil (a.) Having the manners of one dwelling in a city, as opposed to those of savages or rustics; polite; courteous; complaisant; affable.

Civilian (n.) A student of the civil law at a university or college.

Civillty (n.) The state of society in which the relations and duties of a citizen are recognized and obeyed; a state of civilization.

Civily (adv.) In a civil manner; as regards civil rights and privileges; politely; courteously; in a well bred manner.

Clabber (n.) Milk curdled so as to become thick.

Clabber (v. i.) To become clabber; to lopper.

Clachan (n.) A small village containing a church.

Clack (n.) To make a sudden, sharp noise, or a succesion of such noises, as by striking an object, or by collision of parts; to rattle; to click.

Clack (n.) To utter words rapidly and continually, or with abruptness; to let the tongue run.

Clack (v. t.) To utter rapidly and inconsiderately.

Cladophyll (n.) A special branch, resembling a leaf, as in the apparent foliage of the broom (Ruscus) and of the common cultivated smilax (Myrsiphillum).

Claggy (a.) Adhesive; -- said of a roof in a mine to which coal clings.

Claim (n.) A right to claim or demand something; a title to any debt, privilege, or other thing in possession of another; also, a title to anything which another should give or concede to, or confer on, the claimant.

Clairvoyance (n.) A power, attributed to some persons while in a mesmeric state, of discering objects not perceptible by the senses in their normal condition.

Clam (v. t.) To clog, as with glutinous or viscous matter.

Clamminess (n.) State of being clammy or viscous.

Clammy (Compar.) Having the quality of being viscous or adhesive; soft and sticky; glutinous; damp and adhesive, as if covered with a cold perspiration.

Clamor (n.) A great outcry or vociferation; loud and continued shouting or exclamation.

Clamor (n.) Any loud and continued noise.

Clamor (n.) A continued expression of dissatisfaction or discontent; a popular outcry.

Clamor (v. i.) To utter loud sounds or outcries; to vociferate; to complain; to make importunate demands.

Clamp (n.) One of a pair of movable pieces of lead, or other soft material, to cover the jaws of a vise and enable it to grasp without bruising.

Clamp (n.) A mass of bricks heaped up to be burned; or of ore for roasting, or of coal for coking.

Clamp (v. t.) To cover, as vegetables, with earth.

Clan (n.) A tribe or collection of families, united under a chieftain, regarded as having the same common ancestor, and bearing the same surname; as, the clan of Macdonald.

Clan (n.) A clique; a sect, society, or body of persons; esp., a body of persons united by some common interest or pursuit; -- sometimes used contemptuously.

Clancular (a.) Conducted with secrecy; clandestine; concealed.

Clank (n.) A sharp, brief, ringing sound, made by a collision of metallic or other sonorous bodies; -- usually expressing a duller or less resounding sound than clang, and a deeper and stronger sound than clink.

Clap (v. t.) To express contempt or derision.

Clap (v. i.) To come together suddenly with noise.

Clap (n.) A loud noise made by sudden collision; a bang.

Clapboard (v. t.) To cover with clapboards; as, to clapboard the sides of a house.

Clapperclaw (v. t.) To abuse with the tongue; to revile; to scold.

Claptrap (n.) A contrivance for clapping in theaters.

Claque (n.) A collection of persons employed to applaud at a theatrical exhibition.

Clarifier (n.) A vessel in which the process of clarification is conducted; as, the clarifier in sugar works.

Clarify (v. i.) To grow or become clear or transparent; to become free from feculent impurities, as wine or other liquid under clarification.

Clash (v. i.) To meet in opposition; to act in a contrary direction; to come onto collision; to interfere.

Clash (n.) A loud noise resulting from collision; a noisy collision of bodies; a collision.

Clash (n.) Opposition; contradiction; as between differing or contending interests, views, purposes, etc.

Clasp (n.) An adjustable catch, bent plate, or hook, for holding together two objects or the parts of anything, as the ends of a belt, the covers of a book, etc.

Clasper (n.) One of a pair of male copulatory organs, developed on the anterior side of the ventral fins of sharks and other elasmobranchs. See Illust. of Chimaera.

Class (n.) A group of individuals ranked together as possessing common characteristics; as, the different classes of society; the educated class; the lower classes.

Class (n.) A number of students in a school or college, of the same standing, or pursuing the same studies.

Class (n.) A comprehensive division of animate or inanimate objects, grouped together on account of their common characteristics, in any classification in natural science, and subdivided into orders, families, tribes, genera, etc.

Class (n.) One of the sections into which a church or congregation is divided, and which is under the supervision of a class leader.

Classically (adv.) In a classical manner; according to the manner of classical authors.

Classically (adv.) In the manner of classes; according to a regular order of classes or sets.

Classification (n.) The act of forming into a class or classes; a distibution into groups, as classes, orders, families, etc., according to some common relations or affinities.

Classify (v. t.) To distribute into classes; to arrange according to a system; to arrange in sets according to some method founded on common properties or characters.

Classis (n.) An ecclesiastical body or judicatory in certain churches, as the Reformed Dutch. It is intermediate between the consistory and the synod, and corresponds to the presbytery in the Presbyterian church.

Classmate (n.) One who is in the same class with another, as at school or college.

Clatter (n.) A rattling noise, esp. that made by the collision of hard bodies; also, any loud, abrupt sound; a repetition of abrupt sounds.

Claude Lorraine glass () A slightly convex mirror, commonly of black glass, used as a toy for viewing the reflected landscape.

Claudent (a.) Shutting; confining; drawing together; as, a claudent muscle.

Clause (n.) A subordinate portion or a subdivision of a sentence containing a subject and its predicate.

Clausure (n.) The act of shutting up or confining; confinement.

Clavicle (n.) The collar bone, which is joined at one end to the scapula, or shoulder blade, and at the other to the sternum, or breastbone. In man each clavicle is shaped like the letter /, and is situated just above the first rib on either side of the neck. In birds the two clavicles are united ventrally, forming the merrythought, or wishbone.

Clavicorn (a.) Having club-shaped antennae. See Antennae

Clavicorn (n.) One of the Clavicornes.

Clavicornes (n. pl.) A group of beetles having club-shaped antennae.

Clavus (n.) A callous growth, esp. one the foot; a corn.

Claw (n.) To relieve from some uneasy sensation, as by scratching; to tickle; hence, to flatter; to court.

Claw (n.) To rail at; to scold.

Clawback (n.) A flatterer or sycophant.

Clawback (a.) Flattering; sycophantic.

Clay (n.) A soft earth, which is plastic, or may be molded with the hands, consisting of hydrous silicate of aluminium. It is the result of the wearing down and decomposition, in part, of rocks containing aluminous minerals, as granite. Lime, magnesia, oxide of iron, and other ingredients, are often present as impurities.

Clay (v. t.) To cover or manure with clay.

Clayes (n. pl.) Wattles, or hurdles, made with stakes interwoven with osiers, to cover lodgments.

Clayish (a.) Partaking of the nature of clay, or containing particles of it.

Claymore (n.) A large two-handed sword used formerly by the Scottish Highlanders.

Cleading (n.) A jacket or outer covering of wood, etc., to prevent radiation of heat, as from the boiler, cylinder. etc., of a steam engine.

Cleading (n.) The planking or boarding of a shaft, cofferdam, etc.

Clean (superl.) Free from restraint or neglect; complete; entire.

Clean (superl.) Free from that which is corrupting to the morals; pure in tone; healthy.

Cleaning (n.) The afterbirth of cows, ewes, etc.

Cleanness (n.) Purity of life or language; freedom from licentious courses.

Clear (superl.) Without defect or blemish, such as freckles or knots; as, a clear complexion; clear lumber.

Clear (v. i.) To become free from clouds or fog; to become fair; -- often followed by up, off, or away.

Clear (v. i.) To disengage one's self from incumbrances, distress, or entanglements; to become free.

Clearance (n.) The distance by which one object clears another, as the distance between the piston and cylinder head at the end of a stroke in a steam engine, or the least distance between the point of a cogwheel tooth and the bottom of a space between teeth of a wheel with which it engages.

Clearing (n.) A method adopted by banks and bankers for making an exchange of checks held by each against the others, and settling differences of accounts.

Clerestory (n.) The upper story of the nave of a church, containing windows, and rising above the aisle roofs.

Cleavage (n.) The quality possessed by many crystallized substances of splitting readily in one or more definite directions, in which the cohesive attraction is a minimum, affording more or less smooth surfaces; the direction of the dividing plane; a fragment obtained by cleaving, as of a diamond. See Parting.

Cleavers (n.) A species of Galium (G. Aparine), having a fruit set with hooked bristles, which adhere to whatever they come in contact with; -- called also, goose grass, catchweed, etc.

Cleche (a.) Charged with another bearing of the same figure, and of the color of the field, so large that only a narrow border of the first bearing remains visible; -- said of any heraldic bearing. Compare Voided.

Cleistogamous (a.) Having, beside the usual flowers, other minute, closed flowers, without petals or with minute petals; -- said of certain species of plants which possess flowers of two or more kinds, the closed ones being so constituted as to insure self-fertilization.

Clement (a.) Mild in temper and disposition; merciful; compassionate.

Clementine (a.) Of or pertaining to Clement, esp. to St. Clement of Rome and the spurious homilies attributed to him, or to Pope Clement V. and his compilations of canon law.

Clepsydra (n.) A water clock; a contrivance for measuring time by the graduated flow of a liquid, as of water, through a small aperture. See Illust. in Appendix.

Clerical (a.) Of or relating to a clerk or copyist, or to writing.

Clerk (n.) A man who could read; a scholar; a learned person; a man of letters.

Clerk (n.) A parish officer, being a layman who leads in reading the responses of the Episcopal church service, and otherwise assists in it.

Clerk (n.) One employed to keep records or accounts; a scribe; an accountant; as, the clerk of a court; a town clerk.

Clue (n.) A ball of thread, yarn, or cord; also, The thread itself.

Clue (n.) A lower corner of a square sail, or the after corner of a fore-and-aft sail.

Clue (n.) A loop and thimbles at the corner of a sail.

Clue (n.) A combination of lines or nettles by which a hammock is suspended.

Click (n.) A slight sharp noise, such as is made by the cocking of a pistol.

Click (n.) A kind of articulation used by the natives of Southern Africa, consisting in a sudden withdrawal of the end or some other portion of the tongue from a part of the mouth with which it is in contact, whereby a sharp, clicking sound is produced. The sounds are four in number, and are called cerebral, palatal, dental, and lateral clicks or clucks, the latter being the noise ordinarily used in urging a horse forward.

Click (n.) A detent, pawl, or ratchet, as that which catches the cogs of a ratchet wheel to prevent backward motion. See Illust. of Ratched wheel.

Clicker (n.) One who as has charge of the work of a companionship.

Client (n.) One who consults a legal adviser, or submits his cause to his management.

Clientele (n.) The condition or position of a client; clientship

Clientele (n.) The persons who make habitual use of the services of another person; one's clients, collectively; as, the clientele of a lawyer, doctor, notary, etc.

Climacteric (n.) A period in human life in which some great change is supposed to take place in the constitution. The critical periods are thought by some to be the years produced by multiplying 7 into the odd numbers 3, 5, 7, and 9; to which others add the 81st year.

Climate (v. i.) One of thirty regions or zones, parallel to the equator, into which the surface of the earth from the equator to the pole was divided, according to the successive increase of the length of the midsummer day.

Climate (v. i.) The condition of a place in relation to various phenomena of the atmosphere, as temperature, moisture, etc., especially as they affect animal or vegetable life.

Climatize (v. t. & i.) To acclimate or become acclimated.

Clinanthium (n.) The receptacle of the flowers in a composite plant; -- also called clinium.

Clinch (v. t.) To make conclusive; to confirm; to establish; as, to clinch an argument.

Clincher (n.) That which ends a dispute or controversy; a decisive argument.

Clinic (n.) One confined to the bed by sickness.

Clink (n.) A slight, sharp, tinkling sound, made by the collision of sonorous bodies.

Clinker (n.) A mass composed of several bricks run together by the action of the fire in the kiln.

Clinker (n.) Scoria or vitrified incombustible matter, formed in a grate or furnace where anthracite coal in used; vitrified or burnt matter ejected from a volcano; slag.

Clinkstone (n.) An igneous rock of feldspathic composition, lamellar in structure, and clinking under the hammer. See Phonolite.

Clinopinacoid (n.) The plane in crystals of the monoclinic system which is parallel to the vertical and the inclined lateral (clinidiagonal) axes.

Clione (n.) A genus of naked pteropods. One species (Clione papilonacea), abundant in the Arctic Ocean, constitutes a part of the food of the Greenland whale. It is sometimes incorrectly called Clio.

Clip (v. t.) To embrace, hence; to encompass.

Clip (v. t.) To cut off; as with shears or scissors; as, to clip the hair; to clip coin.

Clipper (n.) One who clips; specifically, one who clips off the edges of coin.

Clipping (n.) The act of cutting off, curtailing, or diminishing; the practice of clipping the edges of coins.

Clique (v. i.) A narrow circle of persons associated by common interests or for the accomplishment of a common purpose; -- generally used in a bad sense.

Clitellus (n.) A thickened glandular portion of the body of the adult earthworm, consisting of several united segments modified for reproductive purposes.

Cloaca (n.) The common chamber into which the intestinal, urinary, and generative canals discharge in birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many fishes.

Cloak (n.) A loose outer garment, extending from the neck downwards, and commonly without sleeves. It is longer than a cape, and is worn both by men and by women.

Cloak (n.) That which conceals; a disguise or pretext; an excuse; a fair pretense; a mask; a cover.

Cloak (v. t.) To cover with, or as with, a cloak; hence, to hide or conceal.

Cloakedly (adv.) In a concealed manner.

Cloaking (n.) The act of covering with a cloak; the act of concealing anything.

Cloakroom (n.) A room, attached to any place of public resort, where cloaks, overcoats, etc., may be deposited for a time.

Clock (n.) A machine for measuring time, indicating the hour and other divisions by means of hands moving on a dial plate. Its works are moved by a weight or a spring, and it is often so constructed as to tell the hour by the stroke of a hammer on a bell. It is not adapted, like the watch, to be carried on the person.

Clock (n.) A large beetle, esp. the European dung beetle (Scarabaeus stercorarius).

Clod (n.) That which is earthy and of little relative value, as the body of man in comparison with the soul.

Clod (v.i) To collect into clods, or into a thick mass; to coagulate; to clot; as, clodded gore. See Clot.

Clog (v. i.) To become clogged; to become loaded or encumbered, as with extraneous matter.

Clog (v. i.) To coalesce or adhere; to unite in a mass.

Cloisonne (a.) Inlaid between partitions: -- said of enamel when the lines which divide the different patches of fields are composed of a kind of metal wire secured to the ground; as distinguished from champleve enamel, in which the ground is engraved or scooped out to receive the enamel.

Cloister (v. t.) A covered passage or ambulatory on one side of a court;

Cloister (v. t.) the series of such passages on the different sides of any court, esp. that of a monastery or a college.

Cloister (v. t.) To confine in, or as in, a cloister; to seclude from the world; to immure.

Cloistral (a.) Of, pertaining to, or confined in, a cloister; recluse.

Clonic (a.) Having an irregular, convulsive motion.

Cloop (n.) The sound made when a cork is forcibly drawn from a bottle.

Close (n.) To bring together the parts of; to consolidate; as, to close the ranks of an army; -- often used with up.

Close (n.) To bring to an end or period; to conclude; to complete; to finish; to end; to consummate; as, to close a bargain; to close a course of instruction.

Close (n.) To come or gather around; to inclose; to encompass; to confine.

Close (v. i.) To come together; to unite or coalesce, as the parts of a wound, or parts separated.

Close (v. i.) To end, terminate, or come to a period; as, the debate closed at six o'clock.

Close (n.) The conclusion of a strain of music; cadence.

Close (v. t.) A narrow passage leading from a street to a court, and the houses within.

Close (v. t.) Narrow; confined; as, a close alley; close quarters.

Close (v. t.) Strictly confined; carefully quarded; as, a close prisoner.

Close (v. t.) Having the parts near each other; dense; solid; compact; as applied to bodies; viscous; tenacious; not volatile, as applied to liquids.

Close (v. t.) Intimate; familiar; confidential.

Close (v. t.) Uttered with a relatively contracted opening of the mouth, as certain sounds of e and o in French, Italian, and German; -- opposed to open.

Closemouthed (a.) Cautious in speaking; secret; wary; uncommunicative.

Closer (n.) The last stone in a horizontal course, if of a less size than the others, or a piece of brick finishing a course.

Close-stool (n.) A utensil to hold a chamber vessel, for the use of the sick and infirm. It is usually in the form of a box, with a seat and tight cover.

Closet (v. t.) To shut up in, or as in, a closet; to conceal.

Closure (v. t.) That which incloses or confines; an inclosure.

Closure (v. t.) A conclusion; an end.

Clot (n.) A concretion or coagulation; esp. a soft, slimy, coagulated mass, as of blood; a coagulum.

Clot (v. i.) To concrete, coagulate, or thicken, as soft or fluid matter by evaporation; to become a cot or clod.

Clote (n.) The common burdock; the clotbur.

Cloth (n.) A fabric made of fibrous material (or sometimes of wire, as in wire cloth); commonly, a woven fabric of cotton, woolen, or linen, adapted to be made into garments; specifically, woolen fabrics, as distinguished from all others.

Clothe (v. t.) To put garments on; to cover with clothing; to dress.

Clothe (v. t.) Fig.: To cover or invest, as with a garment; as, to clothe one with authority or power.

Clothes (n. pl.) Covering for the human body; dress; vestments; vesture; -- a general term for whatever covering is worn, or is made to be worn, for decency or comfort.

Clothes (n. pl.) The covering of a bed; bedclothes.

Clothing (n.) Garments in general; clothes; dress; raiment; covering.

Clothing (n.) A covering of non-conducting material on the outside of a boiler, or steam chamber, to prevent radiation of heat.

Clotter (v. i.) To concrete into lumps; to clot.

Cloud (n.) A collection of visible vapor, or watery particles, suspended in the upper atmosphere.

Cloud (n.) A great crowd or multitude; a vast collection.

Cloud (v. t.) To mark with, or darken in, veins or sports; to variegate with colors; as, to cloud yarn.

Cloud (v. i.) To grow cloudy; to become obscure with clouds; -- often used with up.

Cloudberry (n.) A species of raspberry (Rubus Chamaemerous) growing in the northern regions, and bearing edible, amber-colored fruit.

Cloud-burst (n.) A sudden copious rainfall, as the whole cloud had been precipitated at once.

Cloud-compeller (n.) Cloud-gatherer; -- an epithet applied to Zeus.

Clouding (n.) A diversity of colors in yarn, recurring at regular intervals.

Clout (n.) To cover with cloth, leather, or other material; to bandage; patch, or mend, with a clout.

Clover (n.) A plant of different species of the genus Trifolium; as the common red clover, T. pratense, the white, T. repens, and the hare's foot, T. arvense.

Clown (n.) A man of coarse nature and manners; an awkward fellow; an ill-bred person; a boor.

Clownishness (n.) The manners of a clown; coarseness or rudeness of behavior.

Club (n.) An association of persons for the promotion of some common object, as literature, science, politics, good fellowship, etc.; esp. an association supported by equal assessments or contributions of the members.

Club (n.) A joint charge of expense, or any person's share of it; a contribution to a common fund.

Club (v. t.) To throw, or allow to fall, into confusion.

Club (v. t.) To unite, or contribute, for the accomplishment of a common end; as, to club exertions.

Club (v. i.) To form a club; to combine for the promotion of some common object; to unite.

Club (v. i.) To pay on equal or proportionate share of a common charge or expense; to pay for something by contribution.

Clubfist (n.) A coarse, brutal fellow.

Clubfoot (n.) A short, variously distorted foot; also, the deformity, usually congenital, which such a foot exhibits; talipes.

Clump (n.) The compressed clay of coal strata.

Clumps (n.) A game in which questions are asked for the purpose of enabling the questioners to discover a word or thing previously selected by two persons who answer the questions; -- so called because the players take sides in two "clumps" or groups, the "clump" which guesses the word winning the game.

Clumsy (superl.) Stiff or benumbed, as with cold.

Cluster (n.) A number of similar things collected together or lying contiguous; a group; as, a cluster of islands.

Cluster (n.) A number of individuals grouped together or collected in one place; a crowd; a mob.

Cluster (v. t.) To collect into a cluster or clusters; to gather into a bunch or close body.

Clutch (n.) A device which is used for coupling shafting, etc., so as to transmit motion, and which may be disengaged at pleasure.

Clutch (n.) The nest complement of eggs of a bird.

Clutter (n.) A confused collection; hence, confusion; disorder; as, the room is in a clutter.

Clutter (n.) Clatter; confused noise.

Clutter (v. t.) To crowd together in disorder; to fill or cover with things in disorder; to throw into disorder; to disarrange; as, to clutter a room.

Clutter (v. i.) To make a confused noise; to bustle.

Clutter (n.) To clot or coagulate, as blood.

Cnidaria (n. pl.) A comprehensive group equivalent to the true Coelenterata, i. e., exclusive of the sponges. They are so named from presence of stinging cells (cnidae) in the tissues. See Coelenterata.

Co- () A form of the prefix com-, signifying with, together, in conjunction, joint. It is used before vowels and some consonants. See Com-.

Coacervate (a.) Raised into a pile; collected into a crowd; heaped.

Coach (v. t.) To convey in a coach.

Coach (v. i.) To drive or to ride in a coach; -- sometimes used with

Coachbox () The seat of a coachman.

Coachdog () One of a breed of dogs trained to accompany carriages; the Dalmatian dog.

Coachee (n.) A coachman

Coachfellow (n.) One of a pair of horses employed to draw a coach; hence (Fig.), a comrade.

Coachman (n.) A man whose business is to drive a coach or carriage.

Coachmanship (n.) Skill in driving a coach.

Coachwhip snake () A large, slender, harmless snake of the southern United States (Masticophis flagelliformis).

Coact (v. t.) To force; to compel; to drive.

Coact (v. i.) To act together; to work in concert; to unite.

Coaction (n.) Force; compulsion, either in restraining or impelling.

Coactive (a.) Serving to compel or constrain; compulsory; restrictive.

Coactive (a.) Acting in concurrence; united in action.

Coactively (adv.) In a coactive manner.

Coadapted (a.) Adapted one to another; as, coadapted pulp and tooth.

Coadjument (n.) Mutual help; cooperation.

Coadjutive (a.) Rendering mutual aid; coadjutant.

Coadjutor (n.) One who aids another; an assistant; a coworker.

Coadjutorship (n.) The state or office of a coadjutor; joint assistance.

Coadjutrix (n.) A female coadjutor or assistant.

Coadjuvancy (n.) Joint help; cooperation.

Coadunate (a.) United at the base, as contiguous lobes of a leaf.

Coafforest (v. t.) To convert into, or add to, a forest.

Coagency (n.) Agency in common; joint agency or agent.

Coagent (n.) An associate in an act; a coworker.

Coagulability (n.) The quality of being coagulable; capacity of being coagulated.

Coagulable (a.) Capable of being coagulated.

Coagulant (n.) That which produces coagulation.

Coagulate (v. t.) To cause (a liquid) to change into a curdlike or semisolid state, not by evaporation but by some kind of chemical reaction; to curdle; as, rennet coagulates milk; heat coagulates the white of an egg.

Coagulate (v. i.) To undergo coagulation.

Coagulated (a.) Changed into, or contained in, a coagulum or a curdlike mass; curdled.

Coagulation (n.) The change from a liquid to a thickened, curdlike, insoluble state, not by evaporation, but by some kind of chemical reaction; as, the spontaneous coagulation of freshly drawn blood; the coagulation of milk by rennet, or acid, and the coagulation of egg albumin by heat. Coagulation is generally the change of an albuminous body into an insoluble modification.

Coagulation (n.) The substance or body formed by coagulation.

Coagulative (a.) Having the power to cause coagulation; as, a coagulative agent.

Coagulator (n.) That which causes coagulation.

Coagulatory (a.) Serving to coagulate; produced by coagulation; as, coagulatory effects.

Coagulum (a.) The thick, curdy precipitate formed by the coagulation of albuminous matter; any mass of coagulated matter, as a clot of blood.

Coaita (n.) The native name of certain South American monkeys of the genus Ateles, esp. A. paniscus. The black-faced coaita is Ateles ater. See Illustration in Appendix.

Coak (n.) A kind of tenon connecting the face of a scarfed timber with the face of another timber, or a dowel or pin of hard wood or iron uniting timbers.

Coal (n.) A thoroughly charred, and extinguished or still ignited, fragment from wood or other combustible substance; charcoal.

Coal (n.) A black, or brownish black, solid, combustible substance, dug from beds or veins in the earth to be used for fuel, and consisting, like charcoal, mainly of carbon, but more compact, and often affording, when heated, a large amount of volatile matter.

Coal (v. t.) To burn to charcoal; to char.

Coal (v. t.) To mark or delineate with charcoal.

Coal (v. t.) To supply with coal; as, to coal a steamer.

Coal (v. i.) To take in coal; as, the steamer coaled at Southampton.

Coal-black (a.) As black as coal; jet black; very black.

Coalesce (n.) To grow together; to unite by growth into one body; as, the parts separated by a wound coalesce.

Coalesce (n.) To unite in one body or product; to combine into one body or community; as, vapors coalesce.

Coalescence (n.) The act or state of growing together, as similar parts; the act of uniting by natural affinity or attraction; the state of being united; union; concretion.

Coalescent (a.) Growing together; cohering, as in the organic cohesion of similar parts; uniting.

Coalfish (n.) The pollock; -- called also, coalsey, colemie, colmey, coal whiting, etc. See Pollock.

Coalfish (n.) The cobia.

Coalgoose (n.) The cormorant; -- so called from its black color.

Coalite (v. i.) To unite or coalesce.

Coalite (v. t.) To cause to unite or coalesce.

Coalition (n.) The act of coalescing; union into a body or mass, as of separate bodies or parts; as, a coalition of atoms.

Coalition (n.) A combination, for temporary purposes, of persons, parties, or states, having different interests.

Coalitioner (n.) A coalitionist.

Coalitionist (n.) One who joins or promotes a coalition; one who advocates coalition.

Coal-meter (n.) A licensed or official coal measurer in London. See Meter.

Coalmouse (n.) A small species of titmouse, with a black head; the coletit.

Coalpit (n.) A pit where coal is dug.

Coalpit (n.) A place where charcoal is made.

Coal tar () A thick, black, tarry liquid, obtained by the distillation of bituminous coal in the manufacture of illuminating gas; used for making printer's ink, black varnish, etc. It is a complex mixture from which many substances have been obtained, especially hydrocarbons of the benzene or aromatic series.

Coal-whipper (n.) One who raises coal out of the hold of a ship.

Coal works () A place where coal is dug, including the machinery for raising the coal.

Coaly (n.) Pertaining to, or resembling, coal; containing coal; of the nature of coal.

Coarctate (a.) To press together; to crowd; to straiten; to confine closely.

Coarctate (a.) To restrain; to confine.

Coarctate (a.) Pressed together; closely connected; -- applied to insects having the abdomen separated from the thorax only by a constriction.

Coarse (superl.) Large in bulk, or composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture; gross; thick; rough; -- opposed to fine; as, coarse sand; coarse thread; coarse cloth; coarse bread.

Coarse (superl.) Not refined; rough; rude; unpolished; gross; indelicate; as, coarse manners; coarse language.

Coarse-grained (a.) Having a coarse grain or texture, as wood; hence, wanting in refinement.

Coarsely (adv.) In a coarse manner; roughly; rudely; inelegantly; uncivilly; meanly.

Coarsen (v. t.) To make coarse or vulgar; as, to coarsen one's character.

Coarseness (n.) The quality or state of being coarse; roughness; inelegance; vulgarity; grossness; as, coarseness of food, texture, manners, or language.

Coast (v. t.) The exterior line, limit, or border of a country; frontier border.

Coast (n.) To sail from port to port in the same country.

Coast (v. t.) To sail by or near; to follow the coast line of.

Coast (v. t.) To conduct along a coast or river bank.

Coastal (a.) Of or pertaining to a coast.

Coaster (n.) A vessel employed in sailing along a coast, or engaged in the coasting trade.

Coasting (a.) Sailing along or near a coast, or running between ports along a coast.

Coasting (n.) A sailing along a coast, or from port to port; a carrying on a coasting trade.

Coastways (adv.) By way of, or along, the coast.

Coat (n.) A petticoat.

Coat (n.) An external covering like a garment, as fur, skin, wool, husk, or bark; as, the horses coats were sleek.

Coat (n.) A layer of any substance covering another; a cover; a tegument; as, the coats of the eye; the coats of an onion; a coat of tar or varnish.

Coat (n.) A coat card. See below.

Coat (v. t.) To cover with a coat or outer garment.

Coat (v. t.) To cover with a layer of any substance; as, to coat a jar with tin foil; to coat a ceiling.

Coatee (n.) A coat with short flaps.

Coati (n.) A mammal of tropical America of the genus Nasua, allied to the raccoon, but with a longer body, tail, and nose.

Coating (n.) A coat or covering; a layer of any substance, as a cover or protection; as, the coating of a retort or vial.

Coating (n.) Cloth for coats; as, an assortment of coatings.

Coatless (a.) Not wearing a coat; also, not possessing a coat.

Coax (v. t.) To persuade by gentle, insinuating courtesy, flattering, or fondling; to wheedle; to soothe.

Coaxer (n.) One who coaxes.

Coaxingly (adv.) In a coaxing manner; by coaxing.

Cob (n.) A leader or chief; a conspicuous person, esp. a rich covetous person.

Cob (n.) The axis on which the kernels of maize or indian corn grow.

Cob (n.) A lump or piece of anything, usually of a somewhat large size, as of coal, or stone.

Cob (n.) A cobnut; as, Kentish cobs. See Cobnut.

Cob (n.) A punishment consisting of blows inflicted on the buttocks with a strap or a flat piece of wood.

Cob (n.) A Spanish coin formerly current in Ireland, worth abiut 4s. 6d.

Cobaea (n.) A genus of climbing plants, native of Mexico and South America. C. scandens is a conservatory climber with large bell-shaped flowers.

Cobalt (n.) A commercial name of a crude arsenic used as fly poison.

Cobaltic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, cobalt; -- said especially of those compounds in which cobalt has higher valence; as, cobaltic oxide.

Cobaltiferous (a.) Containing cobalt.

Cobaltite (n.) A mineral of a nearly silver-white color, composed of arsenic, sulphur, and cobalt.

Cobaltous (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, cobalt; -- said esp. of cobalt compounds in which the metal has its lower valence.

Cobble (n.) A cobblestone.

Cobble (n.) Cob coal. See under Cob.

Cobble (v. t.) To make or mend coarsely; to patch; to botch; as, to cobble shoes.

Cobble (v. t.) To pave with cobblestones.

Cobbler (n.) A beverage. See Sherry cobbler, under Sherry.

Cobelligerent (a.) Carrying on war in conjunction with another power.

Cobelligerent (n.) A nation or state that carries on war in connection with another.

Cobia (n.) An oceanic fish of large size (Elacate canada); the crabeater; -- called also bonito, cubbyyew, coalfish, and sergeant fish.

Cobishop (n.) A joint or coadjutant bishop.

Coble (n.) A flat-floored fishing boat with a lug sail, and a drop rudder extending from two to four feet below the keel. It was originally used on the stormy coast of Yorkshire, England.

Cobra (n.) The cobra de capello.

Cobwebbed (a.) Abounding in cobwebs.

Cobwebby (a.) Abounding in cobwebs, or any fine web; resembling a cobweb.

Cobwork (a.) Built of logs, etc., laid horizontally, with the ends dovetailed together at the corners, as in a log house; in marine work, often surrounding a central space filled with stones; as, a cobwork dock or breakwater.

Cocagne (n.) An imaginary country of idleness and luxury.

Cocagne (n.) The land of cockneys; cockneydom; -- a term applied to London and its suburbs.

Cocaine (n.) A powerful alkaloid, C17H21NO4, obtained from the leaves of coca. It is a bitter, white, crystalline substance, and is remarkable for producing local insensibility to pain.

Cocciferous (a.) Bearing or producing berries; bacciferous; as, cocciferous trees or plants.

Coccobacteria (pl. ) of Coccobacterium

Coccobacterium (n.) One of the round variety of bacteria, a vegetable organism, generally less than a thousandth of a millimeter in diameter.

Coccolite (n.) A granular variety of pyroxene, green or white in color.

Coccolith (n.) One of a kind of minute, calcareous bodies, probably vegetable, often abundant in deep-sea mud.

Coccosphere (n.) A small, rounded, marine organism, capable of braking up into coccoliths.

Coccosteus (n.) An extinct genus of Devonian ganoid fishes, having the broad plates about the head studded with berrylike tubercles.

Cocculus Indicus (n.) The fruit or berry of the Anamirta Cocculus, a climbing plant of the East Indies. It is a poisonous narcotic and stimulant.

Coccus (n.) A genus of hemipterous insects, including scale insects, and the cochineal insect (Coccus cacti).

Coccygeal (a.) Of or pertaining to the coccyx; as, the coccygeal vertebrae.

Coccyx (n.) The end of the vertebral column beyond the sacrum in man and tailless monkeys. It is composed of several vertebrae more or less consolidated.

Cochineal () A dyestuff consisting of the dried bodies of females of the Coccus cacti, an insect native in Mexico, Central America, etc., and found on several species of cactus, esp. Opuntia cochinellifera.

Cochineal fig () A plant of Central and Southern America, of the Cactus family, extensively cultivated for the sake of the cochineal insect, which lives on it.

Cochlea (n.) An appendage of the labyrinth of the internal ear, which is elongated and coiled into a spiral in mammals. See Ear.

Cochlear (a.) Of or pertaining to the cochlea.

Cock (n.) A vane in the shape of a cock; a weathercock.

Cock (n.) The crow of a cock, esp. the first crow in the morning; cockcrow.

Cock (n.) The act of cocking; also, the turn so given; as, a cock of the eyes; to give a hat a saucy cock.

Cock (n.) A small concial pile of hay.

Cock (v. t.) To put into cocks or heaps, as hay.

Cock (n.) A corruption or disguise of the word God, used in oaths.

Cockaded (a.) Wearing a cockade.

Cockaleekie (n.) A favorite soup in Scotland, made from a capon highly seasoned, and boiled with leeks and prunes.

Cockatoo (n.) A bird of the Parrot family, of the subfamily Cacatuinae, having a short, strong, and much curved beak, and the head ornamented with a crest, which can be raised or depressed at will. There are several genera and many species; as the broad-crested (Plictolophus, / Cacatua, cristatus), the sulphur-crested (P. galeritus), etc. The palm or great black cockatoo of Australia is Microglossus aterrimus.

Cockbill (v. t.) To tilt up one end of so as to make almost vertical; as, to cockbill the yards as a sign of mourning.

Cockcrowing (n.) The time at which cocks first crow; the early morning.

Cocker (n.) One given to cockfighting.

Cocker (n.) A small dog of the spaniel kind, used for starting up woodcocks, etc.

Cockerel (n.) A young cock.

Cockeye (n.) The socket in the ball of a millstone, which sits on the cockhead.

Cockfight (n.) A match or contest of gamecocks.

Cockfighting (n.) The act or practice of pitting gamecocks to fight.

Cockfighting (a.) Addicted to cockfighting.

Cockle (n.) A cockleshell.

Cockle (v. t.) To cause to contract into wrinkles or ridges, as some kinds of cloth after a wetting.

Cockle (n.) A plant or weed that grows among grain; the corn rose (Luchnis Githage).

Cocklebur (n.) A coarse, composite weed, having a rough or prickly fruit; one of several species of the genus Xanthium; -- called also clotbur.

Cockler (n.) One who takes and sells cockles.

Cockleshell (n.) One of the shells or valves of a cockle.

Cockmaster (n.) One who breeds gamecocks.

Cockmatch (n.) A cockfight.

Cockney (n.) A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Cockney (a.) Of or relating to, or like, cockneys.

Cockneydom (n.) The region or home of cockneys; cockneys, collectively.

Cockneyfy (v. t.) To form with the manners or character of a cockney.

Cockneyish (a.) Characteristic of, or resembling, cockneys.

Cockneyism (n.) The characteristics, manners, or dialect, of a cockney.

Cockpit (n.) A pit, or inclosed area, for cockfights.

Cockpit (n.) The Privy Council room at Westminster; -- so called because built on the site of the cockpit of Whitehall palace.

Cockscomb (n.) See Coxcomb.

Cockscomb (n.) A plant (Celosia cristata), of many varieties, cultivated for its broad, fantastic spikes of brilliant flowers; -- sometimes called garden cockscomb. Also the Pedicularis, or lousewort, the Rhinanthus Crista-galli, and the Onobrychis Crista-galli.

Cockshut (n.) A kind of net to catch woodcock.

Cockshy (n.) A game in which trinkets are set upon sticks, to be thrown at by the players; -- so called from an ancient popular sport which consisted in "shying" or throwing cudgels at live cocks.

Cocktail (n.) A mean, half-hearted fellow; a coward.

Coco () Alt. of Coco palm

Coco palm () See Cocoa.

Cocoa () Alt. of Cocoa palm

Cocoa palm () A palm tree producing the cocoanut (Cocos nucifera). It grows in nearly all tropical countries, attaining a height of sixty or eighty feet. The trunk is without branches, and has a tuft of leaves at the top, each being fifteen or twenty feet in length, and at the base of these the nuts hang in clusters; the cocoanut tree.

Cocoa (n.) A preparation made from the seeds of the chocolate tree, and used in making, a beverage; also the beverage made from cocoa or cocoa shells.

Cocoanut (n.) The large, hard-shelled nut of the cocoa palm. It yields an agreeable milky liquid and a white meat or albumen much used as food and in making oil.

Cocobolo (n.) Alt. of Cocobolas

Cocobolas (n.) A very beautiful and hard wood, obtained in the West India Islands. It is used in cabinetmaking, for the handles of tools, and for various fancy articles.

Cocoon (n.) An oblong case in which the silkworm lies in its chrysalis state. It is formed of threads of silk spun by the worm just before leaving the larval state. From these the silk of commerce is prepared.

Cocoon (n.) The case constructed by any insect to contain its larva or pupa.

Cocoon (n.) The case of silk made by spiders to protect their eggs.

Cocoon (n.) The egg cases of mucus, etc., made by leeches and other worms.

Cocoonery (n.) A building or apartment for silkworms, when feeding and forming cocoons.

Coctible (a.) Capable of being cooked.

Cod (n.) A husk; a pod; as, a peascod.

Cod (n.) An important edible fish (Gadus morrhua), taken in immense numbers on the northern coasts of Europe and America. It is especially abundant and large on the Grand Bank of Newfoundland. It is salted and dried in large quantities.

Coda (n.) A few measures added beyond the natural termination of a composition.

Codder (n.) A gatherer of cods or peas.

Code (n.) A body of law, sanctioned by legislation, in which the rules of law to be specifically applied by the courts are set forth in systematic form; a compilation of laws by public authority; a digest.

Code (n.) Any system of rules or regulations relating to one subject; as, the medical code, a system of rules for the regulation of the professional conduct of physicians; the naval code, a system of rules for making communications at sea means of signals.

Codeine (n.) One of the opium alkaloids; a white crystalline substance, C18H21NO3, similar to and regarded as a derivative of morphine, but much feebler in its action; -- called also codeia.

Codetta (n.) A short passage connecting two sections, but not forming part of either; a short coda.

Codex (n.) A collection or digest of laws; a code.

Codex (n.) A collection of canons.

Codical (a.) Relating to a codex, or a code.

Codicillary (a.) Of the nature of a codicil.

Codification (n.) The act or process of codifying or reducing laws to a code.

Codifier (n.) One who codifies.

Codify (v. t.) To reduce to a code, as laws.

Codilla (n.) The coarse tow of flax and hemp.

Codist (n.) A codifier; a maker of codes.

Codling (n.) An apple fit to stew or coddle.

Codling (n.) A young cod; also, a hake.

Cod liver (n.) The liver of the common cod and allied species.

Codpiece (n.) A part of male dress in front of the breeches, formerly made very conspicuous.

Coefficiency (n.) Joint efficiency; cooperation.

Coefficient (n.) A number or letter put before a letter or quantity, known or unknown, to show how many times the latter is to be taken; as, 6x; bx; here 6 and b are coefficients of x.

Coefficient (n.) A number, commonly used in computation as a factor, expressing the amount of some change or effect under certain fixed conditions as to temperature, length, volume, etc.; as, the coefficient of expansion; the coefficient of friction.

Coelenterata (n. pl.) A comprehensive group of Invertebrata, mostly marine, comprising the Anthozoa, Hydrozoa, and Ctenophora. The name implies that the stomach and body cavities are one. The group is sometimes enlarged so as to include the sponges.

Coelospermous (a.) Hollow-seeded; having the ventral face of the seedlike carpels incurved at the ends, as in coriander seed.

Coemption (n.) The act of buying the whole quantity of any commodity.

Coendoo (n.) The Brazilian porcupine (Cercolades, / Sphingurus, prehensiles), remarkable for its prehensile tail.

Coenenchyma (n.) The common tissue which unites the polyps or zooids of a compound anthozoan or coral. It may be soft or more or less ossified. See Coral.

Coenoecium (n.) The common tissue which unites the various zooids of a bryozoan.

Coenogamy (n.) The state of a community which permits promiscuous sexual intercourse among its members; -- as in certain primitive tribes or communistic societies.

Coenosarc (n.) The common soft tissue which unites the polyps of a compound hydroid. See Hydroidea.

Coenurus (n.) The larval stage of a tapeworm (Taenia coenurus) which forms bladderlike sacs in the brain of sheep, causing the fatal disease known as water brain, vertigo, staggers or gid.

Coequally (adv.) With coequality.

Coerce (v. t.) To compel or constrain to any action; as, to coerce a man to vote for a certain candidate.

Coerce (v. t.) To compel or enforce; as, to coerce obedience.

Coercible (a.) Capable of being coerced.

Coercion (n.) The act or process of coercing.

Coercion (n.) The application to another of either physical or moral force. When the force is physical, and cannot be resisted, then the act produced by it is a nullity, so far as concerns the party coerced. When the force is moral, then the act, though voidable, is imputable to the party doing it, unless he be so paralyzed by terror as to act convulsively. At the same time coercion is not negatived by the fact of submission under force. "Coactus volui" (I consented under compulsion) is the condition of mind which, when there is volition forced by coercion, annuls the result of such coercion.

Coercive (a.) Serving or intended to coerce; having power to constrain.

Coerulignone (n.) A bluish violet, crystalline substance obtained in the purification of crude wood vinegar. It is regarded as a complex quinone derivative of diphenyl; -- called also cedriret.

Coetanean (n.) A person coetaneous with another; a contemporary.

Coetaneous (a.) Of the same age; beginning to exist at the same time; contemporaneous.

Coeval (n.) One of the same age; a contemporary.

Coexistence (n.) Existence at the same time with another; -- contemporary existence.

Coexistent (n.) That which coexists with another.

Coextensive (a.) Equally extensive; having equal extent; as, consciousness and knowledge are coextensive.

Coffee (n.) The coffee tree.

Coffeehouse (n.) A house of entertainment, where guests are supplied with coffee and other refreshments, and where men meet for conversation.

Coffeeman (n.) One who keeps a coffeehouse.

Coffeepot (n.) A covered pot in which coffee is prepared, or is brought upon the table for drinking.

Coffeeroom (n.) A public room where coffee and other refreshments may be obtained.

Coffer (n.) A panel deeply recessed in the ceiling of a vault, dome, or portico; a caisson.

Coffer (n.) The chamber of a canal lock; also, a caisson or a cofferdam.

Coffer (v. t.) To put into a coffer.

Coffer (v. t.) To form with or in a coffer or coffers; to furnish with a coffer or coffers.

Cofferer (n.) One who keeps treasures in a coffer.

Coffin (n.) A conical paper bag, used by grocers.

Coffin (n.) The hollow crust or hoof of a horse's foot, below the coronet, in which is the coffin bone.

Coffin (v. t.) To inclose in, or as in, a coffin.

Coffinless (a.) Having no coffin.

Cog (v. t.) To seduce, or draw away, by adulation, artifice, or falsehood; to wheedle; to cozen; to cheat.

Cog (v. t.) To obtrude or thrust in, by falsehood or deception; as, to cog in a word; to palm off.

Cog (n.) A tenon in a scarf joint; a coak.

Cog (n.) One of the rough pillars of stone or coal left to support the roof of a mine.

Cog (v. t.) To furnish with a cog or cogs.

Cogency (n.) The quality of being cogent; power of compelling conviction; conclusiveness; force.

Cogent (p. a.) Having the power to compel conviction or move the will; constraining; conclusive; forcible; powerful; not easily reasisted.

Cogently (adv.) In a cogent manner; forcibly; convincingly; conclusively.

Coggle (n.) A cobblestone.

Cogitability (n.) The quality of being cogitable; conceivableness.

Cogitable (a.) Capable of being brought before the mind as a thought or idea; conceivable; thinkable.

Cogitate (v. i.) To engage in continuous thought; to think.

Cogitation (n.) The act of thinking; thought; meditation; contemplation.

Cogitative (a.) Given to thought or contemplation.

Cogman (n.) A dealer in cogware or coarse cloth.

Cognate (a.) Of the same or a similar nature; of the same family; proceeding from the same stock or root; allied; kindred; as, a cognate language.

Cognate (n.) One of a number of things allied in origin or nature; as, certain letters are cognates.

Cognateness (n.) The state of being cognate.

Cognation (n.) That tie of consanguinity which exists between persons descended from the same mother; -- used in distinction from agnation.

Cognatus (n.) A person connected through cognation.

Cognitive (a.) Knowing, or apprehending by the understanding; as, cognitive power.

Cognizable (a.) Capable of being known or apprehended; as, cognizable causes.

Cognizably (adv.) In a cognizable manner.

Cognizance (n.) Recollection; recognition.

Cognizance (n.) Jurisdiction, or the power given by law to hear and decide controversies.

Cognizance (n.) An acknowledgment of a fine of lands and tenements or confession of a thing done.

Cognizant (a.) Having cognizance or knowledge. (of).

Cognize (v. t.) To know or perceive; to recognize.

Cognizor (n.) One who acknowledged the right of the plaintiff or cognizee in a fine; the defendant.

Cognominal (a.) Of or pertaining to a cognomen; of the nature of a surname.

Cognomination (n.) A cognomen or surname.

Cognoscente (n.) A connoisseur.

Cognoscibility (n.) The quality of being cognoscible.

Cogware (n.) A coarse, narrow cloth, like frieze, used by the lower classes in the sixteenth century.

Cogwheel (n.) A wheel with cogs or teeth; a gear wheel. See Illust. of Gearing.

Cohabit (v.) To inhabit or reside in company, or in the same place or country.

Cohabitant (n.) One who dwells with another, or in the same place or country.

Cohabiter (n.) A cohabitant.

Coheirship (n.) The state of being a coheir.

Cohere (a.) To be united or connected together in subordination to one purpose; to follow naturally and logically, as the parts of a discourse, or as arguments in a train of reasoning; to be logically consistent.

Coherency (n.) A sticking or cleaving together; union of parts of the same body; cohesion.

Coherency (n.) Connection or dependence, proceeding from the subordination of the parts of a thing to one principle or purpose, as in the parts of a discourse, or of a system of philosophy; consecutiveness.

Coherent (a.) Composed of mutually dependent parts; making a logical whole; consistent; as, a coherent plan, argument, or discourse.

Coherent (a.) Logically consistent; -- applied to persons; as, a coherent thinker.

Coherent (a.) Suitable or suited; adapted; accordant.

Coherently (adv.) In a coherent manner.

Cohesibility (n.) The state of being cohesible.

Cohesible (a.) Capable of cohesion.

Cohesion (n.) Logical agreement and dependence; as, the cohesion of ideas.

Cohesive (a.) Holding the particles of a homogeneous body together; as, cohesive attraction; producing cohesion; as, a cohesive force.

Cohesive (a.) Cohering, or sticking together, as in a mass; capable of cohering; tending to cohere; as, cohesive clay.

Cohobation (n.) The process of cohobating.

Cohort (n.) A natural group of orders of plants, less comprehensive than a class.

Coif (n.) A close-fitting cap covering the sides of the head, like a small hood without a cape.

Coif (v. t.) To cover or dress with, or as with, a coif.

Coifed (a.) Wearing a coif.

Coil (v. t.) To wind cylindrically or spirally; as, to coil a rope when not in use; the snake coiled itself before springing.

Coil (v. t.) To encircle and hold with, or as with, coils.

Coil (v. i.) To wind itself cylindrically or spirally; to form a coil; to wind; -- often with about or around.

Coil (n.) A series of connected pipes in rows or layers, as in a steam heating apparatus.

Coil (n.) A noise, tumult, bustle, or confusion.

Coin (n.) A quoin; a corner or external angle; a wedge. See Coigne, and Quoin.

Coin (n.) A piece of metal on which certain characters are stamped by government authority, making it legally current as money; -- much used in a collective sense.

Coin (n.) That which serves for payment or recompense.

Coin (v. t.) To make of a definite fineness, and convert into coins, as a mass of metal; to mint; to manufacture; as, to coin silver dollars; to coin a medal.

Coin (v. t.) To make or fabricate; to invent; to originate; as, to coin a word.

Coin (v. i.) To manufacture counterfeit money.

Coinage (v. t.) The act or process of converting metal into money.

Coinage (v. t.) Coins; the aggregate coin of a time or place.

Coinage (v. t.) The cost or expense of coining money.

Coincide (n.) To occur at the same time; to be contemporaneous; as, the fall of Granada coincided with the discovery of America.

Coincide (n.) To correspond exactly; to agree; to concur; as, our aims coincide.

Coincidence (n.) The condition of occupying the same place in space; as, the coincidence of circles, surfaces, etc.

Coincidence (n.) The condition or fact of happening at the same time; as, the coincidence of the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

Coincidence (n.) Exact correspondence in nature, character, result, circumstances, etc.; concurrence; agreement.

Coincident (a.) Having coincidence; occupying the same place; contemporaneous; concurrent; -- followed by with.

Coincident (n.) One of two or more coincident events; a coincidence.

Coincidently (adv.) With coincidence.

Coincider (n.) One who coincides with another in an opinion.

Coindication (n.) One of several signs or symptoms indicating the same fact; as, a coindication of disease.

Coiner (n.) One who makes or stamps coin; a maker of money; -- usually, a maker of counterfeit money.

Coinheritor (n.) A coheir.

Coinitial (a.) Having a common beginning.

Cointense (a.) Equal in intensity or degree; as, the relations between 6 and 12, and 8 and 16, are cointense.

Cointension (n.) The condition of being of equal in intensity; -- applied to relations; as, 3:6 and 6:12 are relations of cointension.

Coir (n.) A material for cordage, matting, etc., consisting of the prepared fiber of the outer husk of the cocoanut.

Coistril (n.) A mean, paltry fellow; a coward.

Coition (n.) A coming together; sexual intercourse; copulation.

Cojoin (v. t.) To join; to conjoin.

Coke (n.) Mineral coal charred, or depriver of its bitumen, sulphur, or other volatile matter by roasting in a kiln or oven, or by distillation, as in gas works. It is lagerly used where / smokeless fire is required.

Coke (v. t.) To convert into coke.

Cokenay (n.) A cockney.

Cokernut (n.) The cocoanut.

Col (n.) A short ridge connecting two higher elevations or mountains; the pass over such a ridge.

Colatitude (n.) The complement of the latitude, or the difference between any latitude and ninety degrees.

Colchicine (n.) A powerful vegetable alkaloid, C17H19NO5, extracted from the Colchicum autumnale, or meadow saffron, as a white or yellowish amorphous powder, with a harsh, bitter taste; -- called also colchicia.

Colcothar (n.) Polishing rouge; a reddish brown oxide of iron, used in polishing glass, and also as a pigment; -- called also crocus Martis.

Cold (n.) Lacking the sensation of warmth; suffering from the absence of heat; chilly; shivering; as, to be cold.

Cold (n.) Wanting in ardor, intensity, warmth, zeal, or passion; spiritless; unconcerned; reserved.

Cold (n.) Unwelcome; disagreeable; unsatisfactory.

Cold (n.) Affecting the sense of smell (as of hunting dogs) but feebly; having lost its odor; as, a cold scent.

Cold (n.) Distant; -- said, in the game of hunting for some object, of a seeker remote from the thing concealed.

Cold (n.) A morbid state of the animal system produced by exposure to cold or dampness; a catarrh.

Cold (v. i.) To become cold.

Cold-blooded (a.) Having cold blood; -- said of fish or animals whose blood is but little warmer than the water or air about them.

Cold-blooded (a.) Not thoroughbred; -- said of animals, as horses, which are derived from the common stock of a country.

Coldish (a.) Somewhat cold; cool; chilly.

Coldly (adv.) In a cold manner; without warmth, animation, or feeling; with indifference; calmly.

Coldness (n.) The state or quality of being cold.

Cold-short (a.) Brittle when cold; as, cold-short iron.

Cold-shut (a.) Closed while too cold to become thoroughly welded; -- said of a forging or casting.

Cole (n.) A plant of the Brassica or Cabbage genus; esp. that form of B. oleracea called rape and coleseed.

Colemanite (n.) A hydrous borate of lime occurring in transparent colorless or white crystals, also massive, in Southern California.

Coleoptera (n. pl.) An order of insects having the anterior pair of wings (elytra) hard and horny, and serving as coverings for the posterior pair, which are membranous, and folded transversely under the others when not in use. The mouth parts form two pairs of jaws (mandibles and maxillae) adapted for chewing. Most of the Coleoptera are known as beetles and weevils.

Coleopterous (a.) Having wings covered with a case or sheath; belonging to the Coleoptera.

Coleseed (n.) The common rape or cole.

Collet () An inferior church servant. [Obs.] See Acolyte.

Coaltit (n.) A small European titmouse (Parus ater), so named from its black color; -- called also coalmouse and colemouse.

Coleus (n.) A plant of several species of the Mint family, cultivated for its bright-colored or variegated leaves.

Colewort (n.) A variety of cabbage in which the leaves never form a compact head.

Colewort (n.) Any white cabbage before the head has become firm.

Colic (a.) Of or pertaining to colic; affecting the bowels.

Colic (a.) Of or pertaining to the colon; as, the colic arteries.

Colical (a.) Of, pertaining to, or of the nature of, colic.

Colicky (a.) Pertaining to, or troubled with, colic; as, a colicky disorder.

Colicroot (n.) A bitter American herb of the Bloodwort family, with the leaves all radical, and the small yellow or white flowers in a long spike (Aletris farinosa and A. aurea). Called sometimes star grass, blackroot, blazing star, and unicorn root.

Colitis (n.) An inflammation of the large intestine, esp. of its mucous membrane; colonitis.

Collagen (n.) The chemical basis of ordinary connective tissue, as of tendons or sinews and of bone. On being boiled in water it becomes gelatin or glue.

Collagenous (a.) Containing or resembling collagen.

Collapse (v. i.) To fall together suddenly, as the sides of a hollow vessel; to close by falling or shrinking together; to have the sides or parts of (a thing) fall in together, or be crushed in together; as, a flue in the boiler of a steam engine sometimes collapses.

Collapse (v. i.) To fail suddenly and completely, like something hollow when subject to too much pressure; to undergo a collapse; as, Maximilian's government collapsed soon after the French army left Mexico; many financial projects collapse after attaining some success and importance.

Collapse (n.) A sudden and complete failure; an utter failure of any kind; a breakdown.

Collar (n.) Something worn round the neck, whether for use, ornament, restraint, or identification; as, the collar of a coat; a lady's collar; the collar of a dog.

Collar (n.) A collar beam.

Collar (n.) A ringlike part of a mollusk in connection with esophagus.

Collar (n.) A colored ring round the neck of a bird or mammal.

Collar (n.) A ring or round flange upon, surrounding, or against an object, and used for restraining motion within given limits, or for holding something to its place, or for hiding an opening around an object; as, a collar on a shaft, used to prevent endwise motion of the shaft; a collar surrounding a stovepipe at the place where it enters a wall. The flanges of a piston and the gland of a stuffing box are sometimes called collars.

Collar (v. t.) To seize by the collar.

Collar (v. t.) To put a collar on.

Collards (n. pl.) Young cabbage, used as "greens"; esp. a kind cultivated for that purpose; colewort.

Collared (a.) Wearing a collar.

Collared (a.) Wearing a collar; -- said of a man or beast used as a bearing when a collar is represented as worn around the neck or loins.

Collared (a.) Rolled up and bound close with a string; as, collared beef. See To collar beef, under Collar, v. t.

Collatable (a.) Capable of being collated.

Collate (v. t.) To compare critically, as books or manuscripts, in order to note the points of agreement or disagreement.

Collate (v. t.) To bestow or confer.

Collateral (a.) Coming from, being on, or directed toward, the side; as, collateral pressure.

Collateral (a.) Related to, but not strictly a part of, the main thing or matter under consideration; hence, subordinate; not chief or principal; as, collateral interest; collateral issues.

Collateral (a.) Tending toward the same conclusion or result as something else; additional; as, collateral evidence.

Collateral (n.) A collateral relative.

Collateral (n.) Collateral security; that which is pledged or deposited as collateral security.

Collaterally (adv.) In collateral relation; not lineally.

Collateralness (n.) The state of being collateral.

Collation (v. t.) The act of collating or comparing; a comparison of one copy er thing (as of a book, or manuscript) with another of a like kind; comparison, in general.

Collation (v. t.) The act of conferring or bestowing.

Collation (v. t.) A conference.

Collation (v. t.) The act of comparing the copy of any paper with its original to ascertain its conformity.

Collation (v. t.) A collection of the Lives of the Fathers or other devout work read daily in monasteries.

Collation (v. t.) A light repast or luncheon; as, a cold collation; -- first applied to the refreshment on fast days that accompanied the reading of the collation in monasteries.

Collation (v. i.) To partake of a collation.

Collationer (n.) One who examines the sheets of a book that has just been printed, to ascertain whether they are correctly printed, paged, etc.

Collatitious (a.) Brought together; contributed; done by contributions.

Collative (a.) Passing or held by collation; -- said of livings of which the bishop and the patron are the same person.

Collator (n.) One who collates manuscripts, books, etc.

Collator (n.) One who collates to a benefice.

Collator (n.) One who confers any benefit.

Collect (v. t.) To demand and obtain payment of, as an account, or other indebtedness; as, to collect taxes.

Collect (v. t.) To infer from observed facts; to conclude from premises.

Collect (v. i.) To assemble together; as, the people collected in a crowd; to accumulate; as, snow collects in banks.

Collect (v. i.) To infer; to conclude.

Collect (v. t.) A short, comprehensive prayer, adapted to a particular day, occasion, or condition, and forming part of a liturgy.

Collected (a.) Self-possessed; calm; composed.

Collectedly (adv.) Composedly; coolly.

Collectedness (n.) A collected state of the mind; self-possession.

Collectible (a.) Capable of being collected.

Collection (n.) The act or process of collecting or of gathering; as, the collection of specimens.

Collection (n.) That which is collected

Collection (n.) A gathering of money for charitable or other purposes, as by passing a contribution box for freewill offerings.

Collection (n.) The act of inferring or concluding from premises or observed facts; also, that which is inferred.

Collection (n.) The jurisdiction of a collector of excise.

Collectional (a.) Of or pertaining to collecting.

Collective (a.) Formed by gathering or collecting; gathered into a mass, sum, or body; congregated or aggregated; as, the collective body of a nation.

Collective (a.) Deducing consequences; reasoning; inferring.

Collective (a.) Expressing a collection or aggregate of individuals, by a singular form; as, a collective name or noun, like assembly, army, jury, etc.

Collective (a.) Tending to collect; forming a collection.

Collective (a.) Having plurality of origin or authority; as, in diplomacy, a note signed by the representatives of several governments is called a collective note.

Collective (n.) A collective noun or name.

Collectively (adv.) In a mass, or body; in a collected state; in the aggregate; unitedly.

Collectivism (n.) The doctrine that land and capital should be owned by society collectively or as a whole; communism.

Collectivist (n.) An advocate of collectivism.

Collectivist (a.) Relating to, or characteristic of, collectivism.

Collector (n.) One who collects things which are separate; esp., one who makes a business or practice of collecting works of art, objects in natural history, etc.; as, a collector of coins.

Collector (n.) A compiler of books; one who collects scattered passages and puts them together in one book.

Collector (n.) An officer appointed and commissioned to collect and receive customs, duties, taxes, or toll.

Collector (n.) One authorized to collect debts.

Collectorate (n.) The district of a collector of customs; a collectorship.

Collectorship (n.) The office of a collector of customs or of taxes.

College (n.) A collection, body, or society of persons engaged in common pursuits, or having common duties and interests, and sometimes, by charter, peculiar rights and privileges; as, a college of heralds; a college of electors; a college of bishops.

College (n.) A society of scholars or friends of learning, incorporated for study or instruction, esp. in the higher branches of knowledge; as, the colleges of Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and many American colleges.

College (n.) A building, or number of buildings, used by a college.

College (n.) Fig.: A community.

Collegian (n.) A member of a college, particularly of a literary institution so called; a student in a college.

Collegiate (a.) Of or pertaining to a college; as, collegiate studies; a collegiate society.

Collegiate (n.) A member of a college.

Collet (n.) A small collar or neckband.

Collet (n.) A small metal ring; a small collar fastened on an arbor; as, the collet on the balance arbor of a watch; a small socket on a stem, for holding a drill.

Collet (n.) The part of a ring containing the bezel in which the stone is set.

Colleterial (a.) Of or pertaining to the colleterium of insects.

Colleterium (n.) An organ of female insects, containing a cement to unite the ejected ova.

Collide (v. i.) To strike or dash against each other; to come into collision; to clash; as, the vessels collided; their interests collided.

Collidine (n.) One of a class of organic bases, C8H11N, usually pungent oily liquids, belonging to the pyridine series, and obtained from bone oil, coal tar, naphtha, and certain alkaloids.

Collie (n.) The Scotch shepherd dog. There are two breeds, the rough-haired and smooth-haired. It is remarkable for its intelligence, displayed especially in caring for flocks.

Collier (n.) One engaged in the business of digging mineral coal or making charcoal, or in transporting or dealing in coal.

Collier (n.) A vessel employed in the coal trade.

Colliery (n.) The place where coal is dug; a coal mine, and the buildings, etc., belonging to it.

Colliery (n.) The coal trade.

Colligate (v. t.) To bring together by colligation; to sum up in a single proposition.

Colligation (n.) That process by which a number of isolated facts are brought under one conception, or summed up in a general proposition, as when Kepler discovered that the various observed positions of the planet Mars were points in an ellipse.

Collimate (v. t.) To render parallel to a certain line or direction; to bring into the same line, as the axes of telescopes, etc.; to render parallel, as rays of light.

Collimation (n.) The act of collimating; the adjustment of the line of the sights, as the axial line of the telescope of an instrument, into its proper position relative to the other parts of the instrument.

Collimator (n.) A telescope arranged and used to determine errors of collimation, both vertical and horizontal.

Collimator (n.) A tube having a convex lens at one end and at the other a small opening or slit which is at the principal focus of the lens, used for producing a beam of parallel rays; also, a lens so used.

Colliquable (a.) Liable to melt, grow soft, or become fluid.

Colliquate (v. t. & i.) To change from solid to fluid; to make or become liquid; to melt.

Colliquation (n.) A processive wasting or melting away of the solid parts of the animal system with copious excretions of liquids by one or more passages.

Colliquative (a.) Causing rapid waste or exhaustion; melting; as, colliquative sweats.

Collocution (n.) A speaking or conversing together; conference; mutual discourse.

Collodion (n.) A solution of pyroxylin (soluble gun cotton) in ether containing a varying proportion of alcohol. It is strongly adhesive, and is used by surgeons as a coating for wounds; but its chief application is as a vehicle for the sensitive film in photography.

Collodionize (v. t.) To prepare or treat with collodion.

Collodiotype (n.) A picture obtained by the collodion process; a melanotype or ambrotype.

Collogue (v. i.) To talk or confer secretly and confidentially; to converse, especially with evil intentions; to plot mischief.

Colloid (a.) Resembling glue or jelly; characterized by a jellylike appearance; gelatinous; as, colloid tumors.

Colloid (n.) A gelatinous substance found in colloid degeneration and colloid cancer.

Colloidal (a.) Pertaining to, or of the nature of, colloids.

Colloidality (n.) The state or quality of being colloidal.

Colloped (a.) Having ridges or bunches of flesh, like collops.

Colloquial (a.) Pertaining to, or used in, conversation, esp. common and familiar conversation; conversational; hence, unstudied; informal; as, colloquial intercourse; colloquial phrases; a colloquial style.

Colloquialism (n.) A colloquial expression, not employed in formal discourse or writing.

Colloquialize (v. t.) To make colloquial and familiar; as, to colloquialize one's style of writing.

Colloquist (n.) A speaker in a colloquy or dialogue.

Colloquy (n.) Mutual discourse of two or more persons; conference; conversation.

Colloquy (n.) In some American colleges, a part in exhibitions, assigned for a certain scholarship rank; a designation of rank in collegiate scholarship.

Colluctation (n.) A struggling; a contention.

Collude (v. i.) To have secretly a joint part or share in an action; to play into each other's hands; to conspire; to act in concert.

Colluder (n.) One who conspires in a fraud.

Collusion (n.) A secret agreement and cooperation for a fraudulent or deceitful purpose; a playing into each other's hands; deceit; fraud; cunning.

Collusive (a.) Characterized by collusion; done or planned in collusion.

Collusive (a.) Acting in collusion.

Colly (n.) The black grime or soot of coal.

Colly (v. t.) To render black or dark, as of with coal smut; to begrime.

Colocolo (n.) A South American wild cat (Felis colocolo), of the size of the ocelot.

Colocynth (n.) The light spongy pulp of the fruit of the bitter cucumber (Citrullus, / Cucumis, colocynthis), an Asiatic plant allied to the watermelon; coloquintida. It comes in white balls, is intensely bitter, and a powerful cathartic. Called also bitter apple, bitter cucumber, bitter gourd.

Colocynthin (n.) The active medicinal principle of colocynth; a bitter, yellow, crystalline substance, regarded as a glucoside.

Cologne (n.) A perfumed liquid, composed of alcohol and certain aromatic oils, used in the toilet; -- called also cologne water and eau de cologne.

Cologne earth () An earth of a deep brown color, containing more vegetable than mineral matter; an earthy variety of lignite, or brown coal.

Colon (n.) A point or character, formed thus [:], used to separate parts of a sentence that are complete in themselves and nearly independent, often taking the place of a conjunction.

Colonel (n.) The chief officer of a regiment; an officer ranking next above a lieutenant colonel and next below a brigadier general.

Colonelcy (n.) The office, rank, or commission of a colonel.

Coloner (n.) A colonist.

Colonial (a.) Of or pertaining to a colony; as, colonial rights, traffic, wars.

Colonist (n.) A member or inhabitant of a colony.

Colonization (n.) The act of colonizing, or the state of being colonized; the formation of a colony or colonies.

Colonizationist (n.) A friend to colonization, esp. (U. S. Hist) to the colonization of Africa by emigrants from the colored population of the United States.

Colonize (v. t.) To plant or establish a colony or colonies in; to people with colonists; to migrate to and settle in.

Colonize (v. i.) To remove to, and settle in, a distant country; to make a colony.

Colonizer (n.) One who promotes or establishes a colony; a colonist.

Colonnade (n.) A series or range of columns placed at regular intervals with all the adjuncts, as entablature, stylobate, roof, etc.

Colony (n.) A company of people transplanted from their mother country to a remote province or country, and remaining subject to the jurisdiction of the parent state; as, the British colonies in America.

Colony (n.) The district or country colonized; a settlement.

Colony (n.) A company of persons from the same country sojourning in a foreign city or land; as, the American colony in Paris.

Colophene (n.) A colorless, oily liquid, formerly obtained by distillation of colophony. It is regarded as a polymeric form of terebenthene. Called also diterebene.

Colophon (n.) An inscription, monogram, or cipher, containing the place and date of publication, printer's name, etc., formerly placed on the last page of a book.

Colophonite (n.) A coarsely granular variety of garnet.

Color (n.) A property depending on the relations of light to the eye, by which individual and specific differences in the hues and tints of objects are apprehended in vision; as, gay colors; sad colors, etc.

Color (n.) The hue or color characteristic of good health and spirits; ruddy complexion.

Color (n.) That which is used to give color; a paint; a pigment; as, oil colors or water colors.

Color (n.) That which covers or hides the real character of anything; semblance; excuse; disguise; appearance.

Color (n.) A distinguishing badge, as a flag or similar symbol (usually in the plural); as, the colors or color of a ship or regiment; the colors of a race horse (that is, of the cap and jacket worn by the jockey).

Color (n.) An apparent right; as where the defendant in trespass gave to the plaintiff an appearance of title, by stating his title specially, thus removing the cause from the jury to the court.

Color (v. t.) To change or alter, as if by dyeing or painting; to give a false appearance to; usually, to give a specious appearance to; to cause to appear attractive; to make plausible; to palliate or excuse; as, the facts were colored by his prejudices.

Color (v. i.) To acquire color; to turn red, especially in the face; to blush.

Coloration (n.) The act or art of coloring; the state of being colored.

Colorature (n.) Vocal music colored, as it were, by florid ornaments, runs, or rapid passages.

Color-blind (a.) Affected with color blindness. See Color blindness, under Color, n.

Colored (a.) Having color; tinged; dyed; painted; stained.

Colored (a.) Specious; plausible; adorned so as to appear well; as, a highly colored description.

Colored (a.) Of some other color than black or white.

Colored (a.) Of some other color than white; specifically applied to negroes or persons having negro blood; as, a colored man; the colored people.

Colored (a.) Of some other color than green.

Colorific (a.) Capable of communicating color or tint to other bodies.

Colorimeter (n.) An instrument for measuring the depth of the color of anything, especially of a liquid, by comparison with a standard liquid.

Coloring (n.) The act of applying color to; also, that which produces color.

Coloring (n.) Change of appearance as by addition of color; appearance; show; disguise; misrepresentation.

Colorist (n.) One who colors; an artist who excels in the use of colors; one to whom coloring is of prime importance.

Colorless (a.) Without color; not distinguished by any hue; transparent; as, colorless water.

Colorless (a.) Free from any manifestation of partial or peculiar sentiment or feeling; not disclosing likes, dislikes, prejudice, etc.; as, colorless music; a colorless style; definitions should be colorless.

Colossal (a.) Of enormous size; gigantic; huge; as, a colossal statue.

Colotomy (n.) An operation for opening the colon

Colportage (n.) The distribution of religious books, tracts, etc., by colporteurs.

Colt (v. i.) To frisk or frolic like a colt; to act licentiously or wantonly.

Coltish (a.) Like a colt; wanton; frisky.

Colugo (n.) A peculiar East Indian mammal (Galleopithecus volans), having along the sides, connecting the fore and hind limbs, a parachutelike membrane, by means of which it is able to make long leaps, like the flying squirrel; -- called also flying lemur.

Columbarium (n.) A dovecote or pigeon house.

Columbary (n.) A dovecote; a pigeon house.

Columbate (n.) A salt of columbic acid; a niobate. See Columbium.

Columbia (n.) America; the United States; -- a poetical appellation given in honor of Columbus, the discoverer.

Columbiad (n.) A form of seacoast cannon; a long, chambered gun designed for throwing shot or shells with heavy charges of powder, at high angles of elevation.

Columbic (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, columbium or niobium; niobic.

Columbic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, the columbo root.

Columbiferous (a.) Producing or containing columbium.

Columbine (a.) Of or pertaining to a dove; dovelike; dove-colored.

Columbine (n.) A plant of several species of the genus Aquilegia; as, A. vulgaris, or the common garden columbine; A. Canadensis, the wild red columbine of North America.

Columbite (n.) A mineral of a black color, submetallic luster, and high specific specific gravity. It is a niobate (or columbate) of iron and manganese, containing tantalate of iron; -- first found in New England.

Columbium (n.) A rare element of the vanadium group, first found in a variety of the mineral columbite occurring in Connecticut, probably at Haddam. Atomic weight 94.2. Symbol Cb or Nb. Now more commonly called niobium.

Columella (n.) An axis to which a carpel of a compound pistil may be attached, as in the case of the geranium; or which is left when a pod opens.

Columella (n.) A columnlike axis in the capsules of mosses.

Columella (n.) A term applied to various columnlike parts; as, the columella, or epipterygoid bone, in the skull of many lizards; the columella of the ear, the bony or cartilaginous rod connecting the tympanic membrane with the internal ear.

Columella (n.) The central pillar or axis of the calicles of certain corals.

Columelliform (a.) Shaped like a little column, or columella.

Column (n.) A kind of pillar; a cylindrical or polygonal support for a roof, ceiling, statue, etc., somewhat ornamented, and usually composed of base, shaft, and capital. See Order.

Column (n.) Anything resembling, in form or position, a column in architecture; an upright body or mass; a shaft or obelisk; as, a column of air, of water, of mercury, etc.; the Column Vendome; the spinal column.

Column (n.) A body of troops formed in ranks, one behind the other; -- contradistinguished from line. Compare Ploy, and Deploy.

Column (n.) A perpendicular set of lines, not extending across the page, and separated from other matter by a rule or blank space; as, a column in a newspaper.

Columnar (a.) Formed in columns; having the form of a column or columns; like the shaft of a column.

Columnarity (n.) The state or quality of being columnar.

Columnated (a.) Having columns; as, columnated temples.

Columned (a.) Having columns.

Columniation (n.) The employment or arrangement of columns in a structure.

Colure (n.) One of two great circles intersecting at right angles in the poles of the equator. One of them passes through the equinoctial points, and hence is denominated the equinoctial colure; the other intersects the equator at the distance of 90¡ from the former, and is called the solstitial colure.

Com- () A prefix from the Latin preposition cum, signifying with, together, in conjunction, very, etc. It is used in the form com- before b, m, p, and sometimes f, and by assimilation becomes col- before l, cor- before r, and con- before any consonant except b, h, l, m, p, r, and w. Before a vowel com- becomes co-; also before h, w, and sometimes before other consonants.

Coma (n.) The envelope of a comet; a nebulous covering, which surrounds the nucleus or body of a comet.

Comanches (n. pl.) A warlike, savage, and nomadic tribe of the Shoshone family of Indians, inhabiting Mexico and the adjacent parts of the United States; -- called also Paducahs. They are noted for plundering and cruelty.

Comart (n.) A covenant.

Comate (a.) Encompassed with a coma, or bushy appearance, like hair; hairy.

Co-mate (n.) A companion.

Comatose (a.) Relating to, or resembling, coma; drowsy; lethargic; as, comatose sleep; comatose fever.

Comatula (n.) A crinoid of the genus Antedon and related genera. When young they are fixed by a stem. When adult they become detached and cling to seaweeds, etc., by their dorsal cirri; -- called also feather stars.

Comb (n.) An instrument for currying hairy animals, or cleansing and smoothing their coats; a currycomb.

Comb (n.) A former, commonly cone-shaped, used in hat manufacturing for hardening the soft fiber into a bat.

Comb (n.) The collector of an electrical machine, usually resembling a comb.

Comb (n.) The naked fleshy crest or caruncle on the upper part of the bill or hood of a cock or other bird. It is usually red.

Comb (n.) One of a pair of peculiar organs on the base of the abdomen of scorpions.

Comb (n.) The waxen framework forming the walls of the cells in which bees store their honey, eggs, etc.; honeycomb.

Comb (n.) The thumbpiece of the hammer of a gunlock, by which it may be cocked.

Comb (v. t.) To disentangle, cleanse, or adjust, with a comb; to lay smooth and straight with, or as with, a comb; as, to comb hair or wool. See under Combing.

Combe (n.) That unwatered portion of a valley which forms its continuation beyond and above the most elevated spring that issues into it.

Combat (v. i.) To struggle or contend, as with an opposing force; to fight.

Combat (v. t.) To fight with; to oppose by force, argument, etc.; to contend against; to resist.

Combat (n.) A fight; a contest of violence; a struggle for supremacy.

Combatable (a.) Such as can be, or is liable to be, combated; as, combatable foes, evils, or arguments.

Combatant (a.) Contending; disposed to contend.

Combatant (n.) One who engages in combat.

Combater (n.) One who combats.

Combative (a.) Disposed to engage in combat; pugnacious.

Combativeness (n.) The quality of being combative; propensity to contend or to quarrel.

Combativeness (n.) A cranial development supposed to indicate a combative disposition.

Combbroach (n.) A tooth of a wool comb.

Comber (n.) One who combs; one whose occupation it is to comb wool, flax, etc. Also, a machine for combing wool, flax, etc.

Combinable (a.) Capable of combining; consistent with.

Combination (n.) The act or process of combining or uniting persons and things.

Combination (n.) The result of combining or uniting; union of persons or things; esp. a union or alliance of persons or states to effect some purpose; -- usually in a bad sense.

Combination (n.) The act or process of uniting by chemical affinity, by which substances unite with each other in definite proportions by weight to form distinct compounds.

Combine (v. i.) To form a union; to agree; to coalesce; to confederate.

Combine (v. i.) To unite by affinity or natural attraction; as, two substances, which will not combine of themselves, may be made to combine by the intervention of a third.

Combined (a.) United closely; confederated; chemically united.

Combinedly (adv. In combination or cooperation) ; jointly.

Combiner (n.) One who, or that which, combines.

Combing (n.) The act or process of using a comb or a number of combs; as, the combing of one's hair; the combing of wool.

Combing (n.) That which is caught or collected with a comb, as loose, tangled hair.

Combless (a.) Without a comb or crest; as, a combless cock.

Comboloio (n.) A Mohammedan rosary, consisting of ninety-nine beads.

Combust (a.) Burnt; consumed.

Combustibility (n.) The quality of being combustible.

Combustion (n.) The combination of a combustible with a supporter of combustion, producing heat, and sometimes both light and heat.

Combustion (n.) Violent agitation; confusion; tumult.

Come (n.) To complete a movement toward a place; to arrive.

Come (n.) To get to be, as the result of change or progress; -- with a predicate; as, to come untied.

Come (v. t.) To carry through; to succeed in; as, you can't come any tricks here.

Comedian (n.) An actor or player in comedy.

Comedian (n.) A writer of comedy.

Comedienne (n.) A women who plays in comedy.

Comedietta (n.) A dramatic sketch; a brief comedy.

Comedo (n.) A small nodule or cystic tumor, common on the nose, etc., which on pressure allows the escape of a yellow wormlike mass of retained oily secretion, with a black head (dirt).

Comedy (n.) A dramatic composition, or representation of a bright and amusing character, based upon the foibles of individuals, the manners of society, or the ludicrous events or accidents of life; a play in which mirth predominates and the termination of the plot is happy; -- opposed to tragedy.

Comelily (adv.) In a suitable or becoming manner.

Comeliness (n.) The quality or state of being comely.

Comely (superl.) Suitable or becoming; proper; agreeable.

Comely (adv.) In a becoming manner.

Come-outer (n.) One who comes out or withdraws from a religious or other organization; a radical reformer.

Comer (n.) One who comes, or who has come; one who has arrived, and is present.

Comestible (n.) Something suitable to be eaten; -- commonly in the plural.

Comet (n.) A member of the solar system which usually moves in an elongated orbit, approaching very near to the sun in its perihelion, and receding to a very great distance from it at its aphelion. A comet commonly consists of three parts: the nucleus, the envelope, or coma, and the tail; but one or more of these parts is frequently wanting. See Illustration in Appendix.

Cometarium (n.) An instrument, intended to represent the revolution of a comet round the sun.

Cometary (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a comet.

Comet- seeker (n.) A telescope of low power, having a large field of view, used for finding comets.

Cometic (a.) Relating to a comet.

Cometographer (n.) One who describes or writes about comets.

Cometography (n.) A description of, or a treatise concerning, comets.

Cometology (n.) The department of astronomy relating to comets.

Comfit (n.) A dry sweetmeat; any kind of fruit, root, or seed preserved with sugar and dried; a confection.

Comfort (v. t.) To make strong; to invigorate; to fortify; to corroborate.

Comfort (v. t.) To impart strength and hope to; to encourage; to relieve; to console; to cheer.

Comfort (n.) Encouragement; solace; consolation in trouble; also, that which affords consolation.

Comfort (n.) A state of quiet enjoyment; freedom from pain, want, or anxiety; also, whatever contributes to such a condition.

Comfort (n.) A wadded bedquilt; a comfortable.

Comfort (n.) Unlawful support, countenance, or encouragement; as, to give aid and comfort to the enemy.

Comfortable (a.) Affording or imparting comfort or consolation; able to comfort; cheering; as, a comfortable hope.

Comfortable (a.) In a condition of comfort; having comforts; not suffering or anxious; hence, contented; cheerful; as, to lead a comfortable life.

Comfortable (a.) Free, or comparatively free, from pain or distress; -- used of a sick person.

Comfortable (n.) A stuffed or quilted coverlet for a bed; a comforter; a comfort.

Comfortableness (n.) State of being comfortable.

Comfortably (adv.) In a comfortable or comforting manner.

Comforter (n.) One who administers comfort or consolation.

Comforter (n.) The Holy Spirit, -- referring to his office of comforting believers.

Comforter (n.) A wadded bedquilt; a comfortable.

Comfortless (a.) Without comfort or comforts; in want or distress; cheerless.

Comfortment (n.) Act or process of administering comfort.

Comfortress (n.) A woman who comforts.

Comic (a.) Relating to comedy, as distinct from tragedy.

Comic (n.) A comedian.

Comical (a.) Relating to comedy.

Comical (a.) Exciting mirth; droll; laughable; as, a comical story.

Comicality (n.) The quality of being comical; something comical.

Comicry (n.) The power of exciting mirth; comicalness.

Coming (a.) Approaching; of the future, especially the near future; the next; as, the coming week or year; the coming exhibition.

Coming (a.) Ready to come; complaisant; fond.

Coming (n.) Approach; advent; manifestation; as, the coming of the train.

Coming (n.) Specifically: The Second Advent of Christ.

Comitial (a.) Relating to the comitia, or popular assemblies of the Romans for electing officers and passing laws.

Comity (n.) Mildness and suavity of manners; courtesy between equals; friendly civility; as, comity of manners; the comity of States.

Command (v. t.) To exercise direct authority over; to have control of; to have at one's disposal; to lead.

Command (v. t.) To have within a sphere of control, influence, access, or vision; to dominate by position; to guard; to overlook.

Command (v. t.) To have power or influence of the nature of authority over; to obtain as if by ordering; to receive as a due; to challenge; to claim; as, justice commands the respect and affections of the people; the best goods command the best price.

Command (v. t.) To direct to come; to bestow.

Command (n.) Authority; power or right of control; leadership; as, the forces under his command.

Command (n.) Power to dominate, command, or overlook by means of position; scope of vision; survey.

Command (n.) Control; power over something; sway; influence; as, to have command over one's temper or voice; the fort has command of the bridge.

Command (n.) A body of troops, or any naval or military force or post, or the whole territory under the authority or control of a particular officer.

Commandable (a.) Capable of being commanded.

Commandant (n.) A commander; the commanding officer of a place, or of a body of men; as, the commandant of a navy-yard.

Commandatory (a.) Mandatory; as, commandatory authority.

Commander (n.) An officer who ranks next below a captain, -- ranking with a lieutenant colonel in the army.

Commander (n.) The chief officer of a commandery.

Commandership (n.) The office of a commander.

Commandery (n.) The office or rank of a commander.

Commandery (n.) A district or a manor with lands and tenements appertaining thereto, under the control of a member of an order of knights who was called a commander; -- called also a preceptory.

Commandery (n.) A district under the administration of a military commander or governor.

Commanding (a.) Exercising authority; actually in command; as, a commanding officer.

Commanding (a.) Fitted to impress or control; as, a commanding look or presence.

Commanding (a.) Exalted; overlooking; having superior strategic advantages; as, a commanding position.

Commandingly (adv.) In a commanding manner.

Commandment (n.) An order or injunction given by authority; a command; a charge; a precept; a mandate.

Commandment (n.) The act of commanding; exercise of authority.

Commandment (n.) The offense of commanding or inducing another to violate the law.

Commandress (n.) A woman invested with authority to command.

Commark (n.) The frontier of a country; confines.

Commatic (a.) Having short clauses or sentences; brief; concise.

Commeasurable (a.) Having the same measure; commensurate; proportional.

Commeasure (v. t.) To be commensurate with; to equal.

Commemorable (a.) Worthy to be commemorated.

Commemorate (v. t.) To call to remembrance by a special act or observance; to celebrate with honor and solemnity; to honor, as a person or event, by some act of respect or affection, intended to preserve the remembrance of the person or event; as, to commemorate the sufferings and dying love of our Savior by the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; to commemorate the Declaration of Independence by the observance of the Fourth of July.

Commemoration (n.) The act of commemorating; an observance or celebration designed to honor the memory of some person or event.

Commemoration (n.) Whatever serves the purpose of commemorating; a memorial.

Commemorative (a.) Tending or intended to commemorate.

Commemorator (n.) One who commemorates.

Commemoratory (a.) Serving to commemorate; commemorative.

Commencement (n.) The first existence of anything; act or fact of commencing; rise; origin; beginning; start.

Commencement (n.) The day when degrees are conferred by colleges and universities upon students and others.

Commend (v. t.) To commit, intrust, or give in charge for care or preservation.

Commend (v. t.) To recommend as worthy of confidence or regard; to present as worthy of notice or favorable attention.

Commend (v. t.) To mention with approbation; to praise; as, to commend a person or an act.

Commend (v. t.) To mention by way of courtesy, implying remembrance and good will.

Commendable (a.) Worthy of being commended or praised; laudable; praiseworthy.

Commendam (n.) A vacant living or benefice commended to a cleric (usually a bishop) who enjoyed the revenue until a pastor was provided. A living so held was said to be held in commendam. The practice was abolished by law in 1836.

Commendatary (n.) One who holds a living in commendam.

Commendation (n.) The act of commending; praise; favorable representation in words; recommendation.

Commendation (n.) A message of affection or respect; compliments; greeting.

Commendator (n.) One who holds a benefice in commendam; a commendatary.

Commendatory (a.) Serving to commend; containing praise or commendation; commending; praising.

Commendatory (a.) Holding a benefice in commendam; as, a commendatory bishop.

Commendatory (n.) A commendation; eulogy.

Commender (n.) One who commends or praises.

Commensal (a.) Having the character of a commensal.

Commensurability (n.) The quality of being commensurable.

Commensurable (a.) Having a common measure; capable of being exactly measured by the same number, quantity, or measure.

Commensurably (adv.) In a commensurable manner; so as to be commensurable.

Commensurate (v. t.) To reduce to a common measure.

Commensurate (a.) Having a common measure; commensurable; reducible to a common measure; as, commensurate quantities.

Commensurately (adv.) In a commensurate manner; so as to be equal or proportionate; adequately.

Commensurateness (n.) The state or quality of being commensurate.

Commensuration (n.) The act of commensurating; the state of being commensurate.

Comment (v. t.) To comment on.

Comment (n.) A remark, observation, or criticism; gossip; discourse; talk.

Commentary (v. i.) A series of comments or annotations; esp., a book of explanations or expositions on the whole or a part of the Scriptures or of some other work.

Commentary (v. i.) A brief account of transactions or events written hastily, as if for a memorandum; -- usually in the plural; as, Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War.

Commentate (v. t. & i.) To write comments or notes upon; to make comments.

Commentation (n.) The act or process of commenting or criticising; exposition.

Commentation (n.) The result of the labors of a commentator.

Commentator (n.) One who writes a commentary or comments; an expositor; an annotator.

Commentatorial (a.) Pertaining to the making of commentaries.

Commentatorship (n.) The office or occupation of a commentator.

Commenter (n.) One who makes or writes comments; a commentator; an annotator.

Commentitious (a.) Fictitious or imaginary; unreal; as, a commentitious system of religion.

Commerce (n.) The exchange or buying and selling of commodities; esp. the exchange of merchandise, on a large scale, between different places or communities; extended trade or traffic.

Commerce (n.) Social intercourse; the dealings of one person or class in society with another; familiarity.

Commerce (n.) Sexual intercourse.

Commerce (v. i.) To hold intercourse; to commune.

Commercial (a.) Of or pertaining to commerce; carrying on or occupied with commerce or trade; mercantile; as, commercial advantages; commercial relations.

Commercialism (n.) The commercial spirit or method.

Commercially (adv.) In a commercial manner.

Commination (n.) An office in the liturgy of the Church of England, used on Ash Wednesday, containing a recital of God's anger and judgments against sinners.

Comminatory (a.) Threatening or denouncing punishment; as, comminatory terms.

Comminute (v. t.) To reduce to minute particles, or to a fine powder; to pulverize; to triturate; to grind; as, to comminute chalk or bones; to comminute food with the teeth.

Comminution (n.) The act of reducing to a fine powder or to small particles; pulverization; the state of being comminuted.

Commiseration (n.) The act of commiserating; sorrow for the wants, afflictions, or distresses of another; pity; compassion.

Commiserative (a.) Feeling or expressing commiseration.

Commissarial (a.) Of or pertaining to a commissary.

Commissary (n.) One to whom is committed some charge, duty, or office, by a superior power; a commissioner.

Commissary (n.) An officer having charge of a special service; as, the commissary of musters.

Commissary (n.) An officer whose business is to provide food for a body of troops or a military post; -- officially called commissary of subsistence.

Commissaryship (n.) The office or employment of a commissary.

Commission (n.) The act of committing, doing, or performing; the act of perpetrating.

Commission (n.) A formal written warrant or authority, granting certain powers or privileges and authorizing or commanding the performance of certain duties.

Commission (n.) A certificate conferring military or naval rank and authority; as, a colonel's commission.

Commission (n.) A company of persons joined in the performance of some duty or the execution of some trust; as, the interstate commerce commission.

Commission (n.) The acting under authority of, or on account of, another.

Commission (n.) The thing to be done as agent for another; as, I have three commissions for the city.

Commission (n.) The brokerage or allowance made to a factor or agent for transacting business for another; as, a commission of ten per cent on sales. See Del credere.

Commission (v. t.) To give a commission to; to furnish with a commission; to empower or authorize; as, to commission persons to perform certain acts; to commission an officer.

Commission (v. t.) To send out with a charge or commission.

Commissionary (a.) Of, pertaining to, or conferring, a commission; conferred by a commission or warrant.

Commissionate (v. t.) To commission

Commissioner (n.) A person who has a commission or warrant to perform some office, or execute some business, for the government, corporation, or person employing him; as, a commissioner to take affidavits or to adjust claims.

Commissionnaire (n.) An agent or factor; a commission merchant.

Commissionship (n.) The office of commissioner.

Commissive (a.) Relating to commission; of the nature of, or involving, commission.

Commissural (a.) Of or pertaining to a commissure.

Commissure (n.) A collection of fibers connecting parts of the brain or spinal marrow; a chiasma.

Commissure (n.) The line of junction or cohering face of two carpels, as in the parsnip, caraway, etc.

Commit (v. t.) To give in trust; to put into charge or keeping; to intrust; to consign; -- used with to, unto.

Commit (v. t.) To join for a contest; to match; -- followed by with.

Commit (v. t.) To pledge or bind; to compromise, expose, or endanger by some decisive act or preliminary step; -- often used reflexively; as, to commit one's self to a certain course.

Commit (v. t.) To confound.

Commit (v. i.) To sin; esp., to be incontinent.

Commitment (n.) The act of committing, or putting in charge, keeping, or trust; consignment; esp., the act of committing to prison.

Commitment (n.) The act of referring or intrusting to a committee for consideration and report; as, the commitment of a petition or a bill.

Commitment (n.) A doing, or perpetration, in a bad sense, as of a crime or blunder; commission.

Commitment (n.) The act of pledging or engaging; the act of exposing, endangering, or compromising; also, the state of being pledged or engaged.

Committable (a.) Capable of being committed.

Committal (n.) The act of committing, or the state of being committed; commitment.

Committee (n.) One or more persons elected or appointed, to whom any matter or business is referred, either by a legislative body, or by a court, or by any collective body of men acting together.

Committee (v. t.) One to whom the charge of the person or estate of another, as of a lunatic, is committed by suitable authority; a guardian.

Committeeman (n.) A member of a committee.

Committer (n.) One who commits; one who does or perpetrates.

Committible (a.) Capable of being committed; liable to be committed.

Commixture (n.) The act or process of mixing; the state of being mingled; the blending of ingredients in one mass or compound.

Commixture (n.) The mass formed by mingling different things; a compound; a mixture.

Commode (n.) A piece of furniture, so named according to temporary fashion

Commode (n.) A night stand with a compartment for holding a chamber vessel.

Commodious (a.) Adapted to its use or purpose, or to wants and necessities; serviceable; spacious and convenient; roomy and comfortable; as, a commodious house.

Commodiously (adv.) In a commodious manner.

Commodiousness (n.) State of being commodious; suitableness for its purpose; convenience; roominess.

Commodity (n.) Convenience; accommodation; profit; benefit; advantage; interest; commodiousness.

Commodity (n.) That which affords convenience, advantage, or profit, especially in commerce, including everything movable that is bought and sold (except animals), -- goods, wares, merchandise, produce of land and manufactures, etc.

Commodore (n.) An officer who ranks next above a captain; sometimes, by courtesy, the senior captain of a squadron. The rank of commodore corresponds with that of brigadier general in the army.

Commodore (n.) A captain commanding a squadron, or a division of a fleet, or having the temporary rank of rear admiral.

Commodore (n.) A title given by courtesy to the senior captain of a line of merchant vessels, and also to the chief officer of a yachting or rowing club.

Common (v.) Belonging or relating equally, or similarly, to more than one; as, you and I have a common interest in the property.

Common (v.) Belonging to or shared by, affecting or serving, all the members of a class, considered together; general; public; as, properties common to all plants; the common schools; the Book of Common Prayer.

Common (v.) Not distinguished or exceptional; inconspicuous; ordinary; plebeian; -- often in a depreciatory sense.

Common (n.) The people; the community.

Common (n.) The right of taking a profit in the land of another, in common either with the owner or with other persons; -- so called from the community of interest which arises between the claimant of the right and the owner of the soil, or between the claimants and other commoners entitled to the same right.

Common (v. i.) To converse together; to discourse; to confer.

Common (v. i.) To have a joint right with others in common ground.

Common (v. i.) To board together; to eat at a table in common.

Commonable (a.) Held in common.

Commonable (a.) Allowed to pasture on public commons.

Commonage (n.) The right of pasturing on a common; the right of using anything in common with others.

Commonalty (n.) The common people; those classes and conditions of people who are below the rank of nobility; the commons.

Commoner (n.) One of the common people; one having no rank of nobility.

Commoner (n.) One who has a joint right in common ground.

Commonish (a.) Somewhat common; commonplace; vulgar.

Commonly (adv.) Usually; generally; ordinarily; frequently; for the most part; as, confirmed habits commonly continue through life.

Commonly (adv.) In common; familiarly.

Commonness (n.) State or quality of being common or usual; as, the commonness of sunlight.

Commonplace (a.) Common; ordinary; trite; as, a commonplace person, or observation.

Commonplace (n.) A memorandum; something to be frequently consulted or referred to.

Commonplace (v. t.) To enter in a commonplace book, or to reduce to general heads.

Commonplace (v. i.) To utter commonplaces; to indulge in platitudes.

Commonplaceness (n.) The quality of being commonplace; commonness.

Commons (n. pl.) The mass of the people, as distinguished from the titled classes or nobility; the commonalty; the common people.

Commons (n. pl.) The House of Commons, or lower house of the British Parliament, consisting of representatives elected by the qualified voters of counties, boroughs, and universities.

Commons (n. pl.) Provisions; food; fare, -- as that provided at a common table in colleges and universities.

Commons (n. pl.) A club or association for boarding at a common table, as in a college, the members sharing the expenses equally; as, to board in commons.

Commons (n. pl.) A common; public pasture ground.

Commonty (n.) A common; a piece of land in which two or more persons have a common right.

Commonwealth (n.) A state; a body politic consisting of a certain number of men, united, by compact or tacit agreement, under one form of government and system of laws.

Commote (v. t.) To commove; to disturb; to stir up.

Communal (a.) Pertaining to a commune.

Communalism (n.) A French theory of government which holds that commune should be a kind of independent state, and the national government a confederation of such states, having only limited powers. It is advocated by advanced French republicans; but it should not be confounded with communism.

Communalist (n.) An advocate of communalism.

Communalistic (a.) Pertaining to communalism.

Commune (v. i.) To converse together with sympathy and confidence; to interchange sentiments or feelings; to take counsel.

Commune (v. i.) To receive the communion; to partake of the eucharist or Lord's supper.

Commune (n.) Communion; sympathetic intercourse or conversation between friends.

Commune (n.) The commonalty; the common people.

Commune (n.) A small territorial district in France under the government of a mayor and municipal council; also, the inhabitants, or the government, of such a district. See Arrondissement.

Communicability (n.) The quality of being communicable; capability of being imparted.

Communicable (a.) Capable of being communicated, or imparted; as, a communicable disease; communicable knowledge.

Communicant (n.) One who communicates.

Communicate (v. i.) To share in common; to participate in.

Communicate (v. i.) To impart; to bestow; to convey; as, to communicate a disease or a sensation; to communicate motion by means of a crank.

Communicate (v. i.) To make known; to recount; to give; to impart; as, to communicate information to any one.

Communicate (v. i.) To administer the communion to.

Communicate (v. i.) To share or participate; to possess or enjoy in common; to have sympathy.

Communicate (v. i.) To have intercourse or to be the means of intercourse; as, to communicate with another on business; to be connected; as, a communicating artery.

Communicate (v. i.) To partake of the Lord's supper; to commune.

Communication (n.) The act or fact of communicating; as, communication of smallpox; communication of a secret.

Communication (n.) Intercourse by words, letters, or messages; interchange of thoughts or opinions, by conference or other means; conference; correspondence.

Communication (n.) Association; company.

Communication (n.) Means of communicating; means of passing from place to place; a connecting passage; connection.

Communication (n.) That which is communicated or imparted; intelligence; news; a verbal or written message.

Communicative (a.) Inclined to communicate; ready to impart to others.

Communicativeness (n.) The quality of being communicative.

Communicator (n.) One who communicates.

Communion (n.) The act of sharing; community; participation.

Communion (n.) Intercourse between two or more persons; esp., intimate association and intercourse implying sympathy and confidence; interchange of thoughts, purposes, etc.; agreement; fellowship; as, the communion of saints.

Communion (n.) A body of Christians having one common faith and discipline; as, the Presbyterian communion.

Communion (n.) The sacrament of the eucharist; the celebration of the Lord's supper; the act of partaking of the sacrament; as, to go to communion; to partake of the communion.

Communism (n.) A scheme of equalizing the social conditions of life; specifically, a scheme which contemplates the abolition of inequalities in the possession of property, as by distributing all wealth equally to all, or by holding all wealth in common for the equal use and advantage of all.

Communist (n.) An advocate for the theory or practice of communism.

Communist (n.) A supporter of the commune of Paris.

Communistic (a.) Of or pertaining to communism or communists; as, communistic theories.

Communistic (a.) Living or having their nests in common, as certain birds.

Community (n.) Common possession or enjoyment; participation; as, a community of goods.

Community (n.) A body of people having common rights, privileges, or interests, or living in the same place under the same laws and regulations; as, a community of monks. Hence a number of animals living in a common home or with some apparent association of interests.

Community (n.) Society at large; a commonwealth or state; a body politic; the public, or people in general.

Commutability (n.) The quality of being commutable.

Commutable (a.) Capable of being commuted or interchanged.

Commutableness (n.) The quality of being commutable; interchangeableness.

Commutation (n.) The change of a penalty or punishment by the pardoning power of the State; as, the commutation of a sentence of death to banishment or imprisonment.

Commutation (n.) A substitution, as of a less thing for a greater, esp. a substitution of one form of payment for another, or one payment for many, or a specific sum of money for conditional payments or allowances; as, commutation of tithes; commutation of fares; commutation of copyright; commutation of rations.

Commutator (n.) A piece of apparatus used for reversing the direction of an electrical current; an attachment to certain electrical machines, by means of which alternating currents are made to be continuous or to have the same direction.

Commute (v. t.) To exchange; to put or substitute something else in place of, as a smaller penalty, obligation, or payment, for a greater, or a single thing for an aggregate; hence, to lessen; to diminish; as, to commute a sentence of death to one of imprisonment for life; to commute tithes; to commute charges for fares.

Commute (v. i.) To obtain or bargain for exemption or substitution; to effect a commutation.

Commute (v. i.) To pay, or arrange to pay, in gross instead of part by part; as, to commute for a year's travel over a route.

Commuter (n.) One who commutes; especially, one who commutes in traveling.

Compact (p. p. & a) Joined or held together; leagued; confederated.

Compact (p. p. & a) Brief; close; pithy; not diffuse; not verbose; as, a compact discourse.

Compact (v. t.) To thrust, drive, or press closely together; to join firmly; to consolidate; to make close; -- as the parts which compose a body.

Compact (v. t.) To unite or connect firmly, as in a system.

Compact (n.) An agreement between parties; a covenant or contract.

Compacted (a.) Compact; pressed close; concentrated; firmly united.

Compactedly (adv.) In a compact manner.

Compactedness (n.) A state of being compact.

Compacter (n.) One who makes a compact.

Compactible (a.) That may be compacted.

Compaction (n.) The act of making compact, or the state of being compact.

Compactly (adv.) In a compact manner; with close union of parts; densely; tersely.

Compactness (n.) The state or quality of being compact; close union of parts; density.

Compacture (n.) Close union or connection of parts; manner of joining; construction.

Compaginate (v. t.) To unite or hold together; as, the side pieces compaginate the frame.

Companion (n.) One who accompanies or is in company with another for a longer or shorter period, either from choice or casually; one who is much in the company of, or is associated with, another or others; an associate; a comrade; a consort; a partner.

Companion (n.) A knight of the lowest rank in certain orders; as, a companion of the Bath.

Companion (n.) A fellow; -- in contempt.

Companion (n.) A wooden hood or penthouse covering the companion way; a companion hatch.

Companion (v. t.) To be a companion to; to attend on; to accompany.

Companion (v. t.) To qualify as a companion; to make equal.

Companionable (a.) Fitted to be a companion; fit for good fellowship; agreeable; sociable.

Companionless (a.) Without a companion.

Companionship (n.) Fellowship; association; the act or fact of keeping company with any one.

Company (n.) The state of being a companion or companions; the act of accompanying; fellowship; companionship; society; friendly intercourse.

Company (n.) A companion or companions.

Company (n.) Guests or visitors, in distinction from the members of a family; as, to invite company to dine.

Company (n.) Society, in general; people assembled for social intercourse.

Company (n.) An association of persons for the purpose of carrying on some enterprise or business; a corporation; a firm; as, the East India Company; an insurance company; a joint-stock company.

Company (n.) A subdivision of a regiment of troops under the command of a captain, numbering in the United States (full strength) 100 men.

Company (n.) The crew of a ship, including the officers; as, a whole ship's company.

Company (v. t.) To accompany or go with; to be companion to.

Company (v. i.) To be a gay companion.

Company (v. i.) To have sexual commerce.

Comparable (a.) Capable of being compared; worthy of comparison.

Comparate (n.) One of two things compared together.

Comparative (a.) Of or pertaining to comparison.

Comparative (a.) Proceeding from, or by the method of, comparison; as, the comparative sciences; the comparative anatomy.

Comparative (a.) Estimated by comparison; relative; not positive or absolute, as compared with another thing or state.

Comparative (a.) Expressing a degree greater or less than the positive degree of the quality denoted by an adjective or adverb. The comparative degree is formed from the positive by the use of -er, more, or less; as, brighter, more bright, or less bright.

Comparative (n.) The comparative degree of adjectives and adverbs; also, the form by which the comparative degree is expressed; as, stronger, wiser, weaker, more stormy, less windy, are all comparatives.

Comparative (n.) An equal; a rival; a compeer.

Comparative (n.) One who makes comparisons; one who affects wit.

Comparatively (adv.) According to estimate made by comparison; relatively; not positively or absolutely.

Comparator (n.) An instrument or machine for comparing anything to be measured with a standard measure; -- applied especially to a machine for comparing standards of length.

Compare (v. t.) To examine the character or qualities of, as of two or more persons or things, for the purpose of discovering their resemblances or differences; to bring into comparison; to regard with discriminating attention.

Compare (v. t.) To inflect according to the degrees of comparison; to state positive, comparative, and superlative forms of; as, most adjectives of one syllable are compared by affixing "- er" and "-est" to the positive form; as, black, blacker, blackest; those of more than one syllable are usually compared by prefixing "more" and "most", or "less" and "least", to the positive; as, beautiful, more beautiful, most beautiful.

Compare (v. i.) To be like or equal; to admit, or be worthy of, comparison; as, his later work does not compare with his earlier.

Compare (n.) Illustration by comparison; simile.

Comparer (n.) One who compares.

Comparison (n.) The act of comparing; an examination of two or more objects with the view of discovering the resemblances or differences; relative estimate.

Comparison (n.) The state of being compared; a relative estimate; also, a state, quality, or relation, admitting of being compared; as, to bring a thing into comparison with another; there is no comparison between them.

Comparison (n.) That to which, or with which, a thing is compared, as being equal or like; illustration; similitude.

Comparison (n.) The modification, by inflection or otherwise, which the adjective and adverb undergo to denote degrees of quality or quantity; as, little, less, least, are examples of comparison.

Comparison (n.) A figure by which one person or thing is compared to another, or the two are considered with regard to some property or quality, which is common to them both; e.g., the lake sparkled like a jewel.

Comparison (n.) The faculty of the reflective group which is supposed to perceive resemblances and contrasts.

Comparison (v. t.) To compare.

Compartition (n.) The act of dividing into parts or compartments; division; also, a division or compartment.

Compartment (n.) One of the parts into which an inclosed portion of space is divided, as by partitions, or lines; as, the compartments of a cabinet, a house, or a garden.

Compass (n.) A passing round; circuit; circuitous course.

Compass (n.) An inclosing limit; boundary; circumference; as, within the compass of an encircling wall.

Compass (n.) Extent; reach; sweep; capacity; sphere; as, the compass of his eye; the compass of imagination.

Compass (n.) A pair of compasses.

Compass (n.) A circle; a continent.

Compass (v. t.) To reach round; to circumvent; to get within one's power; to obtain; to accomplish.

Compassable (a.) Capable of being compassed or accomplished.

Compasses (n.) An instrument for describing circles, measuring figures, etc., consisting of two, or (rarely) more, pointed branches, or legs, usually joined at the top by a rivet on which they move.

Compassing (a.) Curved; bent; as, compassing timbers.

Compassion (n.) Literally, suffering with another; a sensation of sorrow excited by the distress or misfortunes of another; pity; commiseration.

Compassionable (a.) Deserving compassion or pity; pitiable.

Compassionate (v. t.) To have compassion for; to pity; to commiserate; to sympathize with.

Compassionately (adv.) In a compassionate manner; mercifully.

Compassionateness (n.) The quality or state of being compassionate.

Compassless (a.) Having no compass.

Compatibility (n.) The quality or power of being compatible or congruous; congruity; as, a compatibility of tempers; a compatibility of properties.

Compatible (a.) Capable of existing in harmony; congruous; suitable; not repugnant; -- usually followed by with.

Compatibleness (n.) Compatibility; consistency; fitness; agreement.

Compatibly (adv.) In a compatible manner.

Compatriot (n.) One of the same country, and having like interests and feeling.

Compatriot (a.) Of the same country; having a common sentiment of patriotism.

Compatriotism (n.) The condition of being compatriots.

Compear (v. i.) To appear in court personally or by attorney.

Compeer () An equal, as in rank, age, prowess, etc.; a companion; a comrade; a mate.

Compel (v. t.) To drive or urge with force, or irresistibly; to force; to constrain; to oblige; to necessitate, either by physical or moral force.

Compel (v. t.) To gather or unite in a crowd or company.

Compellable (a.) Capable of being compelled or constrained.

Compellably (adv.) By compulsion.

Compellatory (a.) Serving to compel; compulsory.

Compeller (n.) One who compels or constrains.

Compend (n.) A compendium; an epitome; a summary.

Compendiarious (a.) Short; compendious.

Compendiate (v. t.) To sum or collect together.

Compendious (a.) Containing the substance or general principles of a subject or work in a narrow compass; abridged; summarized.

Compendiously (adv.) In a compendious manner.

Compendiousness (n.) The state or quality of being compendious.

Compendium (n.) A brief compilation or composition, containing the principal heads, or general principles, of a larger work or system; an abridgment; an epitome; a compend; a condensed summary.

Compensate (v. t.) To make equal return to; to remunerate; to recompense; to give an equivalent to; to requite suitably; as, to compensate a laborer for his work, or a merchant for his losses.

Compensate (v. t.) To be equivalent in value or effect to; to counterbalance; to make up for; to make amends for.

Compensate (v. i.) To make amends; to supply an equivalent; -- followed by for; as, nothing can compensate for the loss of reputation.

Compensation (n.) The act or principle of compensating.

Compensation (n.) That which constitutes, or is regarded as, an equivalent; that which makes good the lack or variation of something else; that which compensates for loss or privation; amends; remuneration; recompense.

Compensation (n.) A recompense or reward for some loss or service.

Compensation (n.) An equivalent stipulated for in contracts for the sale of real estate, in which it is customary to provide that errors in description, etc., shall not avoid, but shall be the subject of compensation.

Compensative (a.) Affording compensation.

Compensator (n.) One who, or that which, compensates; -- a name applied to various mechanical devices.

Compensator (n.) An iron plate or magnet placed near the compass on iron vessels to neutralize the effect of the ship's attraction on the needle.

Compensatory (a.) Serving for compensation; making amends.

Compense (v. t.) To compensate.

Compete (v. i.) To contend emulously; to seek or strive for the same thing, position, or reward for which another is striving; to contend in rivalry, as for a prize or in business; as, tradesmen compete with one another.

Competency (n.) The state of being competent; fitness; ability; adequacy; power.

Competency (n.) Property or means sufficient for the necessaries and conveniences of life; sufficiency without excess.

Competency (n.) Legal capacity or qualifications; fitness; as, the competency of a witness or of a evidence.

Competency (n.) Right or authority; legal power or capacity to take cognizance of a cause; as, the competence of a judge or court.

Competently (adv.) In a competent manner; adequately; suitably.

Competible (a.) Compatible; suitable; consistent.

Competition (n.) The act of seeking, or endeavoring to gain, what another is endeavoring to gain at the same time; common strife for the same objects; strife for superiority; emulous contest; rivalry, as for approbation, for a prize, or as where two or more persons are engaged in the same business and each seeking patronage; -- followed by for before the object sought, and with before the person or thing competed with.

Competitive (a.) Of or pertaining to competition; producing competition; competitory; as, a competitive examination.

Competitor (n.) One who seeks what another seeks, or claims what another claims; one who competes; a rival.

Competitor (n.) An associate; a confederate.

Competitory (a.) Acting in competition; competing; rival.

Competitress (n.) A woman who competes.

Competitrix (n.) A competitress.

Compilation (n.) The act or process of compiling or gathering together from various sources.

Compilation (n.) That which is compiled; especially, a book or document composed of materials gathering from other books or documents.

Compile (v. t.) To put together; to construct; to build.

Compile (v. t.) To contain or comprise.

Compile (v. t.) To put together in a new form out of materials already existing; esp., to put together or compose out of materials from other books or documents.

Compile (v. t.) To write; to compose.

Compiler (n.) One who compiles; esp., one who makes books by compilation.

Compinge (v. t.) To compress; to shut up.

Complacency (n.) Calm contentment; satisfaction; gratification.

Complacency (n.) The manifestation of contentment or satisfaction; good nature; kindness; civility; affability.

Complacent (a.) Self-satisfied; contented; kindly; as, a complacent temper; a complacent smile.

Complacential (a.) Marked by, or causing, complacence.

Complacently (adv.) In a complacent manner.

Complain (v. i.) To give utterance to expression of grief, pain, censure, regret. etc.; to lament; to murmur; to find fault; -- commonly used with of. Also, to creak or squeak, as a timber or wheel.

Complainable (a.) That may be complained of.

Complainant (n.) One who makes complaint.

Complainant (n.) One who commences a legal process by a complaint.

Complainant (n.) The party suing in equity, answering to the plaintiff at common law.

Complainer (n.) One who complains or laments; one who finds fault; a murmurer.

Complaint (n.) Cause or subject of complaint or murmuring.

Complaint (n.) A formal allegation or charge against a party made or presented to the appropriate court or officer, as for a wrong done or a crime committed (in the latter case, generally under oath); an information; accusation; the initial bill in proceedings in equity.

Complaintful (a.) Full of complaint.

Complaisance (n.) Disposition to please or oblige; obliging compliance with the wishes of others; a deportment indicative of a desire to please; courtesy; civility.

Complaisant (a.) Desirous to please; courteous; obliging; compliant; as, a complaisant gentleman.

Complement (v. t.) That which fills up or completes; the quantity or number required to fill a thing or make it complete.

Complement (v. t.) That which is required to supply a deficiency, or to complete a symmetrical whole.

Complement (v. t.) Full quantity, number, or amount; a complete set; completeness.

Complement (v. t.) A second quantity added to a given quantity to make it equal to a third given quantity.

Complement (v. t.) The interval wanting to complete the octave; -- the fourth is the complement of the fifth, the sixth of the third.

Complement (v. t.) A compliment.

Complement (v. t.) To compliment.

Complemental (a.) Supplying, or tending to supply, a deficiency; fully completing.

Complemental (a.) Complimentary; courteous.

Complementary (a.) Serving to fill out or to complete; as, complementary numbers.

Complementary (n.) One skilled in compliments.

Complete (a.) Filled up; with no part or element lacking; free from deficiency; entire; perfect; consummate.

Complete (a.) Finished; ended; concluded; completed; as, the edifice is complete.

Complete (a.) Having all the parts or organs which belong to it or to the typical form; having calyx, corolla, stamens, and pistil.

Complete (v. t.) To bring to a state in which there is no deficiency; to perfect; to consummate; to accomplish; to fulfill; to finish; as, to complete a task, or a poem; to complete a course of education.

Completely (adv.) In a complete manner; fully.

Completement (n.) Act of completing or perfecting; completion.

Completeness (n.) The state of being complete.

Completion (n.) The act or process of making complete; the getting through to the end; as, the completion of an undertaking, an education, a service.

Completion (n.) State of being complete; fulfillment; accomplishment; realization.

Completive (a.) Making complete.

Complex (n.) Composed of two or more parts; composite; not simple; as, a complex being; a complex idea.

Complex (n.) Involving many parts; complicated; intricate.

Complex (n.) Assemblage of related things; collection; complication.

Complexed (a.) Complex, complicated.

Complexedness (n.) The quality or state of being complex or involved; complication.

Complexion (n.) The state of being complex; complexity.

Complexion (n.) A combination; a complex.

Complexion (n.) The bodily constitution; the temperament; habitude, or natural disposition; character; nature.

Complexion (n.) The color or hue of the skin, esp. of the face.

Complexion (n.) The general appearance or aspect; as, the complexion of the sky; the complexion of the news.

Complexional (a.) Of or pertaining to constitutional complexion.

Complexionary (a.) Pertaining to the complexion, or to the care of it.

Complexioned (a.) Having (such) a complexion; -- used in composition; as, a dark-complexioned or a ruddy-complexioned person.

Complexity (n.) The state of being complex; intricacy; entanglement.

Complexity (n.) That which is complex; intricacy; complication.

Complexly (adv.) In a complex manner; not simply.

Complexness (n.) The state of being complex; complexity.

Complexus (n.) A complex; an aggregate of parts; a complication.

Compliable (a.) Capable of bending or yielding; apt to yield; compliant.

Compliance (n.) The act of complying; a yielding; as to a desire, demand, or proposal; concession; submission.

Compliance (n.) A disposition to yield to others; complaisance.

Compliantly (adv.) In a compliant manner.

Complicacy (n.) A state of being complicate or intricate.

Complicate (a.) Composed of two or more parts united; complex; complicated; involved.

Complicate (v. t.) To fold or twist together; to combine intricately; to make complex; to combine or associate so as to make intricate or difficult.

Complicately (adv.) In a complex manner.

Complication (n.) The act or process of complicating; the state of being complicated; intricate or confused relation of parts; entanglement; complexity.

Complication (n.) A disease or diseases, or adventitious circumstances or conditions, coexistent with and modifying a primary disease, but not necessarily connected with it.

Complice (n.) An accomplice.

Complicity (n.) The state of being an accomplice; participation in guilt.

Complier (n.) One who complies, yields, or obeys; one of an easy, yielding temper.

Compliment (n.) An expression, by word or act, of approbation, regard, confidence, civility, or admiration; a flattering speech or attention; a ceremonious greeting; as, to send one's compliments to a friend.

Compliment (v. t.) To praise, flatter, or gratify, by expressions of approbation, respect, or congratulation; to make or pay a compliment to.

Compliment (v. i.) To pass compliments; to use conventional expressions of respect.

Complimentary (a.) Expressive of regard or praise; of the nature of, or containing, a compliment; as, a complimentary remark; a complimentary ticket.

Complimenter (n.) One who compliments; one given to complimenting; a flatterer.

Complot (n.) A plotting together; a confederacy in some evil design; a conspiracy.

Complot (v. t. & i.) To plot or plan together; to conspire; to join in a secret design.

Compluvium (n.) A space left unroofed over the court of a Roman dwelling, through which the rain fell into the impluvium or cistern.

Comply (v. i.) To yield assent; to accord; agree, or acquiesce; to adapt one's self; to consent or conform; -- usually followed by with.

Comply (v. i.) To be ceremoniously courteous; to make one's compliments.

Comply (v. i.) To fulfill; to accomplish.

Compone (v. t.) To compose; to settle; to arrange.

Component (v. t.) Serving, or helping, to form; composing; constituting; constituent.

Component (n.) A constituent part; an ingredient.

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